Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

Biography of Frank T. Nelson

Among the enterprising and progressive citizens, and successful horticulturists that are doing so much toward building up and placing before the world the horticultural interests and industries of Riverside and San Bernardino County, mention should be made of the above named gentleman. Mr. Nelson came to San Bernardino County in 1863, and located at Redlands. There he purchased a twenty-acre tract of uncultivated land and commenced its improvement. He planted the tract with orange trees, and made one of the representative groves of that section. He sold the tract at a good price in 1887, and in the same year came to Riverside and invested in lands. He is the owner of thirty acres of land on the west side of Bandini avenue, upon which he has his residence; six acres of the land is in orange trees, five or six years old; the balance is bottom land, which is principally devoted to alfalfa. This bottom laud has a water right of some twenty-five inches from Spring Brook. He has also a ten-acre tract on the west side of Cypress Avenue, which is one of the finest orange groves in the section. There are six acres of seedling oranges upon that tract, the trees are sixteen years old, and under his skillful care and cultivation are giving good returns, giving a yield that net him $500 per acre. Four acres are in budded fruit that are varying age and not in full bearing. He is a thoroughly practical man, and in his orange growing spares no labor or expense in cultivation and fertilization, that his experience and business principles...

Biographical Sketch of F. P. Morrison

F. P. Morrison, President of the First National Bank of Redlands, is a “native son of the Golden West,” being born in the city of San Francisco. His father, A. L. Morrison, came from Ohio in 1854, and was a successful businessman for many years. The subject of this sketch came to Redlands in 1882. He had considerable money, and being pleased with the location, and believing that there was a bright future for the place, he bought forty acres of land and put out 300 orange trees the first year. The improvements he has since made on this place can be better appreciated by a visit than by any written description, how-ever elaborate. No one should visit Redlands without a drive around Mr. Morrison’s home, and no one will go away without remarking that it is the most beautiful place in the valley. His place is supplied with water from Redlands Company and also Bear Valley certificates. Mr. Morrison established the bank in 1886. The officers are: president, F. P. Morrison; cashier, J. W. Wilson; vice president, A. T. Park. The directors are Frank Hinckley, G. A. Cook, George A. Crafts, H. L. Drew and J. S. Ed-wards. Mr. Morrison is treasurer of the city...

Biography of Benton O. Johnson

Benton O. Johnson, one of Redlands best known and highly respected citizens, is a native of Connecticut, born at Bethlehem, April 20, 1855. His parents were David and Sophia (Stone) Johnson, both of whom came of old Connecticut families, and the father a merchant. B. O. Johnson was but two years of age when his parents removed to the South. They resided at various places throughout the Southern country, among them New Orleans, Matamoras, Brownsville, etc., and the outbreak of the civil war found the elder Johnson carrying on the dry-goods business. In 1863 the family left the South and returned to Connecticut, trade being much interfered with on account of the war. They located at Middlebury, whence they afterward removed to West Haven. At the last named place and at New Haven, the subject of this sketch was educated. He commenced his business career as a drug clerk with Dr. Shepherd, at West Haven, with whom he continued for five years; then went in business for himself at Deep River, Connecticut. There he remained until 1883, when he came to California, locating at Redlands. He followed ranching two years, but then gave it up to resume mercantile life. He purchased the store formerly conducted by George A. Cook, in Lugonia, and was in business there until February, 1889, when he sold out to V. L. Mitchell, with whose establishment he is now connected. He was married at West Haven, Connecticut, September 14, 1880, to Miss Minnie R. Brown, sister of F. E. Brown, of Redlands. They have two children, viz.: Hazel and Walter. Mr. Johnson has built two...

Biography of Simeon Cook

Simeon Cook, of Redlands, is a native of Richmond, Cheshire County, New Hampshire, born April 14, 1821; his parents being Simeon, Sr., and Rachel (Holman) Cook. Both parents came of old New England families, and the father of our subject went with his parents from Billingham, Massachusetts, to New Hampshire, when he was but three years of age. He was born December 8, 1770, and died March 18, 1859. Our subject’s mother was the daughter of Elijah Holman, who lived on the line between Winchester and Richmond, New Hampshire, and before her marriage to Simeon Cook, Sr., was the widow of Ebenezer Barnes. She died March 18, 1839. Simeon Cook, whose name heads this sketch, spent his early boy-hood days on the farm at his native place. He attended public schools at Richmond, and private schools at Winchester and Swansea, after which he attended the Academy at Amherst. When twenty years old he went to Boston, where he was engaged for seven months as a clerk in the grocery store of Robert Cummings. He next went to Waltham, where for a year he was in a general store with Robert Cummings, in Old Rumford Hall. From there he returned to Boston, and engaged in the grocery business on Chambers street at the head of Poplar, in partnership with a nephew. After three years there he sold out to his partner and went back to Richmond, where he conducted an old-fashioned country store for some eight or ten years. He then disposed of that business and engaged in manufacturing hogsheads for the Cuban market. He originated this business at Richmond,...

Biographical Sketch of Eugene B. Waite

Eugene B. Waite, one of the enterprising young men of Redlands, has been a resident of the Golden State since 1882, and owns a fruit ranch on Cajon avenue and Palm street. He was born in Walworth County, Wisconsin, in December 1860. His parents, Russell and Adaline (Herrick) Waite, were from Genesee County, New York. His father was successfully engaged in farming and stock-raising in Wisconsin for over thirty years. He is now retired from business and resides on the corner of Seventh and E streets. Our subject first went into the nursery business in Redlands with his brother, but has since sold his interest and given his attention to mining and prospecting in Alaska and Aleutian...

