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Biography of Dr. W. S. Brown

W. S. Brown was born in Preble county, Ohio, September 16, 1824. His parents, Solomon and Lydia Brown, were both natives of New York, and when the subject of this sketch was but an infant they moved to Henry county, Indiana, where he was reared upon a farm and educated in the common schools. In the spring of 1847 he came to Missouri and settled in Harrison county on the 7th of May of the same year. He was appointed and served as the first postmaster at Bethany. While living in Bethany he engaged in mercantile business. In 1848 he came to this county and moved his stock of goods to Cravensville, but in 1851 abandoned the mercantile business and began the practice of medicine, which profession he had been studying for several years, and has made that his principal business since, together with farming. In 1858 he went to Texas, and after a stay there of eighteen months returned to this “county. He was elected justice of the peace in 1860. October 1, 1861, he enlisted in the six month service and was a lieutenant of the company commanded by Captain Bromfield. At the expiration of his time he again enlisted, this time in Company Thirty-third Regiment Enrolled State Militia, and was elected first lieutenant, and soon after was recommended and commissioned by the governor as colonel of the regiment, September 15, 1862, and was with the regiment when in service until the close of the war. In 1866 he was again elected justice of the peace, which place he filled four years, and has since held a...

Biography of Robert Pugh

One of the valuable acquisitions to the citizenship of Shawnee County was made about the close of the Civil war when Robert Pugh came to Kansas and became one of the pioneer homesteadors in Topeka and Tecumseh Township. During his active lifetime Robert Pugh developed a splendid estate as a farmer, and the qualities of his enterpriss descended to his only son living, Burton H. Pugh, who for many years had been one of the leading factors in the potato industry of the Kaw Valley. A native of Preble County, Ohio, Robert Pugh was born January 26. 1830, a son of Merritt Pugh. When a child his family removed to a farm in Cass County, Indiana, where he grew up. Such education as he acquired was from the district schools. In Cass County, Indiana, Robert Pugh married Susan Troutman. In 1865 they removed to Kansas, and Mr. Pugh bought 240 acres in the northeastern corner of Topeka Township and the southeastern corner of Tecumseh Township in Shawnee County. At that time the land was almost entirely unimproved. That was the stage of Robert Pugh’s subsequent labors, and in time he had his land developed into one of the most productive farms in the state. His death occurred in May, 1898. His widow, Mrs. Pugh, is still living and resided on the old farm with the only survivor of their four children, Burton Homer Pugh. The late Mr. Pugh was an active member of the Methodist Church. In politics he was a stanch republican, and he was a very well read man. Born on the farm where he now resided,...

Slave Narrative of James Campbell

Interviewer: Hallie Miller Person Interviewed: James Campbell Location: Gallipolis, Ohio Place of Birth: Monroe County WV Date of Birth: January 15, 1852 “Well, I’se bo’n Monro’ County, West Virginia, on January 15, 1852, jes’ few miles from Union, West Virginia.” “My mammy wuz Dinnah Alexander Campbell an’ my pappy wuz Levi Campbell an’ dey bof cum frum Monro’ County. Dat’s ’bout only place I heerd dem speak ’bout.” “Der wuz Levi, Floyd, Henry, Noah, an’ Nancy, jes’ my haf brudders an’ sistahs, but I neber knowed no diffrunce but whut dey wuz my sistahs an’ brudders.” “Where we liv? On Marsa John Alexander’s farm, he wuz a good Marsa too. All Marsa John want wuz plenty wurk dun and we dun it too, so der wuz no trubble on ouah plantashun. I neber reclec’ anyone gittin’ whipped or bad treatment frum him. I does ‘members, dat sum de neighbers say dey wuz treated prutty mean, but I don’t ‘member much ’bout it ‘caise I’se leetle den.” “Wher’d I sleep? I neber fergit dat trun’l bed, dat I sleep in. “Marsa John’s place kinda stock farm an’ I dun de milkin’. You all know dat wuz easy like so I jes’ keep busy milkin’ an’ gits out de hard work. Nudder thing I lik to do wuz pick berries, dat wuz easy too, so I dun my shar’ pickin’.” “Money? Lawsy chile, I neber dun seen eny money ’til aftah I dun cum to Gallipolis aftah der war. An’ how I lik’ to heah it jingle, if I jes’ had two cents, I’d make it jingle.” “We all had plenty...

