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Biographical Sketch of Horace E. H. Ruggles

The task of educating children of one of the peninsula’s most flourishing cities is the responsibility that falls on Horace E. H. Ruggles, supervising principal of the Burlingame schools. It was not long ago that Burlingame although destined to become one of the county’s leading cities, did not have a single school house within its boundaries. It was shortly after that Mr. Ruggles accepted his present position. With 217 children the Burlingame system was founded. In only three years the number of pupils increased to nearly 500. Burlingame has two handsome, modern, up-to-date school houses of which any community would be justly proud. A recognized feature of the Burlingame school system is the perfect co-operation between the teachers. To bring this about was one of Mr. Ruggles’ first undertakings; and succeeding in that he is now encouraging a closer relationship between the schoolroom and the home through the mutual efforts of the parents and teachers. Mr. Ruggles came to Burlingame well prepared for the responsibilities of his position. After a splendid primary and preparatory school education he attended the Potsdam Normal School in New York. After holding several teaching positions he became principal of the high school at Johnsonburg, Pennsylvania. Mr. Ruggles is a native of Vermont. He has lived in California for five...

Biography of Rev. Isaac G. Hubbard

Rev. Isaac G. Hubbard, at one time the rector of Trinity Church, Claremont, was born here, April 13, 1818, son of Isaac and Ruth (Cobb) Hubbard. His grandfather, George Hubbard, who was a Lieutenant in the Revolutionary War, came to Claremont in 1778 from Tolland, Conn. Judge J. H. Hubbard, of Windsor, a son of George, was one of the ablest lawyers in New England. He was a powerful man, and as a pleader at the bar he had few equals. Isaac Hubbard, another son, who settled in Claremont, became a successful farmer and stock-raiser. He was an influential man, served in different town offices, did much legal work, was Justice of the Peace, was considered a practical lawyer, and was prominent in the Episcopal church. He died in January, 1861, leaving a fine estate of some four hundred acres. By his first wife, a daughter of Ezra Jones, there was one child, a daughter, who married Charles F. Long, and had four children: Caroline, who died young; Charles H.; Isaac G.; and Charlotte B. The three last named are still living. His second wife, in maidenhood Ruth Cobb, daughter of Samuel Cobb, of Springfield, Vt., had four children. Amos, the eldest, now deceased, who was in the nursery business in Detroit, Mich., married Catharine, daughter of Samuel Fiske. She was half-sister of Philip Fiske, the donor of the Fiske Library in Claremont; and her mother was a sister of Paran Stevens, the famous hotel man of that place. The second child of Isaac Hubbard was Sarah M., who married the Rev. Joel Clapp, an Episcopal minister. Charles H....

Biography of Captain Harry C. Fay

Captain Harry C. Fay, editor-in-chief of the National Eagle, a bright and thoroughly up-to-date newspaper published in Claremont, was born in Richmond, Vt., November 30, 1830, son of Captain Nathan and Polly (Colby) Fay. Stephen Fay, his great-great-grandfather, was an early settler in Bennington, Vt., and was the father of eight children. His son John kept the Catamount Tavern, which during his day became a meeting-place for many great statesmen, who formed a legislative body, and held there meetings known as “Councils of Safety.” He, John, fell in the battle of Bennington. His son, Nathan Fay, served as a Colonel Warner’s command. Nathan, who was a cloth-dresser by trade, removed from Bennington to Richmond, Vt., about the year 1781, and established there a cloth-dressing house, which he carried on successfully for a number of years, leaving a flourishing business at the time of his death, which occurred at the age of seventy-seven. He married a daughter of Colonel Safford, a member of an old and prominent family of Bennington. Captain Nathan Fay, father of the subject of this sketch, continued the business of clothdressing after the death of his father; but, it subsequently becoming less profitable, he turned his attention in part to farming, and at the time of his death was the owner of one thousand acres of land. A member in early life of the Democratic party, he held office continuously for twenty-five years, representing his town in the legislature at six different periods, and serving it as Selectman throughout his public career. A good penman and a close student, he possessed also a fair knowledge of...