Biographical Sketch of C. E. Owen

C. E. Owen, a pioneer of 1849, residing on the corner of Olive and Eureka streets, Redlands, was born in Sheffield, Ohio. March 16, 1840, he left Ohio for California, shipping his horses and wagons to Chicago. At St. Joe, Missouri, he traded his horses for oxen. He left Iowa Point, May 10, 1849, with a company consisting of 100 wagons, and September 10 of the same year they arrived in the Sacramento valley with eighty-three wagons, under Captain Dorland. Mr. Owen can tell some interesting incidents of the journey across the plains, and of his experiences as a miner in the early days. For several years he engaged in buying and selling cattle and in the butcher business in Placer and Shasta counties. After this he again went to mining. In 1851 he went into the mercantile business at French Gulch, Shasta County, and lost heavily. He then went to the mines. After leaving the mines he followed the cattle business for twenty years, and at the end of that time went to farming in Napa valley, where he remained five years. In 1873 he came to San Bernardino County and purchased thirty acres of land on Base Line and A streets, which he improved and afterward sold, and purchased twenty-five acres in Redlands. Here he has a most beautiful orange orchard of fourteen acres, which is beginning to yield a handsome income, and here he expects to spend the rest of his days. He has been twice married, but has no children, except an adopted daughter, who is an artist and a teacher in the public...

Biographical Sketch of E. J. Waite

E. J. Waite is a native of Walworth County, Wisconsin, and came to California in 1876, locating at Riverside, where he remained until 1879. In March 1882, he came to Redlands and worked as foreman for Judson S. Brown. It was he who planted the first orange trees in Redlands, and he has planted and raised more orange trees than any other man in the place. He owns several lots in the city and the finest nursery stock in the whole valley. His property has all been secured by planting and caring for trees for other parties, and taking lots and lands in payment. He is a thorough horticulturist. In August 1889, Mr. Waite married Miss Catherine E. Jones, of Bureau County, Illinois, but, at the time of her marriage, a teacher in the public schools of Crafton. She was educated at the high school of Tiskilwa and graduated at the Northwestern Normal...

Biographical Sketch of Harvey Hewitt

Harvey Hewitt, residing three miles northwest of Redlands, was born in Cleveland, Ohio, in 1859. His father, Isaac L. Hewitt, was a native of New York, and for fifteen years was senior member of the firm of Hewitt & Schofield, petroleum commission. At one time he owned a line of steamers on Lake Erie. He is now retired from active life. He had five children, the subject of our sketch being the fourth. He was educated at the Polytechnic Institute at Brooklyn, New York. He was connected with the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad, on the engineer corps, for two years. He came to Lugonia in 1881 and purchased 240 acres of land, 100 of which he now has under cultivation. At present he is deputy surveyor of San Bernardino...

Biographical Sketch of H. H. Sinclair

H. H. Sinclair, Redlands, was born in Brooklyn, New York, in 1858. He attended the public schools of that city, and afterward went to Cornell University, and was a member of the class of 1880. Subsequent to this he practiced law in New York City for two years. Then he engaged in the shipping business for a while. His health failing he came to California, and has since given his attention to his fine orange orchard in Lugonia. He is a member of the city council of Redlands, and was a member of the first board. He is also a member of the executive committee of the Board of Trade. He is secretary of the Lugonia Water Company, also of the Sunnyside Ditch Company. He is secretary and director of the Redlands Fruit Growers’ Association. In his early life he followed the sea for three years, from the age of fifteen to eighteen years, and was made second mate. In 1882 he was married to Agnes Rowley, of New York City. Mr. Sinclair has the largest and oldest orange orchard in the valley, and is still enlarging its...

Biography of Prof. Charles Russell Paine

Prof. Charles Russell Paine, of Redlands, is a native of Massachusetts, born in Barnstable September 9, 1839, a son of John and Lucy (Crowell) Paine. He is one of a family of six children. He was graduated at Amherst College, and has taught in Maine, Rhode Island, Ohio, Indiana and California. He came to this latter State in 1870 and taught school in Riverside. He also taught the first school in Colton. In 1873 he established a private school in San Bernardino and in 1876 was elected County Superintendent of Schools. He subsequently served as principal of the city schools two terms. Prof. Paine and his father-in-law, Dr. Craig, came to California to raise fruit in Riverside. They drove from Los Angeles and took up eighty acres of barren land, on which they built rude houses, and then went back to Los Angeles for their families, and theirs were the first families to live on the lower plain. The Professor tells an amusing incident which occurred just as they were crossing the Santa Ana river, how that his brother-in-law, Scipio Craig, now editor of the Citrograph, fell out of the wagon into the water. Also, how later he and Scipio had raised a crop of corn on the island in the river, and when it was almost ready to gather the Mexican cattle invaded the corn and barley, and they could only go in with wagons and haul off as much as they could, and let the cattle destroy the rest. The Professor can tell many interesting stories of pioneer life, which, could they all be written, would make...
Page 1 of 41234

Pin It on Pinterest