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Biography of George Paul Burleigh

George Paul Burleigh is an attorney at law of St. Louis who is engaged in the general practice of law, specializing in trademark practice, to which he has given his attention for twenty-two years. He has the distinction of having served as the youngest member of the Missouri legislature in 1899 and has long been active in all those interests which have to do with the welfare and progress of city and state. He was born in Providence, Rhode Island, June 29, 1873, his parents being James E. and Mary (Johnson) Burleigh. The father was a native of Paisley, Scotland, and on coming to the United States in 1855 settled in Providence, Rhode Island, where he was married to Miss Mary Johnson, a native of Ireland. They became the parents of six sons and six daughters, of whom three sons and four daughters are living: William J., a physician; Frank J., who is engaged in the insurance business; George P., of this review: Mrs. Marv B. Peacock. a widow: Mrs. J. J. De Martini: Mrs. Joseph M. Fahey; and Mrs. Lillian T. Mosher, also a widow. The father came to St. Louis from Providence, Rhode Island, with his family in 1874 and here engaged in the cigar manufacturing business in which he remained with good success until his death in 1916. His wife has also passed away. George P. Burleigh attended the public schools and afterward the St. Louis University in the pursuit of his education. He completed his literary course in the latter institution in 1894 and then took up the study of law, which he pursued in...

Biographical Sketch of Aldrich, James Mott

Aldrich, James Mott, son of Arnold and Dollee Lang Aldrich, was born in Smithfield, Providence County, R. I., October 30, 1817. He attended the common schools and the academy at Union Village. He studied medicine in the office of Dr. J. A. Brown, Providence, R. I., Harvard medical school, and in the Botanic Medical College, Cincinnati, Ohio; and commenced regular practice in Fall River in 1843, in which city he has ever since lived. Dr. Aldrich was married in Dedham, May 24, 1844, to Mary A. Allen, who died in 1857. He was again married, September 23, 1862, to Louisa G., the daughter of Hon. Nathaniel B. and Sarah (Gray) Borden, of Fall River. They have two children; Mary L. and Nathaniel B. Aldrich. From 1846 to ’47 he was editor of the “Medical Enquirer.” He has been for many years president of the Children’s Home; was a member of the school board fifteen years; and is president of the Barnard Manufacturing Company. Dr. Aldrich was a strong abolitionist, and has been a life-long advocate of total abstinence from all intoxicants; was a member of the Society of Friends, but left them when their New England yearly meeting forbade the opening of their meeting-houses for anti-slavery gatherings. He has been connected with the Unitarian society since...

Biographical Sketch of Ames, Oliver

Ames, Oliver, son of Oakes and Eveline (Gilmore) Ames, was born in Easton, Bristol County, February 4, 1831. He passed the usual public school course of his native town, and prepared for college in the academies at No. Attleborough and Leicester. His college course—a special one – was taken at Brown University, Providence, R. I. He began business life as an employee in the shovel works of Oliver Ames & Sons. He afterwards went on the road as traveling agent for the firm, of which he soon became an active partner. While engaged in the never-ceasing round of cares that are incident to the carrying on of immense manufacturing establishments, Olive Ames has always found time in which to serve his fellow-citizens in public matters, whether state, county, municipal or social. He has been twelve years a member of the Easton school board; two years in the state Senate (1880 and ’81); four years lieutenant-governor (1883 to ’86), and governor of the Commonwealth three years, 1887, ’88, and ’89. Governor Ames has served in the Massachusetts volunteer militia as 2d lieutenant, adjutant, major and lieutenant colonel. He has been for many years president and director of various railroad, manufacturing and mining corporations and banking institutions. He is actively connected with a number of benevolent societies and has a membership in many social and political clubs. Governor Ames was married in Nantucket, March 14, 1860, to Anna Coffin, daughter of Obed and Anna W. Ray, and adopted daughter of William Hadwen of Nantucket. Of this union are six children; William Hadwen, Evelyn, Anna Lee, Susan Evelyn, Lilian and Oakes Ames....