Biography of David Maddock

David Maddock, who died in 1909, was a citizen of the type and virtues who should long be remembered not only among his descendants but by all who find encouragement and inspiration in a life of practical utility and a devotion to the best interests of mankind. Mr. Maddock lived in Champaign County for nearly half a century. He was born near West Elkton, Ohio, a son of Eli and Absillit (Woodward) Maddock. His father was a native of Ohio and his mother of North Carolina. When David was a young man, after he had obtained his education in the district schools, the family moved to Illinois and went through the experiences of pioneers on a farm in Vermilion County and later in Champaign County. On February 21, 1861, David Maddock married Jane H. Mills. Mrs. Maddock, who is now living in the village of St. Joseph, gave him the inspiration of her presence and her companionship for nearly half a century. She is a daughter of John and Elizabeth (Mendenhall) Mills, both of whom were born in Tennessee. They first moved to Ohio and later to Vermilion County, Illinois. Mrs. Maddock completed her education in the old Vermilion Seminary near Vermilion Grove. After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Maddock located five miles north of St. Joseph, where they bought 160 acres at $10 an acre. It was all virgin prairie, not a tree in sight, and it was possible to see over the prairies as far as Rantoul. They bought this home in 1865 and went through all the hardships and inconveniences devolved in making a good farm...

Biography of Felix G. Campbell

Felix G. Campbell was a thoroughly practical and successful farmer before he took up the business of real estate, loans and insurance at Champaign, and in both lines his success has been noteworthy. He is still a farmer through ownership, though no longer a worker in the fields, and he now gives all his time to an extensive clientage in real estate and insurance. Mr. Campbell was born in Preble County, Ohio, November 11, 1848, and was four years of age when his parents, John W. and Margaret N. (Dooley) Campbell, moved to Peoria, Illinois. His father was a native of Kentucky and his mother of Illinois. John W. Campbell spent his active career as a farmer, largely in Peoria County, and finally, when he and his wife retired, they went to live with their daughter Addie, at that time in Burton, Kansas, where both of them died. They were the parents of seven children: Mary E., David O., Charles L., Samuel, all deceased; Addie, wife of William H. Wilson of Wichita, Kansas; Felix G.; and George W. of Lincoln, Nebraska. Felix G. Campbell grew up on an Illinois farm, attended district schools, and remained at home until he was twenty-four. At that date he left home and lived on rented farms for about five years, when he bought eighty acres of his own and subsequently another eighty acres, this 160 acres constituting a very fine improved farm in Peoria County. Later Mr. Campbell bought 160 acres in Champaign County. He still owns both farms. In 1892 he removed to Champaign and for a quarter of a century has...

Biography of William M. Brown, M. D.

The medical fraternity is ably represented by Dr. William M. Brown, who is the leading physician of Cuprum, whither he removed in June of the present year, 1899, from Salubria, where he had continuously and successfully engaged in practice from June 1892. He was born in Preble County, Ohio, on the 18th of November, 1860. His ancestors were early settlers of South Carolina, and his grandfather, James Brown, was born in Due West, that state. James Scott Brown, the Doctor’s father, was a native of Preble County, Ohio, and having arrived at man’s estate he married Miss Julia Robertson, of Brighton, Iowa, who was born at Spring Hill, Indiana. He spent his entire life, however, near the old homestead where his birth occurred, and was an industrious, prosperous and honorable farmer. He and his wife were valued members of the United Presbyterian Church and exemplified in their daily lives their religious belief. Dr. Brown, the eldest in their family of nine children, eight of whom are yet living, was liberally educated and thus fitted for the responsible duties of life. Having attended the public schools of the Buckeye state, he further continued his studies in the university at Oxford, Ohio, and in Mommouth College, at Monmouth, Illinois. He was graduated in the Miami Medical College of Cincinnati, Ohio, in the class of 1888, having therein completed a course in medicine, after which he engaged in the practice of his chosen profession in Omaha, Nebraska, until June, 1892, when he came to Salubria. For seven years he made his home there and his practice constantly extended throughout the valley. In...

Biography of George F. Moore

The professional politician, clamorous, aggressive and spectacular, may appear more often in public and in the public print that the quiet, unassuming, judicious business man who takes a patriotic interest in politics because of the effect of politics on the prosperity of the people, but he is usually not so potent a factor in political movement and his influence is not so lasting, because it is likely to be exerted spasmodically, when the politician has in view some alluring official reward for political service, and it loses part of its effect upon the public because the public is always a little in doubt as to its disinterestedness. Yet the able man of affairs who does not seek office is often taken from his desk and given important public responsibilities because the people know that he will discharge them with an eye single to the public good. One of the most conspicuous examples of this kind in Idaho was in the election of Hon. George F. Moore to the office of lieutenant governor in 1896. George F. Moore was born in Lewisburg, Preble county Ohio, March 9, 1861, a son of Newton and Belle L. (Fall) Moore, natives of Ohio. The family removed to Kansas in 1868 and thence to Colorado in 1877. Newton G. Moore died ten years after that, aged about fifty-two. His widow lives at Wallace, Idaho. Hon. George F. Moore gained a common-school education in Kansas, and after the family went to Colorado helped his father in a freighting enterprise in which he was engaged there for a time. Later he mined and devoted himself to...

