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Slave Narrative of Henry Blake

Interviewer: Samuel S. Taylor Person Interviewed: Henry Blake Age: 80, or more Location: Rear of 1500 Scott Street, Little Rock, Arkansas Occupation: Farming and junk, when able [HW: Drove a “Horsepower Gin Wagon”] “I was born March 16, 1863, they tell me. I was born in Arkansas right down here on Tenth and Spring Streets in Little Rock. That was all woods then. We children had to go in at night. You could hear the wolves and the bears and things. We had to make a big fire at night to keep the wolves and varmints away. “My father was a skiffman. He used to cross the Arkansas River in a ferry-boat. My father’s name was Doc Blake. And my mother’s name was Hannah Williams before she morried. “My father’s mother’s name was Susie somethin’; I done forgot. That is too far back for me. My mother’s mother was named Susie—Susie Williams. “My father’s master was named Jim Paty. My father was a slavery man. I was too. I used to drive a horsepower gin wagon in slavery time. That was at Pastoria. Just this side of Pine Bluff—about three or four miles this side. Paty had two places-one about four miles from Pine Bluff and the other about four miles from England on the river. “When I was driving that horsepower gin wagon. I was about seven or eight years old. There wasn’t nothin’ hard about it. Just hitch the mules to one another’s tail and drive them ’round and ’round. There wasn’t no lines. Just hitch them to one another’s tail and tell them to git up....

Slave Narrative of Boston Blackwell

Interviewer: Beaulah Sherwood Hagg Person Interviewed: Boston Blackwell Age: 98 Location: 320 Plum, North Little Rock, Arkansas Make yourself comfoble, miss. I can’t see you much ’cause my eyes, they is dim. My voice, it kinder dim too. I knows my age, good. Old Miss, she told me when I got sold—”Boss, you is 13—borned Christmas. Be sure to tell your new misses and she put you down in her book.” My borned name was Pruitt ’cause I got borned on Robert Pruitt’s plantation in Georgia,—Franklin County, Georgia. But Blackwell, it my freed name. You see, miss, after my mammy got sold down to Augusta—I wish’t I could tell you the man what bought her, I ain’t never seed him since,—I was sold to go to Arkansas; Jefferson county, Arkansas. Then was when old Miss telled me I am 13. It was before the Civil War I come here. The onliest auction of slaves I ever seed was in Memphis, coming on to Arkansas. I heerd a girl bid off for $800. She was about fifteen, I reckon. I heerd a woman—a breeding woman, bid off for $1500. They always brought good money. I’m telling you, it was when we was coming from Atlanta. Do you want to hear how I runned away and joined the Yankees? You know Abraham Lincoln ‘claired freedom in ’63, first day of January. In October ’63, I runned away and went to Pine Bluff to get to the Yankees. I was on the Blackwell plantation south of Pine Bluff in ’63. They was building a new house; I wanted to feel some putty...

Biography of Caleb S. Stone, M. D.

Dr. Stone has left the ranks of the many to stand among the more successful few in a profession where advancement depends solely upon individual merit. In other walks of life, especially in commercial circles, one may enter upon a business already established and carry it on from the point where others laid it down, but the physician must rely solely upon his knowledge and ability, and these must be acquired through close and earnest application. That Dr. Stone, of Wallace, is numbered among the leading physicians and surgeons of his section of the state is therefore evidence of his power in his chosen calling. A native of Missouri, he was born May 10, 1859, his parents being Robert Harris and Eliza (Rodes) Stone, both of whom were natives of Kentucky, and are now deceased. The father died in Missouri, in 1881, at the age of sixty-five years, and the mother in Texas, when about thirty-five years of age. Mr. Stone engaged in merchandising throughout his business career. The Doctor obtained his preliminary education in the common schools of his native state, and supplemented it by study in an academy for boys at Little Rock, Arkansas, and in Woodlawn Seminary, at St. Charles, Missouri. He began the study of medicine in Louisville, Kentucky, at the age of seventeen years, and in 1879 he went to Leadville, Colorado, where he remained until 1881 acting as bookkeeper for the Chrysolite Mining Company. In 1882 he returned to Louisville, Kentucky, where he resumed the study of medicine, and in 1883 was graduated in the Louisville Medical College. Immediately afterward Dr. Stone began...

