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Expeditions of Fowler and James to Santa Fe, 1821

When Pike returned from his western expedition and related his experiences in Santa Fe and other places among the Spaniards, his accounts excited great interest in the east, which resulted in further exploits. In 1812, an expedition was undertaken1 by Robert McKnight, James Baird, Samuel Chambers, Peter Baum, Benjamin Shrive, Alfred Allen, Michael McDonald, William Mines, and Thomas Cook, all citizens of Missouri Territory; they were arrested by the Spaniards, charged with being in Spanish territory without a passport, and thrown into the calabazos of Chihuahua, where they were kept for nine years. In 1821, two of them escaped, and coming down Canadian and Arkansas rivers met Hugh Glenn, owner of a trading house at the mouth of the Verdigris, and told him of the wonders of Santa Fe. Inspired by the accounts of these travelers, Glenn engaged in an enterprise with Major Jacob Fowler and Captain Pryor for an expedition from the Verdigris to Santa Fe.2 The members of the McKnight party who had escaped from the Spaniards, continued their journey to Saint Louis, where they repeated their romantic tale to John McKnight, a brother of Robert McKnight who was still a prisoner with the Spaniards, and to others. As a result of their account, McKnight and General Thomas James organized an expedition to go from Saint Louis to Santa Fe. James’s purpose was to trade with the Indians, and John McKnight went to see his brother and procure his release, if possible. The two expeditions got under way the same summer, and both went by way of the Arkansas as high as the Verdigris, which at that...

Kit Carson, His Life and Adventures – Indian Wars

The subject of this sketch, Christopher “Kit” Carson, was born on the 24th of December, 1809, in Madison County, Kentucky. The following year his parents removed to Howard County, Missouri, then a vast prairie tract and still further away from the old settlements. The new home was in the midst of a region filled with game, and inhabited by several predatory and hostile tribes of Indians, who regarded the whites as only to be respected for the value of their scalps. The elder Carson at once endeavored to provide for the safety of his family, as far as possible, by the erection of that style of fortress then so common on the frontier, a log block house. In this isolated spot, surrounded by dangers of every sort, the little Christopher imbibed that love of adventure and apparent disregard of personal peril, which made him so famous in after years. When he was only twelve years old, being out one day assisting in the search of game, his father sent him to a little knoll, a short distance off, to see if a certain curious looking, overhanging cliff there might not possibly shelter a spring of water. Instead of the spring, however, he found a shallow cave, and in it, sleeping quietly on their bed of moss and leaves, lay two young cubs. With boyish exultation he caught them in his arms and hastened as fast as possible toward his father. In spite of their squirming he had borne them half way down the hill, when the sound of a heavy footfall and a fierce panting of breath warned him...

Ash Hollow and Cheyenne Expedition

In 1856, eight years after our last look at the eastern edge of the Mountain country, there had not been much alteration in its appearance in the matter of settlements. There still remained the two pueblos on the Arkansas, one at the mouth of the Fontaine Que Bouille, the present city of Pueblo, Colorado, and the other some thirty miles farther up the stream, called Hardscrabble. The former was established in 1840, and the latter two or three years later. Their character may be gathered from the following extract from a letter of Indian agent Fitzpatrick, in 1847: “About seventy-five miles above this place (Fort Bent), and immediately on the Arkansas River, there is a small settlement, the principal part of which is composed of old trappers and hunters; the male part of it are mostly Americans, Missouri French, Canadians, and Mexicans. They have a tolerable supply of cattle, horses, mules, etc., and I am informed that this year they have raised a good crop of wheat, corn, beans, pumpkins, and other vegetables. They number about one hundred and fifty souls, and of this number there are about sixty men, nearly all having wives, and some have two. These wives are of various Indian tribes, as follows, viz., Blackfoot, Assinaboines, Arickeras, Sioux, Arapahoes, Cheyennes, Snake, Sinpitch (from west of the Great Lake), Chinnook (from the mouth of the Columbia), Mexicans and Americans. The American women are Mormons: a party of Mormons having wintered there, and, on their departure for California, left behind two families. These people are living in two separate establishments near each other; one called “Punble” (Pueblo?)...

