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Biography of Crawford Wallace Womack

C. W. (Crawford Wallace) Womack, who lives retired at Lostine, Oregon, is one of the pioneer settlers of Wallowa valley. He was born in Shelby County, Illinois, on October 4, 1844, the son of William and Martha A. (Jordan) Womack, both of whom were natives of Tennessee. The parents were married in Illinois, where they had removed in youth with their parent’s. After their marriage they resided for a short time in Shelby County and then removed to Lee County, Iowa, and later to Putnam County, Missouri. In 1866 they came to Oregon, locating near Lostine, Oregon in Wallowa County, where they purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land. Later they moved into the town of Lostine, where they both passed away, the father, October 15, 1901, at the age of eighty-four years, and the mother February 9, 1901, at the age of eighty-three. They were both members of the Methodist Episcopal church. The father belonged to the Masonic lodge, having joined that order in the early ‘60s. C. W. Womack was reared under the parental roof and acquired his education in the common schools, attending an old time log schoolhouse, with its split logs for benches and its puncheon floor. In 1863, at the age of nineteen, he went with the gold seekers to Pike’s Peak, in Colorado, where he spent the summer, returning that winter to his home in Missouri. In the spring of 1864 he started across the plains for Oregon, making his way with ox teams in a wagon train of about eighty-three wagons. He was six months on the road, between the Missouri...

Biographical Sketch of James T. Davis

One of the worthy pioneers of this County, a man of ability and executive force and unswerving integrity, the subject of this sketch is now one of the leading citizens of Nyssa, and a prominent man in Malheur County. He lives one mile northwest from the town of Nyssa, having a ‘farm of one hundred and twenty acres, well improved and handled in a skillful manner, which is a good dividend producer. James T. was born in Unionville, Putnam County, Missouri, on October 25, 185o, being the son of Hamilton and Saline Davis. In 1862, the father and the oldest son came across the plains with ox teams and in 1865, our subject and his mother came the same journey with horse teams. They both made the trip without serious accident and when the mother arrived in Boise, the father was there to meet them and the reunited family made their way to the Willamette valley where they settled in Polk County. Four years later, they removed from that place to Umatilla County and in 1874, our subject went from the home in that County to Boise valley, Idaho, and later re-turned to his people, who had in the meantime migrated to Baker City. The reports which he brought from the Boise valley caused all to move there and engage in raising stock. Our subject went thence to Emmett, Idaho, and there married Miss Lulu Brinnon in May, 1881. In 1895, Mrs. Davis was called away by death. In 1885, Mr. Davis came from Idaho to Ontario and there engaged in the livery business, handling also and shipping many...

Biographical Sketch of James T. Hatfield

Three and one-half miles northeast from Owyhee is found the comfortable and valuable farm and home of the subject of this article. The estate is one of eighty acres of fine land, all covered by the Owyhee ditch and well cultivated and productive of abundant returns of hay, fruit and other valuable crops. Mr. Hatfield is one of the originators of the Owyhee ditch, and he labored faithfully on it from the time it was started until it was finished. Reverting to his personal history we note that James T. was born in Adair County, Missouri, on July 14, 1839, being the son of Andrew and Mary Hatfield. He removed with his parents while still a child to Putnam County, in the same state, and there remained with them until the time of his marriage, which happy event occurred on September 9, 1858. Miss Lucinda Sumpter then becoming his wife. In September, 1861 Mr. Hatfield enlisted in the Confederate Army under Price and participated in the battle of Lexington serving three months. Then he returned home and being convinced of the error of the cause of Confederacy, he did what few men would have the courage to do, that was own his mistake and offer his services on the right side. He enlisted in Company F. Ninth Missouri Volunteers and served in this capacity until the fall of 1863, being then honorably discharged. It was in the spring of 1863 that he joined a train of emigrants bound for the west with ox teams. Sixty-five wagons and on hundred and thirteen emigrants formed the train, and notwithstanding several attacks...