Biography of Walter J. Arnold

Walter J. Arnold. The county engineer of Shawnee County, Walter J. Arnold has led an active and diversified career, and although not yet forty-one years of age has crowded into his life more experiences than the ordinary man sees in an entire lifetime. From gold mining in Colorado to chasing the insurgents in the Philippines is a long call, but unlike many men whose activities have led them to out-of-the-way-places, Mr. Arnold has been constantly advancing, and each new experience, each new employment, has brought him a little bit further ahead toward the goal of success. In his present capacity, which he has filled for some five years, he is one of the most efficient and popular officials in the state. Mr. Arnold is a native of Saxony, born in the City of Dresden, in 1877, a son of Gustave and Ernestine (Zeuner) Arnold. In the old country the family belonged to the social democrats, and Friedrich Arnold, the grandfather of Mr. Arnold, was one of its pioneer leaders during the party’s early struggle for recognition of its principles of more liberal government. Gustave Arnold was also born in Saxony, where he was married, and there became agent for an immigration company, in which capacity he came to the United States with his family in 1882, bringing with him a colony of his fellow-countrymen for settlement. Locating first near Pine Bluff, Arkansas, he remained at that place for about three years, then moved to Kansas City, where he remained for another year, and finally, in 1886, came to Topeka, where he spent the remaining years of his active life....

Biographical Sketch of Louis Wolsey

Wolsey, Louis; rabbi; born, Jan. 8, 1877, Midland, Mich.; son of William and Frances Krueger Wolsey; educated, public and High Schools, Chicago, University of Cincinnati, B. A., 1899, Hebrew Union College, B. H. L., 1894; rabbi, 1899; post-graduate University of Chicago and Western Reserve University; married, June 12, 1912, Florence H. Wiener, daughter of Abraham Wiener, Cleveland; rabbi Congregation B’Ne Isreal, Little Rock, Ark., 1899-1907; rabbi Euclid Ave. Temple, Cleveland, 1907-; during incumbency new temple built at Euclid Ave. and East 82d; Chaplain-General Arkansas State Guard, 1905; member American Association of Political Science, Religious Education Ass’n, Central Conference of American Rabbis, B’Nai B’Rith, Zeta Beta Tau, Western Star Lodge, No. 2, F. & A. M., Little Rock, Shrine, honorary life member B. P. 0. E.; Excelsior Club; member of committee to nominate Charter Commission, Cleveland,...

Biography of James Cuthbert

James Cuthbert. One of the oldest and best known general contractors in the state is James Cuthbert of Topeka, which city has been his home and the center of his widely extended activities more than thirty-five years. As his name indicates, Mr. Cuthbert is a sturdy Scotchman, and his many associates and friends in Kansas say that he exemplifies all the best traits of the race. He was born in Nairnshire, Scotland, July 14, 1849, a son of James and Jane (Bowie) Cuthbert, who spent their lives in Scotland. He grew up among his native hills and heather, had a public school education, and after reaching his majority attended evening schools in Glasgow. At Elgin, Scotland, he served a four years’ apprenticeship at stone cutting, and subsequently worked as a journeyman in Glasgow. In order that he might find those abundant opportunities which he had long heard existed in America, he carefully saved his money to enable him to cross the Atlantic and make a home in the New World. Through the influence of Mr. Coats, whose name is familiar throughout the world as the inventor of the Coats thread, he went to Canada in March, 1872, and for a time worked at Peterboro, Ontario. After six months in Canda he came to the United States, and for about a year followed his trade in Cincinnati. It was in Cincinnati that he made the acquaintance of the late John Sargent, who for many years was his associate in the contracting business at Topeka. From Cincinnati Mr. Cuthbert went to Indianapolis, and after working at his trade took up contracting....

Biographical Sketch of Roscoe Simmons Cate

Roscoe Simmons Cate, an attorney of Muskogee, was born in Bradley county, Tennessee, on the 2d of September, 1876, his parents being William Lea and Joanna E. (Julian) Cate, the former an educator. Roscoe Simmons Cate obtained his education in the public schools of St. Louis, Missouri, and of Little Rock, Arkansas, while his professional training was received in the Benton College of Law of St. Louis, from which he was graduated in June, 1901. He first located for practice at McAlester, Oklahoma, and there followed his profession until 1908, when he became chief clerk to the superintendent of the Five Civilized Tribes, thus serving until 1915. In the latter year he again turned his attention to law practice and has since built up a good clientage in Oklahoma, specializing in Indian affairs. He belongs to both the Muskogee Bar Association and the Oklahoma State Bar Association. On the 9th of March, 1905, Mr. Cate was united in marriage to Miss Martha Annette Griffin of McAlester, Oklahoma, and they have become parents of two children: Roscoe Simmons, Jr., and Alice Elizabeth. Mr. Cate is a deacon in the Presbyterian church and in Masonry has attained the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite, also belonging to the Mystic...