Biographical Sketch of William Franklin Minton

It is with pleasure that we essay the task of epitomizing the salient points in the interesting career of the estimable and enterprising gentleman whose name is at the head of this article, and it is very fitting that such be granted space in the history of Malheur County, since he has labored here for the up building of the county and has wrought with wisdom and energy for this end, while also he has spent much time on the frontier and in other places, always, however, manifesting that same energy and capability in furthering the chariot of progress and building for the generations to come. Mr. Minton was born in Cape Girardeau County, Missouri, on November25, 1856, being the son of Willis J. and Martha S. (Coker) Minton. When he was a lad of seven he was taken by his parents to Cedar County, and in 1874 went with his parents to Pueblo, Colorado, and thence he went to Florence, Colorado, and there followed farming for a time. There also he was married on August 14, 1880, Miss Minerva Jackson becoming his wife on that occasion. In 1884 he removed with his family to New Mexico, securing a farm, which he tilled until 1889. In the last year mentioned he came via the Southern Pacific to San Francisco and thence on the steamer “State of California” to Portland. Soon we find him in Walla Walla and then in Spokane, Washington, later in Butte, Montana, whence he went to Tacoma, remaining there until 1891, occupied as foreman for the Tacoma Contracting Company. After this he was in Spokane again...

Biographical Sketch of Robert H. Dawson

Dawson, Robert H.; lawyer; born, Pontiac, Mich., March 28, 1882; son of John W. and Jean Hamilton Dawson; educated, University of Michigan, A. B., 1903, and Western Reserve University, 1909, LL. B.; married, Pueblo, Colo., Sept. 14, 1910, Miss Luna Cooper; member Phi Delta Phi Fraternity. Recreations: Baseball and...

Biography of George W. Robinson

George W. Robinson of Wichita has been a Kansan forty years. His first work in this state was as an educator at Winfield, continuing from June, 1876, to June, 1879. He soon turned to the more congenial work of a business career. The field in which his energies have found their most successful issues has been in banking, and there are a number of flourishing institutions in the state which were organized or at some time in their career have received the benefit of his excellent judgment and financial ability. Born February 20, 1855, in Piqua, Ohio, he went to Illinois when a boy and was a student in Hedding College at Abingdon, in that state, until 1873. While in Illinois he taught in the country schools of MacDonough, Fulton and Adams counties, and during the school years of 1874-75-76 was principal of schools at LaPrairie, Illinois. He next accepted the superintendency of the schools of Winfield, Kansas, and held that position from June, 1876, to June, 1879. In June of the latter year he became associated with his uncle, M. L. Read, and brothers, M. L. and W. C. Robinson, in the M. L. Reads Bank at Winfield. Since then his business record has been almost exclusively in the field of banking. In July, 1884, the M. L. Reads Bank was merged into the First National Bank of Winfield, with M. L. Read, president; M. L. Robinson, vice president; W. C. Robinson, cashier; and George W. Robinson as assistant cashier. Later he was promoted to vice president and cashier. During the years 1901-02 he was cashier and president...

Biography of Malcolm Campbell Newman, M. D.

Malcolm Campbell Newman, M. D., whose work as a physician and surgeon had brought him high standing among the citizens of Toronto and over a large part of the county, moved to Toronto in 1913 from Virgil, where he had practiced for several years. Doctor Newman looks after a large general medical and surgical practice, having his offices on the main street of town, and since locating at Toronto had served as health officer. He is a member of the Woodson County and State Medical societies and the American Medical Association. Doctor Newman was born in Gentry County, Missouri, August 20, 1881. The Newmans combine both Scotch and English stock and were early settlers in the State of Ohio. Doctor Newman’s mother’s people were pioneers in Indiana. Isaac B. Newman, his father, was born in Pike County, Ohio, in 1841. In 1865 his parents removed to Gentry County, Missouri, and he came with them and married there. For a number of years he was a merchant and hotel proprietor at Darlington, Missouri. In 1886 he came to Greeley County, Kansas, and was identified with stock raising there until he retired to California in 1911. He died at Huntington Park, California, in 1913. He made a creditable record as a soldier during the Civil war. He went out with the Seventy-sixth Ohio Infantry in 1862, and was in the army three years until 1865. He followed the regiment in all its campaigns, and two of the conspicuous battles in which he took part were Chickamauga and Lookout Mountain. It is not known that his soldier experience made him a republican,...

