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Narrative of the Captivity of Frances Noble – Indian Captivities

Narrative of the captivity of Frances Noble, who was, among others, taken by the Indians from Swan Island, in Maine, about the year 1755; compiled by John Kelly, Esq. of Concord, New Hampshire, from the minutes and memoranda of Phinehas Merrill. Esq. of Stratham, in the same state; and by the Former Gen. Tleman communicated for publication to the editors of the Historical Collections of New Hampshire.

Genealogy of Charles Allen Family

J132 CHARLES ALLEN: first mentioned in Portsmouth, N. H., in 1657. When he came to America is not known. He was born about 1625 and died about 1705. He married in 1667 Suzanna Huggins, of Hampton, N. H. This was evidently the second marriage of Charles, for in a deed conveying his lands and property in Greenland, N. H., to Suzanna Huggins, and dated 1666, he refers to his daughter Mary. by a former wife. He had by his second wife (1) Daniel, date of birth unknown, who m. Hannah Berry prior to 1705. He d. Jan. 22, 1746. He had John (date of birth unknown, who was adopted by his uncle, John Allen, in 1714. No record of his marriage, but he had Reuben, b. 1738; John, bapt. 1741), and Daniel, Jr., date of birth unknown, married twice, first wife unknown, second was Lydia Hicks, and they were married prior to 1756. The children by the first wife are Suzannah, Sarah and Josiah, who was b. May 31, 1744, married, 1779, Bathsheba Nelson, of Newmarket, N. H., b. June 30, 1755. He d. at Epsom, N. H., 1821; served in the Revolutionary War. Josiah had Joseph, b. Mar. 11, 1781 (m., 1812, Mary Batchelder and d. Feb. 22, 1863; no ch. shown); Josiah H., b. July 11, 1786 (m. Betsy Merrill and d. Mar. 11, 1869; no ch. shown); Ezra, b. July 17, 1790 (m., 1st, Feb. 10, 1814, Sarah M. Batchelder, of Deerfield; m., second, Sept. 6, 1849, Elizabeth Colby, of Hopkinton. He d. Dec. 31, 1865; no ch. shown), and others. (2) John: had six ch....

Biographical Sketch of Aldrich, Thomas Bailey

Aldrich, Thomas Bailey, son of Elias T. and Sara (Bailey) Aldrich, was born in Portsmouth, Rockingham County, N. H., November 11, 1836. He received his early education at the common schools in New Orleans, La., and at the Temple grammar school in Portsmouth. He commenced a course of study preparatory to entering college, but having the misfortune, in his fifteenth year, to lose his father, he abandoned that purpose, and entered the counting-room of an uncle, a merchant in New York. Her he remained for three years, and it was during that period that he began to contribute verses to the New York journals. A collection of his poems was published in 1855, the volume taking its name from the initial poem, “The Bells.” Mr. Aldrich’s most successful poem, “Babie Bell,” which was published in 1856, was copied and repeated all over the country. His next position was that of proofreader, and then reader for a publishing house. He became a frequent contributor to the New York “Evening Mirror,” “Putnam’s Magazine,” “The Knickerbocker,” and the weekly newspapers, for one of which he wrote “Daisy’s Necklace and What Came of It,” a prose poem which was afterwards issued in a volume, and attained a wide popularity. In 1856 Mr. Aldrich joined the staff of the “Home Journal,” continuing in this position for three years. He was also connected with the “Saturday Press,” and a frequent contributor to “Harper’s Monthly,” and the “Atlantic Monthly,” of which latter magazine he has for some years been the editor. Mr. Aldrich was married in New York, November 28, 1865. In 1866 he removed to...

Biographical Sketch of John Howard Webster

Webster, John Howard; assignee The Variety Iron Works Co.; born, Portsmouth, N. H., Nov. 8, 1846; came to CIeveland in 1850; public school education, graduated from Yale in 1868; degree A. B., Union Law College, 1870; degree LL. B.; received degree of A. M. from Yale in 1871; engaged in the practice of law in Cleverland until 1891, when he was appointed assignee for the Variety Iron Works Co.; still serving; pres. Chamberlain Cartridge & Target Co., Buckeye Milling Co.; vice pres. Penton Publishing Co.; interested in other corporations; member Union, University, Rowfant Clubs, Cleveland, and University Club, New Haven, Conn.; member Japan Society, London,...

Biographical Sketch of Charles P. Salen

Salen, Charles P.; born, Portsmouth, N. H., Dec. 5, 1860; came to Cleveland, 1867, educated, public schools and Concordia College; with West Side Sentinel and other papers 18784881; city clerk, 1883 and 1887-1880; returned to newspaper work, and in 1890, appointed sec’y Board of Elections; served until 1893; resigned, and entered the porkpacking business until 1899, when appointed city auditor; in 1901, appointed director of public works; served until 1903; opened the parks to the people; elected county clerk, 1902; first Democrat ever elected to this office; re-elected in 1905; in 1904, elected delegateat-large to National Democratic Convention; interested in a number of corporations and winter and summer...

Biography of Luther C. Tibbets

Luther C. Tibbets was born in South Berwick, York County, Maine, June 26, 1820. His father, James Tibbets, was a native of the same State and a farmer by occupation. The subject of this sketch was educated in the public schools and reared a farmer until seventeen years of age. He then located in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, first engaging as a clerk in mercantile houses, and later established a general merchandise store at Great Falls, New Hampshire, which enterprise he conducted until 1844, when be sold out the establishment to his brother. It is worthy of mention that the mercantile house he established nearly half a century ago is still in existence, conducted by his brother and descendants, under the firm name of E. A. Tibbets & Son. Mr. Tibbets continued his mercantile pursuits, establishing himself in Portsmouth, and later transferring the scene of his operations to Boston, Massachusetts, where he opened a wholesale grocery business. He remained there until 1852, and then seeking a broader field of operations located in New York. The next ten years were spent in a large wholesale grocery business. In 1862 he entered into produce and grain dealing, and became one of the heaviest grain operators in the city. At that time the war was in active prosecution; bread-stuffs and cereals were being “cornered,” and the Government as well as other consumers was a special mark for the greed of the speculators. Mr. Tibbets declined to enter into “rings,” and especially did lie decline to combine against his country in meeting the provision supply for her immense armies. This excited the enmity of...

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