Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

Biography of John Short

JOHN SHORT. John Short, who is a native of east Tennessee, born in Roane County in 1826, but who has long been a resident of Stone County, is a son of Willis and Nancy (Kindrick) Short, who were also natives of east Tennessee, where they owned the farm upon which our subject was reared. The parents were hard-working, industrious people, and by their thrift and enterprise accumulated a fair competence. They passed their entire lives in their native State, the mother dying in 1873. Aaron Short, grandfather of our subject, was a native of Kentucky, but early moved to Tennessee, where he was an early settler. He was a Revolutionary soldier. Grandfather Kindrick was a farmer of Roane County, Tennessee, and there he and his wife passed their last days. To the parents of our subject were born fourteen children as follows: Franklin, an old settler and farmer of Stone County; Elias B., of Greene County; Melsena, the wife of Wesley McCullah, died in Stone County; Samuel, of Christian County; John, our subject; Jasper, died in Tennessee; William, was in the Federal Army and died in Virginia; Edom, of Tennessee; Julius, died in Clinton, Missouri, since the war; Jackson died in Tennessee; Lauriett of Tennessee; Diannah, died in Arkansas, and two others of whom no record is extant. In the district school our subject received a limited education and remained with his parents until 1850, when he married Miss Lydia Coleman, a native of Roane County, Tennessee, and the daughter of William and Elizabeth Coleman, natives of Tennessee. The following children were born to this union: George W., a...

Biography of M. C. Reynolds

M. C. REYNOLDS, the most prominent merchant in Douglas County, has made his home in this section of the country since 1856, but was born in Roane County, East Tennessee, December 30, 1844, a son of J . A. G. and Eliza (Miller) Reynolds, who were also Tennesseans by birth. The mother died when the subject of this sketch was about eight years old, a daughter of Dobson Miller, who was one of the early settlers of Tennessee. J. A. G. Reynolds was a member of an early family of Tennessee, but in 1856 became a resident of Douglas County, Missouri, settling on a farm six miles north of Ava. He served in the State militia during the war, and died in 1892, at the age of sixty-six. He and his wife became the parents of three children: Mary J. is the wife of W. C. Kelton and lives in Berry County; M. C., and Mira, who became the wife of William Hartley and is now dead. For his second wife Mr. Reynolds took a sister of his first wife, and two children were born of this union, only one of whom grew to maturity, J. D., who is a merchant of Mansfield, Missouri. The subject of this sketch passed his boyhood days in Tennessee, and after coming to Missouri was engaged in tilling the soil until after the opening of the Civil War. When the town of Ava was established he came to the place and opened a mercantile establishment, to which he has given his time and attention up to the present. Although he started in business...

Biography of Thomas L. Viles

THOMAS L. VILES. To attain success in any calling, it is necessary that a man should be possessed of a keen and discerning mind, with the energy and determination to push his business or profession instead of allowing it to push him. These qualities are possessed in an eminent degree by Thomas L. Viles, who is the able prosecuting attorney of Stone County, in which he has made his home for many years. He is a native of Roane County, Tennessee, where he was born October 3, 1850. The son of John and Martha (Roberts) Viles, who were also Tennesseans. They left the State of their birth when their son Thomas L. was a small boy, and located in Illinois; but after remaining in that State for two years, came to Missouri, and in 1854 took up their residence in Stone County, in the northern part of which they settled on a farm, being among its pioneer settlers. In 1862 they moved to Christian County, Missouri, and there the mother was called from life the same year; she was a devoted member of the Baptist Church. The father enlisted in the Fourteenth Missouri Cavalry, and served about eighteen months, first as orderly sergeant, for a few months, and then as first lieutenant of Company F. His regiment was consolidated with the Eighth Missouri Regiment in 1863, and then, receiving honorable discharge, returned home. He saw some hard fighting during his service, and was a faithful and valuable soldier. After the war was over, he began farming in Christian County and there made his home with the three children left...

