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Illinois, Diocese of Belleville, Catholic Parish Records, 1695-1956

A help guide for accessing the images of parish registers recording the events of baptism, first communion, confirmation (to 1907), marriage (to 1930) or death (to 1956) in the Diocese of Belleville (Illinois), Roman Catholic Church. The index to some volumes may reference pages within a given volume beyond current publication dates. As such, these images are not currently available. In addition to traditional parish registers, this collection includes a small number of census, church history, family and financial records. To assist the researcher I have broken down the available registers by county and name of parish, including the years covered by those parish records.

Biography of James Calvin Morrow

James Calvin Morrow. In the death of James Calvin Morrow, which occurred at Washington July 4, 1912, there passed away one of the men whose works and influence have been most conspicuous in the development of both the City and County of Washington. He was a pioneer in the best sense of the term, a hard worker, a good manager of men, a keen and resoureeful business man, and especially faithful and efficient in the performance of his civic responsibilities and his obligations to friends and family. It is only a matter of simple justice to refer to him as one of the most successful and influential men of affairs in Northern Kansas. As a banker and leader in political life he gained wealth and influence, but it is proper to emphasize the fact that to the end he remained an unassuming, kind and generous man, who possessed the esteem of all who knew him and the affection of his friends and close associates. His death occurred in his sixty-seventh year. He was born near the Town of Washington in Guernsey County, Ohio, April 3, 1846, a son of William and Elizabeth (Roberts) Morrow. He had personality and individual attributes of his own, but he also exemplified those sturdy and splendid qualities of an old and honorable American ancestry. Most of his forebears were farmers and as a family both in the maternal and paternal line were noteworthy for their patriotism. They developed portions of the wilderness in various successive frontiers of America and there were fighters of the family connection in the French and Indiana wars, the War...

Biographical Sketch of William H. F. Gabe

William H. F. Gabe. The local history of the city of Beloit will always find it necessary to make reference to Mr. William H. F. Gabe, who was one of the pioneers in that section of Mitchell County and his early experiences and the work with which he had been connected have been a part of the development and upbuilding of the state. It was in 1870 that he brought his bride to Mitchell County. Both he and his wife were born in Germany, he in 1837 and she in 1844. They came to the United States in 1868 and in the following year were happily married in Richland County, Illinois. On coming to Kansas in 1870 Mr. Gabe took up a homestead in Mitchell County. Some of that land is now included in the City of Beloit. The first year of the family residence in Mitchell County Mr. Gabe excavated a dugout which served as the family habitation for a year. In the second year he built a substantial stone house. The first town meeting was held in Mr. Gabe’s home. He and his wife also boarded the hands who operated the first sawmill in that section. Mr. Gabe recalls the fact that during 1870 the settlers were much alarmed by the different Indian hunting parties, though there was no real danger, However, only a year or two before two of the Bell children had been captured and taken away by the Indians, and that incident was sufficient to make the early settlers very cautions in their dealings with the Red Men for several years. In 1871 Mr....

Biography of Charles W. Kent

Charles W. Kent of Coffeyville is a veteran newspaper man of Kansas. His has been an interesting past. He served as a boy soldier in the Union army, and several of his brothers also bore arms for the Stars and Stripes. In a half century of active experience he has largely been identified with the newspaper business, and has been in Southern Kansas about a quarter of a century. On July 7, 1893, he established and brought out the Gate City Independent, the forerunner of the present weekly Independent. For a number of years Coffeyville was familiarly known as the Gate City, since it was in fact the gateway leading from Kansas into old Indian Territory. Since its establishment Mr. Kent has been sole owner and editor of this old and influential newspaper. He now has a modern plant and equipment at 208 East Ninth Street. He also owns the building from which the paper is published. Starting out with a weekly issue, six months later Mr. Kent changed it to a semi-weekly paper, and six months later still he made it a dally and semi-weekly. Since the Spanish-American war the daily has been discontinued and in 1908 he abandoned the semi-weekly edition. It is now a weekly, and this change was made largely to adapt the paper to the needs and demands of the farming community surrounding Coffeyville. The Independent has a splendid country circulation, and goes to patrons on the farms and in the nearby towns all over Southeastern Kansas and Northern Oklahoma. It is essentially a home newspaper and specializes in news of the farms and...

Biography of Timothy S. Givan

Timothy S. Givan, editor and proprietor of the Tullahoma Messenger, one of the prominent weekly papers of Middle Tennessee, was born in Hardin County, October 8, 1845. He is the son of James M. and Mellona (Needham) Givan, both of whom were born in Kentucky, the former November 4, 1811, and the latter September 19, 1819. The parents, married October 9, 1834, had ten children born to them, six of whom were boys, and of these our subject is the youngest. The mother died April 4, 1854, and in 1856 the father married Rachael Clark. He died October 5, 1859. The childhood days of our subject were spent on the farm, and at the age of ten years he entered the office of the Cloverport (Kentucky) Journal, where he served an apprenticeship of four years. Previous to the breaking out of the civil war, he taught a term of five months in his native state, and when the crisis came, enlisted in the Federal Army, joining at first, Company I, Thirty seventh Regiment of Kentucky Mounted Infantry, and later, the Sixteenth and Second Regiments of United States Regulars. He was subsequently commissioned teacher and chaplain of the Second United States Regulars, and also post chaplain and librarian for the garrison at Mobile, Alabama. At the close of the war he returned to Kentucky and re-entered the newspaper business in the position of local editor of the Kentucky Intelligencer, published by W. D. Givan, his brother, first at Munfordsville, and afterward at Caverna. In 1870 he purchased the material of the Kentucky Templar and Kentucky Presbyterian, and removed the same...

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