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Biography of Alfred Gray

Alfred Gray, a pioneer of Topeka and always active in promoting the agricultural and industrial interests of the state, was born at Evans, Erie County, New York, December 5, 1830. He was educated in his native state, and in the spring of 1857 located at Quindaro, Kansas. Mr. Gray was a member of the first State Legislature; was secretary of the Kansas State Board of Agriculture from 1872 to 1880, and was one of the commissioners to the Contennial Exposition at Philadelphia. His death occurred at Topeka on January 23, 1880, and his memorial monument stands in the cemetery at...

Biography of Kate L. Cowick

Miss Kate L. Cowick, now serving her second term as county treasurer of Wyandotte County, probably had the most responsible office of any woman in Kansas. She had the business efficiency needed in the administration of such an office. She is thoroughly trained in the public service, having for many years been a teacher and administrative official of schools, and her work as county treasurer had given her not a little of justly earned fame among the women of Kansas. Miss Cowick is a native of Missouri, born at Tarkio in Atchison County on February 8, 1885. She was the youngest of the three children of Samuel R. and Katherine (Travers) Cowick. Her mother was born in the South of England and went with her parents to Ireland and from there to the State of Illinois, where she was reared and where she married Samuel R. Cowick. Samuel R. Cowick was for many years a well known flgure in newspaper work. He was editor of a Missouri paper and subsequently moved to Trego County, Kansas, locating at Wakeeny, when that town was on the frontier. There he was connected with the Western Kansas World, a paper which was established in 1879 and is the oldest journad of the county. The family had their home in Wakeeny for fourteen years, when Samuel R. Cowick moved to Lyndon, Osage County, and for three years was proprietor of the Lyndon Herald. After that he lived for several years in Oklahoma, and while living in that state had the misfortune of suffering a stroke of apoplexy. From this he never entirely recovered; and...

Biography of Colonel Jacob H. Bartles

Time is the perspective which places the individual in his true position in relation to the history of the community with which he has been identified and time serves but to heighten the fame and brighten the good name of Colonel Jacob H. Bartles, in whose honor the town of Bartlesville was named and who was also the founder of Dewey. He was ever a man of most progressive spirit, of which many tangible evidences may be cited, including the fact that he was the first man to establish electric light and waterworks plants in the state. He was also in the vanguard of those who have promoted the educational and moral progress of the community, as well as its public utility. At the same time he wisely and carefully managed his business interests, so that success in substantial measure came to him, enabling him to provide a good living for those dependent upon him. His life record covered a period of sixty-eight years and won him the honor and respect of all those who appreciate fair-mindedness, loyalty, progressiveness and high standards of living. Mr. Bartles came to the southwest from the far-off state of New Jersey, his birth having occurred in Chester, Morris County, June 11, 1842, his parents being Joseph A. and Phoebe Helene Bartles. His father, a native of New York, put up the first telegraph wire in New York City and later he established his home on a farm in Morris County, New Jersey, which is now the property of the famous New York restaurateur, Childs. In 1857 Joseph A. Bartles sought the opportunities of...

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