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Candage Genealogy of Blue Hill, Maine

James Candage was the son of James and Elizabeth Candage, who settled upon the Neck in 1766 from Beverly, Mass., born May 9, 1753; married Hannah, daughter of John Roundy, April 13, 1775; she was born at Beverly, August 4, 1753; died March 12, 1851, aged 97 years, 7 months, 8 days; he died Jan. 12, 1819, aged 65 years and 8 months. Their children were: Elizabeth, Samuel, Gideon, Sarah, James, Azor and John.

A History of Peaks Island Maine and its People

A history of Peaks Island and its people: also a short history of House Island, Portland, Maine. In presenting this history of two of the best known islands in Portland Harbor, it has been the intention of the author to give only the story of the early days of those islands, and of the families who have contributed to their history.

Baxter Family of Norwich Vermont

The Baxters of this town came here from Norwich, Connecticut, a town which their ancestors with others from Norwich, England, assisted in founding about the year 1632. Elihu Baxter, with his young wife, Tryphena Taylor, to whom he was married October 24, 1777, arrived in Norwich the same year, and here fifteen children (six daughters and nine sons) were born to them, twelve of whom lived to grow up and have families of their own. Mr. Baxter settled on the farm that subsequently became the home of Hon. Paul Brigham. He later removed to the farm where Orson Sargent lives, and there built himself a frame house, a part of which is now in use by the present owner of the property. Of his children: William Baxter, the eldest, born August 3, 1778, studied law with Hon. Daniel A. Buck of Norwich, and removed to Bennington, Vt., where he soon became the leading lawyer in that part of the state, and received many honors from his town and county. He married Lydia Ashley of Norwich, August 17, 1779, and died at Bennington October 1, 1826, aged forty nine years. Hiram Baxter settled in Bennington a little after 1800. Elihu Baxter, Jr., the third child, born in 1781, died at Portland, Me., in 1863, where he had been in the practice of medicine for many years. Chester Baxter, born in 1785, died at Sharon, Vt., in 1863. He married Hannah Root and they had one daughter who married, Deane. James Baxter, the sixth son, born in 1788, established himself at Stanstead, L. C., in 1817, where he became very prominent...

Biography of John Shackford Kimball

John Shackford Kimball was an enterprising lawyer of Boston and a business man of Burlington, Ia. A son of David and Abigail (Perkins) Kimball, Pembroke, N.H., April 28, 1812. His descent from Michael Kimball, who married Bettie Runnells, came through David Kimball of the second generation and David Kimball of the third, who married Abigail Perkins. The fifth generation is now represented by John Stevens Kimball. Mr. Kimball’s parents died at Pembroke when he was thirteen years old, leaving nine children-Betsey, Asa, Perkins, John Shackford, Abigail, Sarah Towle (widow of Timothy Colby, of Concord ), Joseph, Mary Lewis (widow of Samuel B. Wright, of Burlington, Ia. ), and Harriet. Of these Sarah and Mary are living. Mary, who was about five years old at the death of her parents, subsequently lived in the family made famous at that time by the noted Prescott murder. Perkins, after spending some time in the printing business, was later employed in the Boston custom-house, and then kept a store in partnership with J. Frank Hoyt in Concord. On retiring from business, he returned to Hopkinton, and died there December 15, 1876. He first married Lydia Reed Wilde, of Boston, a sister of Joseph Wilde, of the well-known firm of Lawrence, Wilde & Co., furniture dealers, Cornhill, Boston. His second marriage was made with Savalla Mason, of Grafton, N.H., who survived him with one daughter, Sarah Underwood Kimball. Mother and daughter are now residents of Hopkinton, the latter being the present librarian of the Hopkinton Free Library. When a young man, John Shackford Kimball went to Concord and worked in a bakery. Afterward he...

Biographical Sketch of Nathaniel Parker Willis

Born in Portland, Maine, January 20, 1806, died at his country home, Idlewild, Cornwall-on-the-Hudson, January 20, 1867. His chief works are: Melanie, Lady Jane and other poems; Pencillings by the Way; Inklings of Adventure; Romance of Travel, comprising Tales of Five Lands; People I Have Met, or Pictures of Society and People of Mark; A Health Trip to the Tropics; Out of Doors at Idlewild; Paul Fane, or Parts of a life else Untold, a Novel. Edgar Allen Poe, in a review of the literary work of N. P. Willis said: “As a writer of `sketches’ properly so called, Mr. Willis is unequaled. Sketches especially of society, are his forte, and they are so for no other reason than that they afford him the best opportunity of introducing the personal Willis or more distinctly because this species of composition is most susceptible of impression from his personal character.” Among his short poems, perhaps the most popular are “May” and “The Belfry...

