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Biographical Sketch of William T. Coyne

William T. Coyne is one of the enterprising and up-to-date agriculturists of Rural Township, Rock Island County, and a member of one of the pioneer families. He is a native son of the County, having been born in Bowling Township June 16, 1861. He is a son of William and Margaret (Morrison) Coyne. Born on the farm, he has always followed that vocation. With a limited schooling he, by study and close observation, has gained through his own efforts a ready fund of general information, as well as a good working capital of special knowledge of use to him in his business. He was married in Rural Township March 8, 1893, to Miss Carrie M. Griffith. The latter was born in Rock Island January 23, 1870, the daughter of Elwood and Carrie E. (Baulch) Griffith, now of Rural. After his marriage Mr. Coyne settled on the farm he now occupies in Rural. The land at that time was badly run down and poorly improved, but by hard work and the application of advanced methods of agriculture he has brought the land to a high state of cultivation, and now owns two hundred and forty acres of the best producing ground in the vicinity, as well as one of the most comfort-able homes. In his political views Mr. Coyne is a staunch Republican. He stands high in the community as a citizen and neighbor, being best liked by those who know him...

Biography of Alexander E. Montgomery

Alexander E. Montgomery, well and favorably known for a generation past in Moline and Rock Island, was born February 2, 1831, in County Down, Ireland, and died in the City of Moline, Illinois, at his daughter’s (Mrs. Thornton’s) home, on Twelfth Avenue, July 17, 1906. His father and mother, James and Margaret (nee Swart,) were natives of Scotland, descended from Scotch-Irish ancestry, of honorable history. Mr. Montgomery received a common school education in his native land. In the year 1849, at fourteen years of age, he immigrated to New York City, and entered the service of the United States Hotel as bookkeeper. In the year 1853 he came west, and for seventeen years succeeding, lived on a farm in Rural Township, Illinois. At the expiration of this period, in 1870, Mr. Montgomery sold his farm, removed to Rock Island, and entered upon contract work for the United States Government, in connection with which he built the excellent rock road, which traverses the Arsenal between Moline and Davenport approaches. During the first year in this employment he resided part of the time in Rock Island and part of the time in Davenport; then taking up his abode in a dwelling on the Arsenal Island, belonging to the government, he continued in that residence until the house burned down July 21, 1898. Thenceforth Mr. Montgomery resided in Moline until his death, continuing an unbroken service with the government for the prolonged period of thirty-four years, during the earlier portion at the Arsenal Shops, and latterly as guard at the Moline Bridge, where his honest Scotch face and sturdy figure were a...

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