Biography of James Harlin Hale

JAMES HARLIN HALE. In all ages of the world industry, perseverance and energy, where intelligently applied, have achieved results which could only have been gained by having one end in view, and by improving every opportunity of ultimately attaining that object. Mr. Hale is an example of what can be accomplished when the spirit of determination is exercised, in connection with the every-day affairs of life. His farming and stockraising operations have resulted most satisfactorily, and he is one of the substantial men of his section. Like so many of the representative men of Christian County, Mr. Hale is a Tennessean, born in Washington County, October 10, 1832. His parents, Mark and Polly (Mulkey) Hale, were natives of that county also, the former born in 1809 and the latter in 1811. They were reared and married in that county, and, when our subject was a boy, they removed to Barren County, Kentucky, where Mrs. Hale died two years later. Mr. Hale returned to Tennessee, and was married in McMinn County, that State, to Miss Long. Soon after, he removed to Barren County, Kentucky, where he made his home until 1850, at which date he removed to McMinn County, Tennessee, and thence to Bradley County the following year. In 1852 he came to what is now Christian County, Missouri, but later settled in Stone County, where he remained until 1858, when he returned to Barren County, Kentucky His death occurred about 1870. He was a blacksmith, and followed that trade all his life. He was married three times. His second wife became the mother of two children: John and Henry....

Biography of Hon. John L. Greene

HON. JOHN L. GREENE. This well-known and prominent citizen of Pike Creek Valley is a native of Roane County, Tennessee, where he was born in 1835, a son of Theodrick and Mary (Hassler) Greene, natives of Pittsylvania County, Virginia, and Tennessee, born in 1799 and 1805 respectively. In 1811 Theodrick Greene was taken by his parents to Tennessee, grew to manhood there and was there married. In 1857 they removed to Marion County, Arkansas, by wagon and there the father spent the rest of his life, being killed during the war while at home. He was a Southern sympathizer and by occupation was a farmer. He was captain of a company of militia in an early day and led an active and busy life. His father, Thomas Greene, was a native of Virginia, but died in Roane County, Tennessee, a farmer. His wife, Amy (Kissee) Greene also died there. They reared a large family and two of their sons, William and John, were soldiers in the War of 1812. Michael Hassler, the maternal grandfather of the subject of this sketch, came to Tennessee from New York in an early day, was of German descent, and followed farming and milling until his death. His wife, Agnes Scarboro, also died in Roane County. The wife of Theodrick Greene died in Sharpe County, Arkansas, in 1880, having become the mother of eight sons and five daughters: Michael was with Gen. Price during the war and is a resident of Boone County, Arkansas; Thomas J. died before the war in Roane County, Tennessee, leaving a family; Jonathan died in California in 1851 or...

Biography of Andrew J. Farmer

ANDREW J. FARMER (deceased). When a citizen of worth and character has departed from this life, it is meet that those who survive him should keep in mind his life work, and should hold up to the knowledge and emulation of the young his virtues and the characteristics which distinguished him and made him worthy the esteem of his neighbors. Therefore, the name of Andrew J. Farmer is presented to the readers of this volume as a public-spirited citizen and a man well and favorably known throughout the county. He was born in Roane County, Tennessee, in 1824, and at an early date came to Missouri, being the first of the family to settle in this county. This was about 1845 and he made his home here until his death in 1862. He was a son of Archibald Farmer, who was also a native of Tennessee, the family being an old and prominent one of that State. Our subject grew to mature years in his native State, received his education there, and was there married to Miss Nancy (Preston) Farmer, a native of the Big Bend State, born in Roane County in 1826. As above stated, Mr. and Mrs. Farmer came to Missouri in 1845, making the trip by wagon, and took up land near the present site of Sparta. Mr. Farmer was a prominent man of this county, held a number of local offices and was county assessor at the time of his death, being elected to that position by the Republican party. Active and enterprising, upright and honorable, he was universally respected, and became one of the...

Biography of Andrew P. Miller

ANDREW P. MILLER, one of the early pioneers of Douglas County, and son of Dobson Miller (see sketch of Dr. H. M. Miller and J. W. Miller, of Ava), came originally from Tennessee, his birth occurring in Roane County, that State, May 26, 1833. He was about twenty-one years of age when he left the State where he had received his education, and made his way to Missouri, where he has since followed farming. In the year 1862 he enlisted in Company B, of the Home Guards, but about a year later he enlisted in the Missouri State Militia, and served ninety days. After that he enlisted in the Rangers, and served throughout the war, being discharged in 1865. He was in a number of fights and skirmishes with bushwhackers in the mountain regions of south Missouri, and was disabled by hardship, so that he still suffers from complaints contracted during that memorable time. He served his flag well, and was a good and brave soldier. In 1867 he bought the farm where he now resides, and has 120 acres of well-improved land. He has made a success of farming, and is also a successful stockman. In politics he affiliates with the Republican party, and is an active worker for his party. Mr. Miller is deeply interested in educational matters, and for nine years has been director in his district. Socially he is an Odd Fellow, being a member of the order at Ava. While a resident of Tennessee he was married to Miss Mary J. Brazeale, a native of Tennessee, born September 18, 1838, and the daughter of...

