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Life and travels of Colonel James Smith – Indian Captivities

James Smith, pioneer, was born in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, in 1737. When he was eighteen years of age he was captured by the Indians, was adopted into one of their tribes, and lived with them as one of themselves until his escape in 1759. He became a lieutenant under General Bouquet during the expedition against the Ohio Indians in 1764, and was captain of a company of rangers in Lord Dunmore’s War. In 1775 he was promoted to major of militia. He served in the Pennsylvania convention in 1776, and in the assembly in 1776-77. In the latter year he was commissioned colonel in command on the frontiers, and performed distinguished services. Smith moved to Kentucky in 1788. He was a member of the Danville convention, and represented Bourbon county for many years in the legislature. He died in Washington county, Kentucky, in 1812. The following narrative of his experience as member of an Indian tribe is from his own book entitled “Remarkable Adventures in the Life and Travels of Colonel James Smith,” printed at Lexington, Kentucky, in 1799. It affords a striking contrast to the terrible experiences of the other captives whose stories are republished in this book; for he was well treated, and stayed so long with his red captors that he acquired expert knowledge of their arts and customs, and deep insight into their character.

Biographical Sketch of Sampson Windsor

Sampson Windsor, of Prince William Co., Va., had four sons William, Christopher, Burton, and Alfred. Burton married Elizabeth Tinsley, and settled in Missouri in 1833. Alfred married Sarah Clark, and settled in Montgomery County in 1833. He had a son, John R., who married Mary A. Frzhugh, of Tennessee, and died leaving a widow and nine children, five sons and four daughters. William T., another son of Alfred Windsor, married Jane B. Bryan, a daughter of Reece Bryan and Jane Evans, by whom he had seven sons and four...

Biographical Sketch of John Leach

John Leach, of England, settled in Prince William Co., Va. His son William was married first to Fanny George, and they had Henry and Fanny. He was married the second time to Martha Clark, by whom he had William, Reason, Louisa, Martha, and Mary E. Henry married Frances Horton, and settled in Montgomery Co., Mo., in 1830. They had two sons and eight daughters. Fanny married John Robinson, who settled in Montgomery County in 1830. William died in infancy. Mary also died young. Reason, Laura, and Martha settled in Montgomery...

Biography of Samuel Bowman

Samuel Bowman, now of Coffeyville, where he is engaged in the real estate, insurance and loan business with his sons, is a Kansas resident of nearly thirty-five years and was long prominent in Labette County, where he served two terms as probate judge. His Bowman ancestors were German people who came to Pennsylvania in Colonial times. His grandfather, Benjamin Bowman, a native of Pennsylvania, was a farmer and cabinet maker, also a minister of the Dunkard Church, and spent many years in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia, where he died some years before Judge Bowman was born. It was in the valley of the Shenandoah, a mile from Harrisonburg, Virginia, that Samuel Bowman was born May 18, 1846. His father, John Bowman, was born in the same locality in 1790, and spent his life in that famous valley, engaged in farming and stock raising. He died at Harrisonburg in 1873. Though a resident of Virginia he was not in sympathy with the South on the issue of slavery, was a stanch Union man, and a whig and republican in politics. He was an active member of the Dunkard Church. John Bowman married Rebecca Wine, who was born in the Shenandoah Valley in 1802, and died on the old farm near Harrisonburg in 1872. A brief record of the children is as follows: Daniel, who was a Virginia farmer and died in that state; Catherine, who died in the Shenandoah Valley as the wife of Joseph Miller, also deceased. Elizabeth, who died in Virginia in 1915, and her husband Daniel Thomas, who was a farmer, is also deceased; John W....

Biography of John F. Richards

John F. Richards, born October 23, 1834, in Bath County, Virginia, the founder of the wholesale hardware house Richards & Conover Hardware Company of Kansas City, Missouri, and now residing at 200 Forty-fourth Street in that city, is not only one of the merchants who have risen to prominence in this section of the Middle West, but had a career connected by many experiences and activities with the Territory and State of Kansas. His parents were Walter and Nancy (Mayse) Richards, both natives of Virginia. Their old farm, Cloverdale, was situated on one of the stage lines which then crossed and recrossed the country before the railroad era, and this farm was also near a stage station where horses were changed. Mr. Richards’ maternal grandfather, Joseph Mayse, was a soldier in both the Revolutionary and Indian wars, and at one time was wounded in a battle with the Indians. Twenty years later his leg was amputated. The daughters of Walter and Nancy Richards were: Elizabeth Ann, who married William Saunders, at New Franklin, Missouri; Louisa, who became Mrs. Henry C. Miller of Arrow Rock, Missouri; Maria, who married Wesley Wickersham, who served in Colonel Hardin’s Illinois Regiment in the Mexican war; Mary Matilda, Mrs. Dr. A. F. Barnes of St. Louis, Missouri; the sons were William C., George Blackwell Shelton; Thomas and John Francisco Richards. In 1836 Walter Richards started with his family from Virginia for Missouri, proceeding to Guyandotte, a small town on the Ohio River. The parents and the younger children there embarked on a steamboat for Cairo, Illinois, and thence proceeded by boat to St. Louis....

Virginia Wills Before 1799

A complete abstract register of all names mentioned in over six hundred recorded wills, arranged alphabetically from Adams to Wright. Copied from the Court House Records of Amherst, Bedford, Campbell, Loudoun, Prince William and Rockbridge Counties of Virginia.

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