Biography of Joseph D. Daly

Among the officers of Ada County, Idaho, is Joseph DeWitt Daly, who is now acceptably filling the position of tax collector and assessor. He possesses that spirit of enterprise which has produced the rapid and wonderful development of the vast region west of the Mississippi, and in the discharge of his duties manifests a loyalty and faithfulness that has made his service most efficient, winning him the commendation of the best citizens of the community. A native of Missouri, he was born in Putnam County, on the 13th of January 1850, his parents being William and Permelia (Holland) Daly. His father was a native of Kentucky, born in 1801, and by occupation was a farmer. He continued his residence in Missouri until 1852, when he removed to Oregon, his death occurring at his home near Jacksonville, that state, in September, 1892. His wife, who was born in Tennessee, in 181 1, died in Missouri, in 1866. This worthy couple were the parents of twelve children, ten of whom are living. Six of the sons were soldiers in the Union army during the civil war, and two of them served throughout the entire conflict. Few families can show such a record for military valor or have so effectively labored for the welfare of the nation. Six brothers loyally following the old flag and defending the cause it represented, is a history of which any family might well be proud, and the name of Daly is deeply engraved on the military annals of the country. Joseph D. Daly acquired his education in the public schools of northern Missouri, and was reared...

Biography of Hon. Daniel A. McAlister

HON. DANIEL A. McALISTER. – Perhaps there is not another man living to-day in the Grande Ronde valley who is so popular with people and so great a favorite in Union and Wallowa counties as the subject of this sketch. And be it said to the credit of Mr. McAlister that in all his long public career he has nobly earned every encomium that has been given by an appreciative and discrimnating people. He is a man of large caliber, with vigor to sustain his untiring activity and integrity to maintain his position of uncompromising uprightness, while he is possessed of a practical judgment, keen foresight and executive ability that combined eminently fit him to fill the prominent place that he has enjoyed not only in the two counties mentioned, but in the estimation of the leading men throughout the state. Daniel A. was born in Coles county, Illinois, on February 6, 1842, and there received a good education from the common schools, attending the same in the winter and assisting on the farm in the summer. At the age of seventeen he spent his whole time on the farm and continued in the same until he was twenty, working with his stepfather. Then he went to Putnam county, Missouri, to visit an uncle and found him preparing to come to the Pacific coast. Our subject was enthused with the plans and heartily set to work assisting in the preparations, and in good time they joined the Yount train. Our subject rode on horseback the entire distance, driving loose stock. They were planning to go to the Willamette valley,...

Biography of Hon. John W. McAlister

HON. JOHN W. McALISTER. – It now becomes our pleasant privilege to outline in brief review the eventful career of the well known and highly esteemed gentlman whose name initiates this paragraph and whose life is connected with the county of Union, having been identified with it since his early boyhood and having been one of the potent factors in its development as also in making the laws which have proved so salutary for its progress and gaining, meanwhile, a reputation throughout the state because of the ability and sagacity displayed in the state halls of legislation, while no whit behind are the commendable moral virtues which his daily life exemplify, and the intrinsic worth of his character in constant display. Joyn W. was born in Putnam county, Missouri, on June 13, 1856, being the son of Harvye McAlister. When the son was six years of age, the father removed to the west with his family, having no particular objective point except Oregon. Having been safely guided through the long and dangerous journey until they came to Grande Ronde valley, and the teams being tired out, it was determined to stop and recruit, and the result was that Union county gained a prominent and substantial citizen. The father soon took up a squatter’s right on the land where our subject now resides, two miles east from Lagrande, and later homesteaded it. Two houses constituted the town of lagrande, when Mr. McAlister stopped his teams there first. Our subject grew up on the home place, receiving a good training from the schools of the county, and when he was twenty-three...

Womack, John William – Obituary

John William Womack, son of Jacob and Lurreene Bougher Womack, was born in Unionville, Missouri, He, and a cousin Crawford Womack, made an early trip into Wallowa Valley, camping along Bear Creek. During the night their horses wandered away from camp and were found the next morning at what is now the town site of Wallowa. They both returned again in 1877, when they both filed on homesteads. John filed southwest of the town of Wallowa, building a log cabin at the foot of the west slope of Green Hill. He named his homestead “Cove Ranch.” Crawford Womack and John McCubbin spent the first winter with John on his homestead. In 1881, a wagon train left Saint Joseph, Missouri, heading for Oregon, with Russell Thompson as wagon master. Russell and Catherine Hedges Thompson’s oldest daughter, Martha Jane, drove one of the teams and wagons across the plains. Traveling with the Thompson wagon train were Edna and Chella Pickett, also James (Tom) and his wife, Chata Pickett Willett. The train made a one-day layover about the location of Meridian, Idaho (about 10 miles west of Boise), where the Willetts son, Leslie (Leck), was born. The Willett family stopped at Union to spend the winter and the Thompson’s came on to the Wallowa Valley. John Womack married Martha Jane Thompson and they and their eight children lived in the little homestead until 1900 when their new house was built. This is now the home of Roland and Inez McCrae. John and Martha Jane Womack are buried in the Lostine Cemetery. Their children were: Pearl 1882-1954. Married John Richards and lived in...