Biographical Sketch of Samuel N. Hawkes

Assistant attorney-general of Kansas with a residence at Topeka, Samuel N. Hawkes is one of the older members of the Kansas bar, and had been in active practice in various parts of the state for more than thirty years. He came to Kansas with a training and education received at one of the oldest eastern universities, and his career had been one of uninterrupted success and influential participation in the life of his own community and the state. He was born at Portland, Maine, May 8, 1861, a son of Charles M. and Susan A. (Whitney) Hawkes. His father, who was a wholesale shipper at Portland, up to 1870 and afterwards in the brokerage business there until 1875, moved his family in the latter year to New Haven, Connecticut, in order to educate his children. New Haven was his home the rest of his life. Reared in Portland, Maine, and New Haven, Connecticut, Samuel N. Hawkes followed his course in the common schools with preparatory work at Hopkins Grammar School in New Haven, and in 1879 was matrioulated in Yale University. He graduated B. A. in 1883, and two years later received his law degree LL. B. from the same university. Shortly after his graduation he came to Kansas, and practiced at Topeka and Lincoln Center until 1887, when he established his home at Stockton. Mr. Hawkes still maintains an office in Stockton and was in active practices there until January, 1911, when he became assistant attorney-general of the state. For three terms he served as county attorney, and was also city attorney of Stockton. Politically he is a...

Biography of William E. Leighton, M.D.

Dr. William E. Leighton, who is devoting his time to the practice of surgery in St. Louis, was born in Portland, Maine, May 9, 1892, a son of the late George W. Leighton, who was a descendant of an old Massachusetts family which was founded in Cohasset in the early part of the seventeenth century by one of the name who came from England. One of the ancestral lines is traced back to the Packard family of Boston. Later descendants participated in the Revolutionary war. George W. Leighton, the Doctor’s father, was in the granite business and during the Civil war was employed by the government in the lighthouse department on construction work. At one time he served as alderman of Portland and at all times was a stanch supporter of republican principles. He was also a thirty-second degree Mason and ever loyally followed the teachings and purposes of the craft. He married Alexina Drinkwater, a native of Maine, whose family originally came from Aberdeen, Scotland, the ancestral line being traced back to the early part of the sixteenth century. One of the name was knighted by an English king. To Mr. and Mrs. George W. Leighton were born four children, three daughters and a son, the latter being second in order of birth. The father departed this life in 1900, at the age of sixty years. The mother is still living and resides at the old home in Portland. Dr. Leighton, whose name introduces this review, attended the public schools of Portland and graduated from Bowdoin College with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. He then entered the...

Aucocisco

The name of the territory about Casco Bay and Presumpscot River, in the area now included in Cumberland County, Maine. It was also sometimes applied to those Abnaki Indians by whom it was occupied. Since the section was settled at an early date by the whites, the name soon dropped out of use as applied to the Indians, or rather it was changed to “Casco,” but this was a mere local designation, not a tribal distinction, as the Indians referred to were Abnaki. The proper form of the word is given by Willis as Uh-kos-is-co, ‘crane’ or ‘heron,’ the first syllable being guttural. These birds still frequent the bay. It is said by Willis to have been the Indian name of Falmouth (Portland),...

Biography of John Dovell

JOHN DOVELL. – Mr. Dovell is one of those men who have belabored fortune, and have knocked about the world until it is sufficient to turn one’s hair gray simply to listen to their adventures. A native of the Azores, of Portuguese parentage and born in 1836, he came to Portland, Maine, at the age of fourteen, and learned shipbuilding. He left in four years and plied his trade in New Orleans, shipping thence to Liverpool, and coming as ship’s carpenter from that foreign port to San Francisco. He soon came up the coast to Portland, Oregon, and worked upon the steam ferry Independence, building near the “South End Sawmill” by Powell, Coffin, “Preacher” Kelly, and Hankins, the captain, to run opposition to Stevens’ ferry. Starting for the Frazer river mines in 1859, he met a number of friends at Victoria, and, together with seventeen of them, put across the Georgian Gulf in rowboats, making a dangerous passage. They then followed up the river by the Skilloot route to Horse Beef bar, the company then separating and going to prospecting. Dovell made no strike. Some twenty of the company on the way back went down to the Littoot Lake, and in the absence of a boat to go down to Langley were compelled to take one by force from one Robertson, for which high-handed act they were arrested upon their arrival at Victoria three days after, and compelled to pay Robertson eighty-seven dollars. The judge gave Dovell ten dollars for his part taken in the matter. Returning to Portland, he worked in Jacob’s wagon shop, and in the spring...

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