Biography of Raymond F. Dutch

Raymond F. Dutch. Since September, 1903, the Chanute Business College had occupied a recognized position of importance among the institutions of commercial education in Southeastern Kansas, and each year had seen its scope broadening and its usefulness increasing. It is accomplishing good work in the training of young men and women to take their place in the business world, and many of its former pupils have already attained places of prominence in business circles. The present manager and proprietor of this institution is Raymond F. Dutch, who had had broad and varied experience both as an educator and in business life, and since becoming the head of the college he had added a number of departments designed to cover a broader field and to more thoroughly equip the students for competition in business and industrial circles. Mr. Dutch is a native son of Kansas and a product of the farm, having been born on his father’s farm in Wilson County, January 13, 1886, a son of A. F. and Sekunda (Ellison) Dutch. His grandfather, Peter Dutch, was born in Germany, in 1827, and was a young man when he came to the United States to better his fortunes, first settling near Kalamazoo, Michigan, and in 1879 locating in Kansas. He was a shoemaker by trade and followed that vocation for many years, but finally invested his capital in a Wilson County farm, on which he carried on operations during his latter years, and where he died in 1898. During the Civil war he enlisted in an Indian volunteer infantry regiment, with which he served during the greater part of...

Biography of Archie Earle Carder, M. D.

Dr. Archie Earle Carder, a successful physician and surgeon of Coweta, with offices in the First State Bank building, has been a representative of the medical profession here for the past two decades and is the oldest practitioner of Wagoner County. He was born at Marshall, Texas, on the 29th of May, 1864, a son of George W. and Ellen M. (McDaniel) Carder, who were natives of Beverly, Virginia, and of North Carolina respectively. The father made his way to Arkadelphia, Arkansas, in 1849 and became a merchant there. At the outbreak of the Civil war he enlisted for service in the Confederate army and was in the commissary department most of the time but served as a courier on the staff of General Fagen for a short period. When the war was over he returned to Arkadelphia, where he continued to reside throughout the remainder of his life, his death occurring in March, 1904, when he had reached the age of seventy-four years. For sixteen consecutive years he served as mayor of Arkadelphia, giving to the city a most progressive and businesslike administration that resulted in many needed reforms and improvements. For about six years he survived his wife, who departed this life in April, 1898, at the age of fifty-six. Though a native of Texas, Archie E. Carder was reared and educated in Arkadelphia, Arkansas, for his mother was a resident of the Lone Star state only during the period of the father’s service in the army. His early training in the public schools was supplemented by a course of study in the Baptist high school and...

Gorham, Sarah A. – Obituary

Mrs. Gorham’s Death Recalls Mate’s Murder Mother of Wolfe Creek Farmer Passes While Visiting Relatives in Texas – Lived in Mexico Mrs. Sarah A. Gorham, mother of Jack Gorham of North Powder and Mrs. Enolia Brothers of Cove, died at the home of her neice, (sic) Vesta Green, at Slidell, Tex., July 26, last. The funeral took place in that city July 27, at the Methodist church, of which she was a member nearly all her life. Mrs. Gorham and her family for many years made their home in old Mexico and her death recalls the murder of her husband, Franklin P. Gorham, by five Mexicans at Chamal, state of Tamaulipas, April 28, 1919. In 1903 the Gorhams were members of a colony of 35 families who moved to that section of Mexico and most of whom remained there until 1917 when President Wilson intervened and Americans were requested to return to the states, this government paying their transportation to any point in this country in which they wished to come. Mr. and Mrs. Gorham with their daughter and her husband, D.B. Brothers, and three younger sons came to North Powder, to which place two sons, Edgar and Jack had preceded them several years. Remaining here a part of two years, the elder Gorham returned to Chamal, where he and other members of the original colony still retained land and property. It was shortly after his return that he was waylaid and wantonly murdered, presumedly (sic) for the trifling amount of about $10 on his person. Members of the highwaymen who killed him are said to have confessed but,...
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