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Biography of Charles A. Leavy, M. D.

Dr. Charles A. Leavy, who in the practice of medicine is specializing on diseases of the ear, nose and throat in St. Louis, was born in Palmyra, Missouri, September 25, 1873. His father, the late James Leavy, was a native of St. Louis, where his father, who was of Irish descent, settled at a very early day. James Leavy was a sculptor who won professional prominence and he was also a Civil war veteran who served with the rank of corporal in Company G, Thirtieth Missouri Volunteer Infantry for three and a half years, being wounded in the battle of Vicksburg. He died in Louisiana, Missouri, in 1911, when at the age of sixty-three years. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Mary Saunders, was a native of Palmyra, Missouri, and died in 1880 at the age of thirty-eight years. In the family were three children, two of whom were daughters. Dr. Leavy, the second in order of birth, acquired a district school education in Ralls county and then attended the high school at New London, Missouri, and the Chillicothe (Mo.) Normal School, spending three years as a pupil in the latter institution. At length he determined upon the practice of medicine as a life work and was graduated from the Marion Sims Beaumont Medical College of St. Louis in 1903 with the M I. D. degree. He took up the profession of teaching, which he followed in Ralls county for three years prior to beginning the study of medicine and following his graduation from the Medical College he became clinical instructor in the St. Louis University, a...

Biography of Henry Jackson Waters

There is perhaps no man in Missouri more competent to speak with authority upon the question of scientific production in connection with the farm and the dairy than is Professor Henry Jackson Waters, who for a long period has made a very close study of the many topics relative to this broad field of labor. He was born in Center, Missouri, November 23, 1865, and in the acquirement of his education won the degree of Bachelor of Agriculture from the Missouri State University in 1886. In the same year he was appointed assistant secretary of the Missouri State Board of Agriculture, serving until the following year, and in 1837 he became assistant director of agriculture at the Missouri experimental station, where he continued his labors until 1891. In the following year he was appointed to the professorship of agriculture in the State University of Pennsylvania, where he continued his work as an instructor until 1895. In 1896 he was dean of the College of Agriculture and Mechanical Arts of Missouri and also director of the experimental station, thus continuing until 1909. Through the succeeding nine years he was president of the Kansas State Agricultural College, doing much to improve the course of instruction and render the work of the institution of the greatest practical avail. In the meantime he had had further study abroad, going to Liepzic, Germany, where he remained in 1904-5 and in the latter year he also studied for a time in Zurich, Switzerland, thus gaining knowledge of the most advanced scientific methods followed in the old world. In 1913 the New Hampshire State College conferred...

Biography of W. L. Stowers

W. L. STOWERS. A popular resort for the traveling public and people of this city is the West Plains Hotel, which was first opened in 1883, and is conducted by W. L. Stowers, one of the prominent business men in the city. Mr. Stowers, who is a most genial and obliging host, was born in Marion County, Missouri, August 2, 1843, son of Samuel and America (Whaley) Stowers. Samuel Stowers was born in Virginia in 18O5 to the union of Colman and Nancy (Conway) Stowers, natives of the Old Dominion. The grandfather came to Ralls County, Missouri, as early as 1825 and followed farming, but he was a manufacturer of machinery while residing in Virginia. He was one among the early pioneers of Missouri, and made his home in Ralls County until his death in 1853. He was with the old Whig party and was a prominent man in the county. His wife died in Ralls County about 1851 or 1852, and they were members of the old Ironside Baptist Church. Three daughters and two sons were born to them: Anna, Susan, Nellie, Thomas and Samuel. None of these are living. Samuel Stowers, father of subject, was a young man when he came to this State, this being a year or so before his father came, and he settled in Ralls County and married Miss Whaley. From there they moved to Marion County, and there Mrs. Stowers died in 1847. Two years later Mr. Stowers emigrated overland to California and took his oldest son, Thomas Coleman Stowers, with him. He made the trip in about nine months, and he...