Biography of Clement Richardson

Clement Richardson, of Jefferson City, president of the Lincoln Institute, deserves mention as an eminent educator, for his professional work has been not merely instilling knowledge into the minds of pupils but has been broad in its scope, thoughtful in its purposes and human in its tendency. lie has studied the individual and his requirement, has met the needs of the school and has made valuable contributions to literature that has to do with his profession. Mr. Richardson was born June 23. 1878, in Halifax county, Virginia, a son of Leonard and Louise (Barksdale) Richardson. In his youthful days he attended the White Oak Grove country school, but his opportunity to pursue his studies was limited to a brief period each year, as it was necessary that he work in the tobacco fields. He was still quite a young lad when obliged to leave school in Virginia, and later he became mail carrier for the Brow Hill plantation near Paces station. In 1895, however, prompted thereto by a laudable ambition, he made his way to Massachusetts seeking work and with a view to promoting his education. After spending some years in Winchester, Massachusetts, working in a tannery, a glue factory and on a farm, through the help of the Young Men’s Christian Association and the First Baptist church of Winchester, he was able to enter the Dwight L. Moody Mount Herman school for boys. It was in the fall of 1897 that he entered Mount Herman, there pursuing a classical course, working all the time to pay his way, doing cooking and farm work and thus meeting his expenses....

Biography of Abraham Graham

Abraham Graham. The quiet life and substantial accomplishments of the farmer have been the lot of Abraham Graham, who is now living in the town of Penfield, retired from the strenuous labors which marked his early youth. Mr. Graham has been identified with Champaign County almost half a century, and his life record is one that will be read with pleasure by his many friends and acquaintances as well as by his family. He long ago accumulated sufficient to protect him against the days that are to come, and the respect in which he is held is no less than his material accomplishment. Mr. Graham is a native of the Emerald Isle, born in County Monaghan, December 27, 1838, a son of Hugh and Sarah (McMahon) Graham. He was the third of nine children, six sons and three daughters. He acquired an education in his native country and at the age of nineteen determined to take advantage of the wonderful opportunities of America. Accompanied by a cousin, Miss Rosa Martin, he sailed on the ship Aurora and five weeks and three days later arrived at Castle Garden, New York. From there he went to Providence, Rhode Island, and for nine months during the panic of 1857 worked in lumber yards. He then became a farmer at Glencove in Queen’s County on Long Island, but three years later came west to Illinois, stopping first at Buffalo. Later he joined a cousin at Illiopolis and worked on a farm there for several years. On February 26, 1867, Mr. Graham married Miss Anna E. Welsh. She was born in Franklin County, Pennsylvania,...

Biography of Levi Livermore Tucker

Levi Livermore Tucker, late superintendent and president of the Kansas Wesleyan Business College of Salina, devoted practically his entire life to the training of young men and women for business. Fully forty years were given to that profession, and few men accomplished a more satisfying aggregate of results in this field than Professor Tucker. He was of New England birth and ancestry. The farm in Orange County, Vermont, where he was born December 10, 1853, was also the birthplace of his father, Levi Livermore Tucker, Sr., and the house that thus served as a birthplace to these two generations was also the birthplace of Professor Tucker’s oldest living child. Mr. Tucker’s mother was Betty Putnam Carleton, also a native of Vermont. His early education Mr. Tucker acquired in the Vermont Conference Seminary at Newbury, where he was graduated with the class of 1874 at the age of twenty-one. He afterwards took a two years’ course in the Troy Rosiness College of Troy, New York, and for one year taught in the Troy Conference Business College at Courtney, Vermont. Following that came three years spent as principal of the Schofield Business College of Providence, Rhode Island. For fourteen years Mr. Tucker was principal of the New Jersey Business College at Newark, then for one year had charge of the office of a leather factory at Newark, and for ten years was professor of the commercial branches in Mount Union College of Alliance, Ohio. After two years at Tharp University in Louisville, Kentucky, Mr. Tucker was called in 1913 to become president of the Kansas Wesleyan Business College at Salina. Here...

