Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

Biography of C. K. Merriam, M.D.

C.K. MERRIAM, M.D. – Mr. Merriam was born June 29, 1848, in Houlton, Aroostook County, Maine, being the eighth child in a family of ten children, the third and fourth being girls. His father, Lewis Merriam, when a young man, went from New Salem, Massachusetts, to Maine, in 1832, and married and settled in Houlton in 1833. He is now eighty-two years old, and is coming West this summer. The parents were poor, and lived on a farm two miles from the village. In early childhood he was taught to pick wool, quill yarn, etc., as the wool of the farm was manufactured into garments in the family mill, the motive power of which was supplied principally by his mother; and with boyish impatience he watched his father make his first pair of shoes by candle light. If a book, slate, or pocket money for a Fourth of July celebration were needed, the wild strawberry patch frequently contributed the means. If a handsled, cart or miniature mill were desired, it was found in the workshop over the woodshed after a few days’ work with the lumber and tools; while the yearly sugar camp in the maple grove furnished amusement for the boys as well as syrup for the family. The farm was sold; and the family moved about two miles to a sawmill which the father built on the north branch of the Meduxnekeag, where they remained a short time, until the mill was sold to the oldest son in 1861. The family move again to a farm having an old up-and-down sawmill in Hayesville, Maine, about twenty-five miles...

Biography of Edward Huggins

EDWARD HUGGINS, – Edward Huggins was born in London, England, on the 10th of June, 1832. He received his education in Queen Elizabeth’s Grammar School in that city. On the 10th of October, 1849, he sailed in the Hudson’s Bay Company’s ship Norman Morrison for Victoria, Vancouver Island, where he arrived in March, 1850. He at once entered the employ of the Hudson’s Bay Company, having been engaged as clerk by Chief Factor James Douglas, afterwards Sir James Douglas, the governor of Vancouver Island. He was sent to Fort Nisqually on Puget Sound to serve as trader and clerk under Doctor W.F. Tolmie, who was at that time the agent in charge of the business of the Hudson’s Bay and Puget Sound Agricultural Companies at that place. At that time the business of the Puget Sound agricultural Company, and that of the Hudson’s Bay Company, were entirely distinct. The Hudson’s Bay Company devoted their whole attention to the trading in furs and the sale of goods, for which at that time there was a great demand and high prices obtained, consequent upon the scarcity of goods of any kind, and the utter impossibility almost of purchasers having a choice of opportunities for trading. In fact, up to 1851-52, the Hudson’s Bay Company’s store at Nisqually was the only trading establishment between Forts Victoria and Vancouver on the Columbia river, except perhaps a very small American establishment at Olympia, then a small cleared space in the woods, with a very small general store kept by Colonel Michael T. Simmons. The company kept a large supply of goods on hand, worth...

Biography of Joseph Schoewaiter Smith

Joseph Schoewaiter Smith, was born in Fayette County, Pennsylvania, June 20, 1824. His ancestors at an early day emigrated from England and Wales and settled in New Jersey and their descendants are now scattered all over the United States. At the age of eight years he accompanied his parents to Clermont County, Ohio, and three years later to Vermilion County, Indiana. He received such education as a farmer’s boy of ambition could receive at that day in a pioneer neighborhood. During the summer he worked on the farm and in the winter attended such schools as the county afforded. He early evinced great fondness for books which stimulated his thirst for knowledge, and at the age of sixteen he left his home determined by his own exertions to obtain a better education than the limited means of his father would permit. From that time until he was nearly twenty he spent at school all the time which the hardest physical labor necessary to support himself would allow. In the fall of 1844 he started for Oregon. Several months were consumed in making the overland journey, the winter of 1844-5 being passed among the Indians in the Rocky Mountains, while every mile of the long journey to the settlement in the Willamette Valley was beset by perils and privations such as fell to the lot of the pioneer land emigrants to this portion of the northwest coast. In the spring of 1845 he reached Oregon City with only two companions, and soon after his arrival began the study of the law, supporting himself until his admission to the bar by...

Pin It on Pinterest