Biography of William F. Webster

The social, political and business history of this section is filled with the deeds and doings of self-made men, and no man in Stone County, Missouri, is more deserving the appellation than Mr. W. F. Webster, for he marked out his own career in youth and has steadily followed it up to the present, his prosperity being attributable to his earnest and persistent endeavor, and to the fact that he has already consistently tried to follow the teachings of the “Golden Rule.” He is a native Missourian, born in Ralls County, June 18, 1828, The eldest but one of four children born to the marriage of Elizure D. and Jane (Fourman) Webster. The grandfather, Daniel Webster, who was related to the famous Daniel Webster, was a native of the Old Bay State, and he was with Jackson at the battle of New Orleans. He and wife died in Massachusetts, within twelve miles of Boston, where the family was a noted one. The father of our subject was born in Massachusetts in 1799, and when eighteen years of age, or in 1817, he turned his face west-ward and settled in Ralls County, Missouri, where he soon became the owner of a farm. He learned the blacksmith’s trade, was handy with tools, and could work at the millwright’s trade as well as at all kinds of wood work. Mr. Webster was married in Ralls County to Miss Jane Fourman, and later settled in Monroe County, Missouri,where, in connection with farming, he followed black smithing, and ran a water mill on Salt River. There he resided until 1845, when he moved to...

Millering, Della (Kindred) – Obituary

Della Millering, La Grande, died Wednesday at Valley View Manor. She was 90. Mrs. Millering was born Dec. 2, 1892, in Perry, Mo., the daughter of James and Damietta (Long) Kindred. She came to the Grande Ronde Valley in 1905. She married Frank Earl Millering on May 31, 1914, in La Grande. She was preceded in death by her husband in 1930 and a son, Avery Millering in 1975. Mrs. Millering was a member of the First Christian Church. Survivors include a daughter, Mrs. Vincent (Darlene) Gibson, and a daughter-in-law, Cinda Millering, both of La Grande, five grandchildren and six great grandchildren and other relatives. Graveside services will be Friday at 2:30 p.m. at the Hillcrest Cemetery with the Rev. Jack Hart of the First Christian Church officiating. Friends may call at Daniels Valley Funeral Chapel today from 4-9 p.m. Memorial contributions may be made in memory of Della Millering to the First Christian Church memorial fund in care of Daniels Chapel. The Observer La Grande, Oregon Thursday, February 17, 1983 Page...

Biography of Henry Jackson Waters

Henry Jackson Waters, president of the Kansas State Agricultural College at Manhattan since 1909, is a leader in that group of men who have served to elevate and dignify the science of agriculture. His work and influence are of growing value every passing year. His reputation is by no means confined to Kansas and Missouri, the states in which most of his work had been done. The agricultural journals and writers all over the country are coming to pay special attention and respect to any movement or experiment with which the name Henry Jackson Waters is in any way associated. Professor Waters was born at Center in Ralls County, Missouri, November 23, 1865, and is a son of the late George Washington and Lavinia Jane (Smith) Waters. His grandfather, George Waters, was a Tennesseean, moved from Wilson in that state to Missouri in 1829, and after a short residence in Pike County moved to a farm in Ralls County, where he not only followed farming but also preached as a minister of the Gospel. Professor Waters comes from a long line of agriculturists, and his father in particular was for years a noted authority on many phases of agriculture, and gained the reputation of being an expert not so much from his association with the former schools and laboratories of agriculture as from the stern school of practical experience. The late Col. George W. Waters was born in Ralls County, Missouri, August 1, 1836, and died at his home in Hope, Arkansas, February 23, 1906. He was reared in a country district, attended local schools, also an academy at...

Biography of Dr. Thomas Jefferson Bailey

Dr. Bailey was a native of Kentucky, born in Lincoln county, January 17, 1803, whith his father, John Bailey, had removed with his family from Virginia. There the father died, and Thomas J. grew up to manhood. He read medicine at Danville under the able preceptor ship of Drs. Smith and McDowell, till he was prepared for practice. Prior to removing to Missouri, in 1828, he married Miss Harriet Sproul, a native of the same county as himself. He settled first in Ralls county, this State, where he practiced medicine till 1837, removing thence to Springfield, when that town was a mere hamlet. Both himself and wife were well pleased, and, resolving to stay, located on a forty-acre tract between the two cities of Springfield. Here he began a most successful professional career, and for nearly a quarter of a century ministered to the sick in his plain, simple way that built him the large practice out of which he realized a fortune. His sympathetic disposition and moderate charges made him beloved of all, no one ever complaining of excessive bills. His plain style won confidence, and he was never a man to judge others by dress or outward appearance; but always looked within to find the man. He thoroughly believed that ” ‘Twas not in rank or wealth or state, but ‘get up and get’ that makes men great.” Dr. Bailey was a staunch Whig, who found foe men worthy of his steel in such Democrats as John S. Phelps, John P. Campbell, Nicholas R. Smith, and several others of Springfield and vicinity, with whom he coped all alone for several years,...

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