Biography of Judge George F. Chilton

JUDGE GEORGE F. CHILTON. To become distinguished at the bar requires not only capacity, but also sound judgment and persevering industry. These qualifications are combined in no gentleman at the Shannon County bar to a greater extent than in George F. Chilton. A careful and accurate adviser, and an earnest and conscientious advocate, his success at the bar has been achieved by the improvement of opportunities, by untiring diligence, and by close study and correct judgment of men and motives. The Chilton family is an old and prominent one in the history of Missouri, for certain members of this family were among the earliest of the early settlers of this State. Truman Chilton, grandfather of our subject, was a native of that grand old State, Virginia, but at an early date he moved to Roane County, Tennessee, and thence to Shannon County, Missouri, in 1837. He was one of the very first to settle here. He had lost his wife in Tennessee, and as his elder brother, Thomas Chilton, had already settled in Shannon County, Missouri, he came on and made his home with him until 1841. He and his brother and a cousin served in the War of 1812. Stockraising and farming were their principal occupations, and Truman Chilton followed these until his death in 1843, when sixty-three years of age. His son, Thomas T. Chilton, was a native of Virginia, and was but a child when his father moved to Roane County, Tennessee There he grew to mature years, and there he was married to Miss Sophia Larew, a native of east Tennessee. In 1841 he and...

Biography of James. E. Webb

JAMES. E. WEBB. Special adaptability to any calling in life is the one necessary adjunct to permanent success, and as a tiller of the soil James E. Webb seems to be “to the manner born,” for he has one of the finest farms on the Sylamore River, of which he has become the owner through his own efforts. He was born in Roane County, Tennessee, in 1825, a son of Allen and Rebecca (Webb) Webb, the former of whom was born in the Old North State, and the latter is supposed to have been born in east Tennessee. After residing in Roane County for some time they moved to Bradley County, Tennessee, in 1855 or 1856, and then came to Arkansas and took up their residence in Hempstead County, where they lived and died, having followed the occupation of farming throughout life. The immediate subject of this sketch received his education in Roane and Bradley Counties, Tennessee, and when a young man of nineteen years he commenced farming in the last named county on his own responsibility, and there continued to till the soil until 1859, when he came to Arkansas, and from that time up to 1860 tilled the soil in Hempstead County, since which time he has resided in Stone County, and has made his home on his present fine farm of 400 acres since 1869. This land is exceptionally productive, and on the 125 acres that are under cultivation large crops are raised annually. The place is well improved also, and besides good farm buildings of all kinds the fences are sightly and substantial; in fact,...

Biography of Isaac Preston Looney

ISAAC PRESTON LOONEY. The subject of this biographical notice is an honorable and progressive farmer, and as such no name in the memorial department of this work is more worthy of mention. He was born in Roane County, Tennessee, in 1831, a son of John and Lucinda (Edrington) Looney, both of whom were natives of east Tennessee. The father was a carpenter and farmer by occupation, and when the subject of this sketch was a child removed with his family to Franklin County, Ala., and there made his home until 1853. They next located in Smith County, Tex., where both parents eventually passed from life, the father at the age of fifty-one and the mother when fifty-four years of age. Isaac Preston Looney was the eldest of their nine children, and attained manhood in Franklin County, Ala. In 1852 he left home and came to Arkansas with the intention of making his home here, and made his first location near Timbo on what is now Frank’s place. He did most of the clearing on that land, but left that place in 1865 and lived near Mt. View until 1868, hen he located on the farm on which he now resides, which consists of 130 acres of some of the finest land in the county. In May, 1862, he joined Schaler’s regiment, Company F, with which he served faithfully for two years as lieutenant. He then returned home and joined Coffee’s regiment, and was from first to last with Gen. Price. He took part in many skirmishes and was in all the principal battles of the Price raid through Missouri....
Page 1 of 212

Pin It on Pinterest