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Biography of Hon. Rezin Davidge

Among the early practitioners at the bar of Christian County, none surpassed in profound legal attainments Rezin Davidge. He was a brilliant and forcible speaker, an excellent judge of law, and a faithful and conscientious attorney. Strength of mind and purity of purpose were his leading traits. In his profession of the law, these made him a great chancery lawyer, no doubt one of the ablest the county knew in the early period of its history. In that branch of the law practice, that sometimes requires scheming and cunning diplomacy, he was neither great nor very successful, a proof that his nature was faithful and just, and that his integrity of mind was better adapted to the equity courts. Judge Davidge was a native of Maryland, born in Baltimore County about the year 1770, and came to Kentucky soon after its admission into the Union as a State. He died in Hopkinsville, at ninety-seven years of age, and sleeps in the beautiful cemetery adjacent to the city. He came of a noted and wealthy family, and received all the educational advantages afforded by the infant Republic, with a finishing course in Europe. Thus his mental cultivation had been extensive, and his reading of a wider range than the average young man was able to obtain. In early life he served as midshipman in the United States Navy, and distinguished him-self as a gallant young officer. He had read law before his visit to the old country, and after a stay there of a year or two, enjoying the advantages of wisdom derived from such men as Pitt and Fox,...

Biography of Hon. Ninian Edwards

The eminent character of this gentleman requires more than a passing mention, in fact, a sketch of the early courts and bar of Christian County would be imperfect without an extended notice of him and his many public services. He has left a record in two States that time cannot efface. As a lawyer, jurist and statesman he was pre-eminently great. For nearly forty years he devoted his best energies to the service of his country, wielding an influence exceeded by few of his day and time. At the period when Judge┬áNinian Edwards lived his most active life, the surroundings were such as we know little or nothing of now except by tradition. The pioneer people were rough, rude, simple, sincere, honest, warm-hearted and hospitable. In the young State were the two extremes, the rude simplicity, and the gifted, brilliant children of genius, and amid these surroundings Judge Edwards trod his pathway of life, the pure politician, lawyer and statesman. He was born in 1775, in Montgomery County, Md. His father, Benjamin Edwards, was a native of Virginia, and a man of considerable prominence, having served in the Maryland Legislature, in the State Convention which ratified the Federal Constitution, and also represented his State in Congress from 1793 to 1795. Ninian Edwards graduated in Dickinson College, Pennsylvania. He studied law and medicine, and practiced the former with great success. He came to Kentucky in 1794, and devoted some time to the improvement of a farm in Nelson County, located by his father, and on which his father’s family settled in 1800. He was elected to the Kentucky Legislature in...

Biography of Hon. Joseph B. Crockett

The following sketch was written by Hon. James F. Buckner, of Louisville, for the Kentucky New Era. Col. Buckner was a student of Mr. Crockett, and for several years his law partner, hence no one is better qualified to write an impartial sketch of the man, and he pays a noble tribute to his old friend, partner and preceptor. He says: Joseph B. Crockett, the son of Col. Robert Crockett, was born in 1808, at Union Mills, in Jessamine County, Kentucky, and settled on a farm near Russellville. It was while Col. Crockett was pursuing the vocation of a farmer in Logan County that the son enjoyed the advantages of the tuition of Daniel Comfort, a gentleman who for many years taught a classical school in that vicinity, and to whom many of the most distinguished men of that section were indebted for instruction. In the spring of 1827 he entered the University of Tennessee at Nashville, but in con-sequence of the straitened pecuniary condition of his father he was compelled to leave Nashville after having enjoyed the benefit of the University for less than one year. When only nineteen years of age he came to Hopkinsville and entered upon the study of law in the office of Hon. Charles S. Morehead, who was then one of the most promising young attorneys of the State, and who was rapidly rising to distinction in his profession. Young Crockett was a close student, and displayed great energy and spared no labor to make himself useful to his preceptor, who was enjoying a large practice. His deportment was such as secured the...

Biographical Sketch of Hiero T. Wilson

Hiero T. Wilson, one of the first white settlers in Southern Kansas, was born at Russellville, Logan County, Kentucky, September 2, 1806, of Virginian ancestry. His father was a native of the Old Dominion, a Kentucky farmer and for many years surveyor of Logan County. Hiero Wilson was reared on his father’s farm and had some schooling and considerable training in mereantile pursults before he joined his brother in Indian Territory during the year 1834. The latter was then post sutler and trader at Fort Gibson, Cherokee Nation. In 1843, when Fort Scott was established as a military post, Hiero T. Wilson was appointed its sutler, holding the position for ten years. When the post was abandoned in 1855, Mr. Wilson continued in business and a year later, when the Government buildings were sold, bought a home on the plaza. This he transformed into a beautiful residence and there died August 6, 1892; but not before the post had become a prosperous city. As secretary and treasurer of the Town Company, of which George A. Crawford was president, he was a large contributor to its development. He purchased much real estate and platted an addition to Fort Scott; was director of the First National Bank and of the Missouri River, Fort Scott & Gulf Railroad, and a leader in all the progress of the city and section. One of the streets in Fort Scott and Wilson County are also named in his...