Biography of Richmond T. Battey

Richmond T. Battey is a retired banker at Florence, Kansas, with which community he had been, identified as a businees man and leader in public affairs for forty years. Mr. Battey is one of the old timers of Kansas. His recollections of the state go back to the territorial period of the latter ’50s. His experiences as a whole and particularly those of his earlier years are mainly a reflection of those events and times which form the substance of Kansas history. He knew the western plains and the old trails by actual experience, and is perhaps as well informed on that phase of the great western history as any man now living. Mr. Battey was born at Providance, Rhode Island, September 16, 1849, and came to Kansas with his parents, Stephen and Rebecca (Cady) Battey. His father was an early day Kansan, concerning whom some record should be made in permanent form. He was a native of Rhode Island and died at Florence, Kansas. In early life he was a confectioner and baker, but subsequently entered the ministry of the Baptist Church and gave several years to that work. In 1858 he came to Kansas, and during the first year he leased land now occupied by the campus of Washburn. College at Topeka. After farming this land a year he went into the freighting and transportation business over the western plains. That was his main business for many years until the building of railroads cansed the ox and mule trains to depart forever. He drove many wagon trains, drawn by mule teams, across the plains to Colorado and...

Biography of Frank Sigel Dietrich

The day of the lawyer who depended upon inspiration, and whose chief preparation for forensic victory was the acquisition of alcoholic stimulants, is past. The lawyer of today depends not alone upon inspiration, but also upon hard work in preparing his cases for trial, and upon their careful presentation and handling in the courts. Usually he has to convince hard-headed business men of the merits of his case, which involves nothing of sentiment or of sensationalism and much of pecuniary interest and of commercial right and wrong, pure and simple. He goes before a judge and jury cool, collected, alert, bristling with business, equipped with a thorough knowledge of principles and decisions applicable to his case, ready for emergencies, and with the persuasive oratory of reason and precedent clearly expressed and logically arrayed, but having little need for mere theatrical display. Thus equipped, thus discharging his duty to his client, to the court, and to himself, he wins upon the law and the evidence, ably interpreting the one and bringing out the full force of the other. Such a modern, successful lawyer is the subject of this sketch, concerning whose life we have gathered the following facts. Frank Sigel Dietrich was born near Ottawa, Kansas, January 23, 1863, and came of German ancestry. Both his father and his mother were born near Frankfort, in Germany, where they spent the early portion of their lives, but, imbued with that strong desire for personal liberty and personal rights characterizing so many Germans, they emigrated to America in 1855. For two years they lived in the city of Chicago, but still desiring...

Biography of Peter Donnelly

Among the prominent pioneer miners of Silver City we should mention this highly esteemed citizen of Dewey, Owyhee County. He is a native of Ireland, born in county Longford, October 31, 1833. In 1840 his parents emigrated to the New World, settling in Rhode Island, and young Peter was brought up in the city of Providence. He arrived in California in the spring of 1853 and for several years followed placer mining, in all the prominent diggings of that state. Upon the discovery of gold at Oro Fino he was among the first to arrive there, in April 1862, and engaged in furnishing the miners with meat. He arrived in Idaho basin in March, 1863, and in June following came to the vicinity of Silver City, as a member of the company headed by Captain Michael Jordan. The packers then at the gulch were Cyrus Iby, Dr. Rood (one of the original discoverers). Jack Reynolds and a Mr. Boon. A man named Thompson whipsawed the lumber and made and set the first flumes. Mr. Donnelly and his partner, Michael Jordan, set an Indian-head on the top of a pole at the camp, which became the occasion of the place being called “Skull Camp.” Another partner was a man named Charles Skinner. They together opened the wagon road to Snake River, having first obtained from the territorial legislature a charter, which had a life of fifteen years. The toll on this road was three dollars for a pair of horses and wagon, one dollar for a horse and carriage, and twenty-five cents for a saddle horse. At the same time...

Biographical Sketch of Newton S. Calhoun

Calhoun, Newton S.; pres. and treas. The Johnson Jennings Co.; born in Connecticut, Feb. 12, 1855; son of William E. and Almira Tracy Calhoun; educated, Suffield Academy, in Connecticut, and Brown University, Providence, R. I., graduating in 1879, degree of A. M.; married, Cleveland, 1884, Miss Caroline Jennings; issue, one son, Tracy Jennings, born in 1885, and one daughter, Carol, now Mrs. Lyman Narten; business career, taught school two years in the Providence high school; studied law while teaching and summers; one year in office of Judge Tillinghast in. Providence; came to Cleveland in the fall of 1882; in 1883, began law practice with the late A. C. Caskey; in 1896, became treas. of the Johnson-Jennings Co., and in 1905, was made pres.; also vice pres. and treas. the Royal Tourist Car Co.; member Chamber of Commerce and Athletic Club; Republican; member Pilgrim Congregational...
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