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Slave Narrative of Henry Banner

Interviewer: S. S. Taylor Person Interviewed: Henry Banner Location: County Hospital, Little Rock, Arkansas [HW: Forty Acres and a Mule] “I was sold the third year of the war for fifteen years old. That would be in 1864. That would make my birthday come in 1849. I must have been 12 year old when the war started and sixteen when Lee surrendered. I was born and raised in Russell County, Ol’ Virginny. I was sold out of Russell County during the war. Ol’ Man Menefee refugeed me into Tennessee near Knoxville. They sold me down there to a man named Jim Maddison. He carried me down in Virginny near Lynchburg and sold me to Jim Alec Wright. He was the man I was with in the time of the surrender. Then I was in a town called Liberty. The last time I was sold, I sold for $2,300,—more than I’m worth now. “Police were for white folks. Patteroles were for niggers. If they caught niggers out without a pass they would whip them. The patteroles were for darkies, police for other people. “They run me once, and I ran home. I had a dog at home, and there wasn’t no chance them gettin’ by that dog. They caught me once in Liberty, and Mrs. Charlie Crenchaw, Ol’ John Crenchaw’s daughter, came out and made them turn me loose. She said, ‘They are our darkies; turn them loose.’ “One of them got after me one night. I ran through a gate and he couldn’t get through. Every time I looked around, I would see through the trees some bush or...

Biographical Sketch of Isaiah H. Johnston

Isaiah H. Johnston, President of the Second National Bank, Charleston; was born in Russell Co., Va., April 24, 1827; his father, Abner Johnston, came to this county in 1830, and settled in what is now Pleasant Grove Tp., and lived there until his death, which occurred in 1848. Mr. Johnston followed farming until he was 27 years old, and then engaged in merchandising, and, in 1857, removed to Mattoon, and continued in business there till 1860; he was then elected Sheriff, of Coles Co., and removed to Charleston; he served as Sheriff two years, and afterward served out the unexpired term of John H. O’Hair. He afterward followed the dry goods trade one year, and during this time was engaged also in farming and dealing in stock. In 1869, he built the first pork-packing house in the city, and the same year, in company with T. A. Marshall and John W. True, he established the banking house of T. A. Marshall & Co., which was superseded by the Second National Bank two years later. In 1871, he, with John B. Hill and Thomas Stoddert, erected the Charleston Pork-Packing Houses, and he continued in the packing business until 1873, when he became President of the Second National Bank; he has served two terms as member of the Board of Supervisors. Mr. Johnson was first married Feb. 10, 1848, to Miss Harriet Jeffries, daughter of the late Thomas Jeffries, one of the early settlers of Coles Co.; she died April 14, 1853, leaving two children – Felix, now in the Second National Bank, and Emily, now wife of Charles E. Wilson,...

Biography of Judge William Cecil Price

William Cecil Price was born in Russell county, Virginia, April 1st, 1816, and is the third child of Crabtree and Linny C. Price, the family being of Welsh descent. His father was a farmer, who emigrated to Greene county, Missouri, in 1836. William had the advantage of a common English education in boyhood, and at twenty years of age was sent to Knoxville college, Tennessee. On returning from college he taught school in this county, and subsequently clerked in a general merchandise store, reading law whenever he had any spare time. In 1840 he was appointed deputy sheriff of Greene county, and one year later was appointed justice of the Greene county court, filling out an unexpired term. He was admitted to the bar in 1844, practiced law till 1847, and was then elected probate judge, holding the position for two years. In 1854 Judge Price was elected to the State Senate, but resigned in 1857 to accept appointment as judge of the 27th judicial circuit. In 1859 Gov. Stewart appointed him to represent Missouri as agent at the general land office at Washington, on the subject of swamp and overflowed lands, in which service he saved several hundred houses and acres of land for his State. President Buchanan appointed Judge Price, in 1860, to fill the unexpired term of Judge Casey as U. S. treasurer, which position he held till the inauguration of Lincoln. When the civil war came on, Judge Price being Southern in all his sentiments and interests, entered the Confederate service as a private under Gen. Price in McBride’s brigade, Missouri volunteers. He was captured...

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