Thomas Coburn

4. THOMAS2 COBURN (Asa1) was b. Sept. 9. 1790; m. Feb. 11, 1817, Almira Stone of Cornish, dau. of Dea. Josiah and Hannah (Weld) Stone, b. Sept. 2. 1792, and d. Jan. 6. 1869. They lived in Potsdam, N. Y. Children: i. HORATIO NEWTON. b. Oct. 19, 1817: d. May 24, 1820. ii. HIRAM BREWSTER, b. April 3, 1819. iii. MARTHA ALMIRA, b. Nov. 7, 1820. iv. SARAH JOANNA, b. July 22,...

Biography of Chester P. Coburn

Among the well known and highly respected citizens of northern Idaho who have borne an important part in the development of the state is Chester P. Coburn, of Lewiston, whose name is enrolled among the pioneers who came to this section of the country in 1862. He aided in the organization not only of the state but of the territory, and has ever been a prominent factor in the progress and advancement which have wrought a marvelous transformation here. It is a well attested maxim that the greatness of a state lies not in its machinery of government, nor even in its institutions, but in the sterling qualities of its individual citizens, in their capacity for high and unselfish effort and their devotion to the public good. Regarded as a citizen, Mr, Coburn belongs to that public-spirited, useful and helpful type of men whose ambitions and desires are centered and directed in those channels through which flow the greatest and most permanent good to the greatest number, and it is therefore consistent with the purpose and plan of this work that his record be given among those of the representative men of the state. A native of Vermont, Chester P. Coburn was born in Rochester, that state, May 3, 1832. His ancestors were early settlers of New Hampshire and the Green Mountain state, and his grand-fathers, Abraham Coburn and Benjamin Stone, fought for the freedom and independence of the colonies in the Revolutionary war. His father, Thomas Coburn, was a native of New Hampshire, and in early life learned the tanner’s trade, but in later years became a farmer....

Biographical Sketch of Arthur Nathan Doud

Doud, Arthur Nathan; civil engineer; born, New York, 1872; son of George C. and Martha Dunbar Doud; graduated High School, Winthrop, N. Y., class of 1895; took three years special engineering course at Clarkson Technical School, Potsdam, N. Y., finished there in 1900; married, Buffalo, N. Y., Sept. 14, 1901, Nellie M. Wilson; two daughters; followed surveying and engineering work in New York state for three years; then engaged on the hydro-electric development on the St. Lawrence River; for two years and nine months member of the engineering corps, War Dept., U. S. Army, as chief of field party on location survey of forks and dams on the Ohio River, and in charge of lock construction until Oct., 1906; was for some time with Westinghouse. Church, Kerr & Co., on the construction of the New York Terminal of The Pennsylvania Rail-road; from Sept. 1, 1911, to the present time, mngr. of the Acme Equipment & Engineering Co., manufacturers of Doud handling equipment; member Cleveland Engineering Society and National Geographical Society; member Brasher Lodge, No. 541, F. & A. M., Brasher Falls, N. Y. Recreation: Hunting. Inventor and patenter of the Doud Steel Buckets and Cars for handling concrete and excavating...

Biography of Albion Brainard Allen

For more than three decades a resident of Amherst, Hampshire County, and one of this town’s most active and substantial business men, Mr. Allen’s operations as a builder have contributed very materially not only to the development of his own community, but to that of numerous other New England towns. On his father’s side he is a member of an old family whose name is very frequently met throughout the United States, where it is represented by many distinct and separate families. Its use arises from the Christian name Allen or Alan, which is very ancient and has many variations in spelling, a characteristic which the family name also possesses. There are no less than fifty-two coats-of-arms of separate and distinct families of Allen in the United Kingdom, besides twenty others of different spellings. There were more than a score of emigrants of this surname from almost as many different families who left England before 1650 to settle in New England and many of their early descendants have been identified with the formative period of New York history, from which region many able and worthy representatives of the family have come to many parts of the United States. Albion Brainard Allen is a representative of the eighth generation in descent from one William Allen, through the latter’s son William, the second William’s son John, and John’s son William. This William Allen of the fourth generation is thought to have been a cousin of Ethan Allen and of Major General Ira Allen of the Revolutionary War, the latter one of the founders of the University of Vermont at Burlington, Vermont....

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