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Biography of Charles Proctor

Charles Proctor. The men who came in the early days to Kansas and stuck to their posts in spite of discouragements and setbacks, have with few exceptions gained all the prosperity that a man of ordinary ambition could erave. Such men possessed character as well as the ability to do hard work, and it is not strange that many of the public honors have been given to such citizens. One of this class in Cloud County is Mr. Charles Prostor of Miltonvale. He had lived a long and useful life and is now past fourscore. His years have ripened his judgment, and through all his experiences and relationships he had maintained unsullied a reputation for integrity of character. He was selected by the citizens of Miltonvale and adjacent territory to various offices of trust and responsibility and gave conscientious exactness to every public performance. From 1888 to 1892 he served Cloud County as county clerk for two terms. He was county commissioner one term and on the school board several terms. He established a postoffice one-half mile west of what is now Miltonvale, where he was postmaster until resigning the office to R. T. Modrell. Mr. Proctor was elected the first president of the Home State and now the Drovers State Bank of Miltonvale, and he was succeeded in that position by his son-in-law, Mr. Culp. Charles Proctor was born in Joe Daviess County, Illinois, in the extreme northwest corner of the state, November 10, 1835. His parents, Abel and Mary (Moffett) Proctor, were natives of Vermont and Maine respectively, and came to Galena, Illinois, in 1827 and were married there in 1829. One...

Slave Narrative of Miss Adeline Blakeley

Interviewer: Mary D. Hudgins Person Interviewed: Miss Adeline Blakely Age: 87 Home: 101 Rock Street, Fayetteville, Arkansas “Honey, look in the bible to get the date when I was born. We want to have it just right. Yes, here’s the place, read it to me. July 10, 1850? Yes, I remember now, that’s what they’ve always told me. I wanted to be sure, though. I was born in Hickman County, Tenn. and was about a year when they brought me to Arkansas. My mother and her people had been bought by Mr. John P. Parks when they were just children—John and Leanna and Martha. I was the first little negro in the Parks kitchen. From the first they made a pet out of me. I was little like a doll and they treated me like a plaything—spoiled me—rotten. After Mr. Parks came to Arkansas he lived near what is now Prairie Grove, but what do you think it was called then—Hog Eye. Later on they named it Hillingsley for a man who settled there. We were two miles out on the Wire Road, the one the telegraph line came in on, Honey. Almost every conmunity had a ‘Wire Road’. It was the custom to give a girl a slave when she was married. When Miss Parks became Mrs. Blakeley she moved to Fayetteville and chose me to take with her. She said since I was only 5 she could raise me as she wanted me to be. But I must have been a lot of trouble and after she had her baby she had to send me back to...

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