Biography of F. A. Cassady

F. A. Cassady is one of the most successful business men of his age in the State of Kansas. He is proprietor of one of the largest general stores at Neosho Rapids and is also vice president of the Neosho Rapids State Bank. He had reached this position in business circles before attaining his twenty-second year. He was born in Graysville, Missouri, September 24, 1894. His grandfather was a native of County Londonderry, Ireland, and in the old country spelled his name William O’Cassady but dropped the first syllable when he came to the United States. He lived a time in New Jersey and from there brought his family to Missouri, where he spent his active career in Graysville. W. O. Cassady, father of the Neosho Rapids merchant, was born in Missouri in 1861, and for a number of years lived at Graysville and had been an active merchant for the past thirty-four years, his business interests having taken him to a number of different points. In 1900 he moved to Glencoe, Oklahoma, in 1903 to Severy, Kansas, in 1904 to Latham, Kansas, in 1905 to Exline, Iowa, in 1906 to Unionville, Missouri, in 1907 to Harvard, Iowa, in 1909 to Jasper, Missouri, in 1910 to Lindsborg, Kansas, and shortly afterwards to Hartford, Kansas, where he now resided. He had an interest in the store at Neosho Rapids and also owned a fine farm of 137 acres situated just southeast of Hartford. Politically he is identified with the prohibition party and is a member of the United Brethren Church. W. O. Cassady married Estella Geeslim, who was born in...

Biography of Arthur Winford Goodwin

Arthur Winford Goodwin. When the details of his career have been examined it will be seen that Arthur W. Goodwin had been the architect of a successful career in commercial fields. He started at the bottom, laboring as a boy in country stores to pay his own way in the world. He gained more than mere wages. All those early experiences he had turned to profit since he became a business man on his own account, and at the present time he is a member of the firm which conducts the largest department and general merchandise establishment at Howard, in Elk County. He is of an old American family. The Goodwins came from England and settled in New Hampshire in Colonial days. His grandfather, Daniel Goodwin, was a native of New Hampshire, where he was born in 1795. Little more than a boy, he served as a soldier in the War of 1812. He subsequently became an early settler in Louisville, New York, where he followed the trade of carpenter and the business of farmer until his death in 1883 at the venerable age of eighty-eight. The father of the Howard merchant was Rev. W. C. Goodwin, who became well known in Kansas as a pioneer minister of the Methodist Church, and whose career is sketched above. Rev. Mr. Goodwin married Miss Ellen Southworth, who was born in Louisville, New York, in 1837, and died at Moline, Kansas, in January, 1884. A record of their children is as follows: Carl E., who is connected with the Polar Mercantile Company at Emporia, Kansas; Frank S., a farmer at Granada, Colorado;...

Biography of George L. Atkeson

George L. Atkeson. To those parents who value the intellectual development of their children, it is a matter of vital importance that in the early and formative period of their lives, their instructors in the public schools should be thoroughly qualified for such responsibility in scholarly attainments and in personal character. In securing so widely known and so experienced an educator as George L. Atkeson as superintendent of their city schools, the good people of Altoona, Kansas, displayed exceptional wisdom. Intelligent public opinion here, as at other points, makes more insistent demands, asks for more decided results than in old days, a realization having come that the needs of future generations must not be imperiled by any narrowing of public school education in the present. A wider and deeper service is demanded than ever before, and to this field of effort a welcome is given the able, the understanding, the progressive educational leader, a worthy example of this class being found in George L. Atkeson. He is a native of Missouri, born near Tipton, in Morgan County, September 20, 1866. His parents were Francis M. and Mary A. (Frye) Atkeson. Francis M. Atkeson was born in 1830, near Charleston in Kanawha County, West Virginia, in which section the early ancestors of the family had settled after coming from England. His father, Andrew Atkeson, was also born in what is now West Virginia, and from there, probably in 1832, removed with his family to Morgan County, Missouri. He became a farmer there and operated the first blacksmith shop in Tipton. Practically Francis M. Atkeson spent his entire life near Tipton,...
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