Biography of G. T. B. Perry

G. T. B. PERRY. The practical value of shrewdness and discrimination combined with strict probity is exemplified in the prosperous condition of those who transact business on these principles. Mr. G. T. B. Perry, a prominent general merchant of Ozark, has a reputation for honorable dealing built up out of the practice of these invaluable principles. He is a product of the Blue Grass soil of Kentucky, Logan County, near Russellville, and is a son of John T. and Mary E. (Ewing) Perry, both natives of Kentucky. The grandfather, Samuel Perry, was a native of Virginia, and the family came from the East and settled in Kentucky at an early day. The father of our subject was reared in the last named State and remained there until 1867, when he came to Missouri, locating two miles west of Ozark, on the Finley River. There he tilled the soil until his death in 1873. He was a wagon-maker by trade and followed that while residing in Kentucky. In political matters he was a Democrat, but was conservative and was not in favor of secession. He was an exemplary member of the Christian Church. The mother was the only child of William Ewing and came of an old and prominent Kentucky family, being related to Congressman Ewing of that State. Mrs. Perry is still living and resides on the old home in Ozark. Although about seventy years of age time has dealt leniently with her and she is still spry and active. Six of the children born to this esteemed couple are now living, as follows: Amanda J., now Mrs. Perrin,...

Biography of James D. McCurdy, M. D.

In an analyzation of the character and life work of Dr. James Darwin McCurdy we note many of the characteristics which have marked the Scotch nation for many centuries, the perseverance, reliability, energy and unconquerable determination to pursue a course that has been marked out. It is these sterling qualities which have gained to Dr. McCurdy success in life and made him one of the substantial and valued citizens of Idaho. He now resides in Bellevue, Blaine County, and while he has retired from the practice of medicine he is still actively interested in mining, being the owner of a valuable group of mines in the Wood River valley. Mr. McCurdy was born in Kentucky, March 22, 1820. The family originated in Scotland, although the grandfather of our subject came to America from the north of Ireland and took up his residence in Virginia. He loyally served the colonies in their struggle for independence, and afterward emigrated to Kentucky, becoming one of the pioneers of that state. He was a Presbyterian in his religious belief, and lived to an advanced age. The Doctor’s father, James Darwin McCurdy, Sr., was an only son and was born in Virginia. He married Miss Livenia Sharp, a native of Virginia, and a daughter of Thomas Sharp, who also removed from the Old Dominion to Kentucky during the early history of the lat-ter state. Unto James D. and Livenia McCurdy were born eleven children, two of whom reached years of maturity. The father died at the age of sixty-three years, and the mother, long surviving him, passed away at the age of eighty-seven. The...

Biography of Charles H. Tully

Charles H. Tully, attorney at law in Eufaula, has not only gained an enviable position in the legal circles of the state but is prominently known in business and political circles as well. He has won the success he now enjoys as the result of his own intelligently directed efforts and is rightly entitled to the proud American title of self-made man. He was born in Russellville, Logan county, Kentucky, on the 19th of November, 1865, a son of Henry B. and America (Angell) Tully, also natives of that state. His father was one of the successful men of his day, winning wide-spread prominence as a promoter and builder. He owned considerable business property and thousands of acres of land in Kentucky and other states. Being particularly fond of horses, his hobby was breeding thoroughbreds and he owned the first fast trotting horse in Logan county. Mr. Tully lived at Russellville the greater part of his life and always in Logan county. He had extensive banking interests and always took a prominent and active part in politics. His death occurred in 1877 when but thirty-seven years of age. To his marriage six children were born, Charles H., whose name initiates this review, being the only son. The other children are: Carrie, deceased; Katie, living in Fort Worth, Texas; Lizzie, deceased; Lucy, a resident of Nevada, Missouri; and Mary, deceased. In the acquirement of an education, Charles H. Tully attended the public schools of Russellville, Kentucky, and subsequently became a student in Bethel College there. In 1884 he went to Vernon county, Missouri, where for two years he worked on...

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