Biography of Winfield Freeman

Winfield Freeman. Lawyer, author, traveler, leader in republican politics and a business man, Winfield Freeman has been a Kansan for more than thirty-five years. He has long enjoyed a reputation as one of the foremost members of the bar in Kansas City, Kansas. He was born at London, Ohio, January 3, 1848, a son of James F. and Eleanor (Dawson) Freeman. His early life was spent in Winchester, Ohio, where he attended the public schools and where he read law in the office of Hon. A. Stiver. Admitted to the bar in 1869, at the age of twenty-one, he practiced law for a number of years in Ohio, and in 1878-79 served as prosecuting attorney of Preble County. Since 1879 he has been a resident of Kansas. From 1880 to 1884 he was assistant attorney for the Solomon Valley Railroad Company. In 1881 he was elected mayor of Minneapolis, Kansas. As one of the promoters of the Kansas City Elevated Railroad Company Mr. Freeman removed to Kansas City, Kansas, in 1884, and was actively identified with that transportation service as attorney until 1888. It is forty-eight years since he commenced the practice of law in Ohio in 1869, and his experience is a remarkably long one. He was associated with Silas Wright Porter, now associate justice of the Supreme Court of Kansas, from 1891 to 1899, and was also a partner with Hon. William J. Buchan, who for many years was representative and state senator. Another one of his professional associates was W. A. Johnston, now chief justice of the Supreme Court of Kansas. Judge Freeman has for many...

Biography of Lewis C. Nelson .

Lewis C. Nelson. The large industries in and about Coffeyville have naturally drawn to that city many of the expert technical men as well as business executives, and one of these is Lewis C. Nelson, superintendent of the Ludowici-Celadon Company, manufacturers of hollow roofing tile. Mr. Nelson as a young man became an expert wood worker, later developed a proficiency and familiarity with the pottery industry and for a number of years has been one of the trusted officials of the present company. His birth occurred in Glasgow, Scotland, July 15, 1871. His father Charles W. Nelson, who was born in the vicinity of Glasgow in 1842 was a weaver in the woolen mills, and died at Glasgow in 1884. He was a conservative in politics and an active member of the Episconal Church. He received military training as a soldier in the English army. Charles W. Nelson married Ida Froley, who was born near Glasgow in 1847 and died there in 1877. L. C. Nelson, the only child of his parents, was six years old when his mother died, and thereafter he received a rudimentary training in the public schools of Glasgow. At the age of twelve he was brought to the United States by his uncle John Nelson, who established his home at Boston. Since that time Mr. Nelson has been largely dependent upon his own resources for advancement. For two years he found such work as was fitted for his strength and ability in Boston, and he then began an apprenticeship in ornamental wood carving and modeling. He served a five year’s apprenticeship at Boston, and...

Biographical Sketch of Henry Bell

Henry Bell, farmer; P. O. Hutton; was born in Randolph Co., N. C., in the year 1819; his parents Pierce and Rebecca moved to Preble Co., Ohio., in the year 1820, and after remaining about fifteen years, moved to Rush Co., Ind., where they lived for about fifteen or twenty years; in 1850, they came to Coles Co. and settled on Sect 16, where his father died at the age of 88, his mother dying the year afterward. Mr. Bell moved to his present farm on Sec. 15 Feb. 14, 1856, containing 80 acres. In 1843, he married in Indiana Miss Sarah Cox (daughter of Isaac Cox, of North Carolina); she died in the year 1853; they had five children; one living, Mary (now Mrs. N. Dunbar, of Charleston), born March, 1866; and four died-Jane E., Sarah E., Eli and one that died in infancy. He married his second wife Mrs. Nancy Brewer (widow of Jesse Bell), Feb. 12, 1853; she died Aug. 5, 1875; they had eleven children, all living – Jonas V., born Nov., 10, 1854; Jesse B., Nov. 19, 1856; Lucretia, March 17, 1858; William H., June 10, 1859; Alman, Oct. 14, 1860; Louisa, June 23, 1862; John, Oct. 22, 1863; Margaret D., May 14, 1865; Charles M., Oct. 28, 1866; Susanna, August 23, 186S, and James E., born March 4,...
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