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Wyandot Indians

Wyandot Tribe: Meaning perhaps “islanders,” or “dwellers on a peninsula.” Occasionally spelled Guyandot. At an earlier date usually known as Huron, a name given by the French from hurĂ©, “rough,” and the depreciating suffix -on. Also called: Hatindiaβointen, Huron name of Huron of Lorette. Nadowa, a name given to them and many other Iroquoian tribes by Algonquians. Telamatenon, Delaware name, meaning “coming out of a mountain or cave.” Thastchetci’, Onondaga name. Connection. The Wyandot belonged to the Iroquoian linguistic family. Wyandot Location. The earliest known location of the Huron proper was the St. Lawrence Valley and the territory of the present province of Ontario from Lake Ontario across to Georgian Bay. The Tionontati were just west of them on Lake Huron. (See also Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin.) Wyandot Villages There are said to have been four confederated Huron tribes in the time of Champlain. Cartier, who first met these people, gives the following town names: Araste, on or near St. Lawrence River below the site of Quebec. Hagonchenda, on St. Lawrence River not far from the point where it is joined by Jacques Cartier River. Hochelaga, on Montreal Island. Hochelay, probably near Point Platon, Quebec. Satadin, location uncertain. Stadacona, on the site of the present Quebec. Starnatan, just below the site of Quebec. Tailla, near Quebec. Teguenondahi, location uncertain. Tutonaguay, 25 leagues above the site of Quebec. The following towns, some under their native names and others under the names of the missions established by the French Jesuits, existed in Ontario between Lake Simcoe and Georgian Bay in the first half of the seventeenth century Andiata....

Biographical Sketch of Albert R. Teachout

Teachout, Albert R.; mnfr. and merchant; born, Royalton, O., June, 12, 1852; son of Abraham and Julia Ann Tousley Teachout; educated, public schools and Hiram College; married, Bridgeport, Conn., Dec. 17, 1873, Sarah Parmly; issue, Kate P., Albert R., Jr., and David William; associated with his father in the mercantile business in Cleveland in the fall of 1873; business first known as A. R. Teachout & Son; in 1889, incorporated as The A. Teachout Co., manufacturers of and dealers in doors, glass, mantles, and interior finish; in forty years, the business has grown to large proportions. and the house now stands at the head in their line; pres. The Teachout Sash, Door & Glass Co., Columbus, O.; pres. Euclid Ave. Lumber Co., Broadway Lumber Co., Edgewater Lumber Co., and The Teachout Realty Co., Columbus, O.; trustee Hiram College, Ohio Christian Missionary Society, Women’s Hospital, Industrial School and Home; member Union Club. Recreation:...

Biography of Colonel Elhanan John Searle

Soldier, jurist and publicist, a man of many attainments and widely diversified talent, was Elhanan J. Searle, the subject of this sketch. He was born January 18, 1835, at Royalton, Ohio, coming to Rock Island County with his parents when about two years of age, and died at Rock Island, August 18, 1906. Colonel Searle, or Judge Searle as he was perhaps more familiar known throughout Rock Island County, received his education at the Rock River Seminary, an institution located at Mount Morris, Illinois, and after completing his studies in that school, which was largely preparatory in its scope, he entered Northwestern University at Evanston; from which institution he graduated with the highest honors of his class; and at the time of his death was the oldest alumnus of that institution. After the completion of his collegiate course he decided to fit himself for entrance to the legal profession, and with that end in view he entered the law office of John L. Beveridge, afterwards Governor of Illinois, at Chicago. He remained in Mr. Beveridge’s office until November, 1859, when he entered the law office of Abraham Lincoln and William H. Herndon, the firm being known as Lincoln & Herndon, at Springfield, and here he remained continuing the study of his chosen profession until March, 1861. Daily association with a character such as Abraham Lincoln’s and the intimacy naturally arising from their relation as student and mentor, must have made a deep impression upon the young man, and doubtless exerted a formative influence upon the whole course of his after life. As we can view it now, such an...

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