Hayes, Katherine Etta “Katie” Harris Mrs. – Obituary

Katherine Etta “Katie” Hayes, 81, died Aug. 9, 2005, at St Elizabeth Health Services after a knee replacement operation. Her graveside memorial service will be at 11 a.m. Monday at Mount Hope Cemetery. Katie was born at Salina, Kan., on Aug. 21, 1923, to Nathaniel Creager Harris, a not-so-tall Texan, and Mary Margaret Shank. The Shank family had lived in Kansas for many years as homestead-era farmers. Salina was her home through 1941. After graduating from Salina High School, she set off like many of her generation to work in support of the war effort as a Western Union operator in Pueblo, Colo. It was in Pueblo that Katie met her future husband, Walter Hartwell Hayes. Walt, a longtime Baker City resident, was posted at Pueblo with the U.S. Army in the Signal Corps. Walt and Katie were engaged in late 1942 and, after Walt’s transfer from Pueblo, were married at Walla Walla, Wash., on Aug. 7, 1943. Walt and Katie were subsequently transferred to Lincoln, Neb., where their first child, Walter Creager “Creag” Hayes, was born on Katie’s 21st birthday, Aug. 21, 1944. In mid-1945, Katie and her little baby took the train to Baker City to be with her husband’s parents while awaiting Walt’s discharge in November 1945. Except for a brief one-year period when they lived at Portland, Katie and Walt spent the rest of their lives in Baker City. Walt, although not in good health, is now in St Elizabeth Health Care Center. Katie and Walt had two more children, Jeanne Anne, born April 1, 1948, and Julie Alice, born April 17, 1952. Katie was...

Hayes, Walter Hartwell – Obituary

Baker City, Baker County, Oregon Walter Hartwell Hayes, 85, of Baker City, died April 1, 2006, at St. Elizabeth Care Center, where he had lived the past 9 years. There will be a memorial service this summer at Mount Hope Cemetery when family members can return from Europe and the Middle East. Walt was born at Baker City on April 22, 1920, to Walter Dutton Hayes and Junia Philbrick Hayes. He spent almost his entire life in Baker County. The “lay-in home” where he was born is still standing on Spring Garden Avenue, not but a block from where his oldest grandson and family live. The family lived up Sutton Creek on the “Hayes Creek Farm” as his dad called it, and Walt attended the Brookside School, as well as the Beaver Creek School before coming into town to attend the Helen M. Stack Middle School and Baker Senior High. He and his two sisters would ride their horses to school in good weather and in winter would strap on their skis and head out in the deep snow in order to get to school. It was uphill both ways and a bit of a distance. Being the only son, he spent much of his time working around the farm and growing up quickly, helping his dad with the horses and working in the wheat/barley/oats fields. The hours were from sunup until sunset and many times proved way too much for a young lad of 8 to 10 years of age. His childhood was not spent at having a lot fun and he grew up before his time. Many...

Honeycutt, Gwendolyn Akin Mrs. – Obituary

Gwendolyn Akin Honeycutt, 100, a longtime Halfway resident, died Nov. 1, 2000, at her home. Her graveside funeral was Tuesday at the Pine Haven Cemetery at Halfway. Buck Steele officiated. Mrs. Honeycutt was born Oct. 18, 1900, at Victor, Colo., to George and Lucy Akin. She married Washington Denver Honeycutt on Nov. 5, 1919, at Pueblo, Colo. They had four daughters over the next eight years while traveling the West picking fruit. In the early 1930s, they owned a car dealership, but lost almost everything during the Depression. In 1939 they moved to Halfway where they farmed and later established a mining claim where they lived until Mr. Honeycutt’s death in 1982. Mrs. Honeycutt remained in Halfway for the next 11 years, caring for herself and her two beloved cats. She became ill in April 1993 and moved to Baker City with her grandchildren, Darl and Lynda Pifher. She loved her cats, her family, friends and Western novels, which she listened to on her tape player. Survivors include her daughters, Shirley Coyle and Lois Bowerman, both of Halfway; 10 grandchildren and numerous great-grandchildren, nieces and nephews; and her dearest friends, Connie Carnagy and Rose Steele. She was preceded in death by her parents, four brothers, her husband and two daughters, Thelma and Bessie Kempe. Used with permission from: The Baker City Herald, Baker City, Oregon, November 10, 2000 Transcribed by: Belva...
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