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Menominee Indians

Menominee Indians were located on and near the Menominee River, Wisconsin, and in Michigan on or about the present location of Mackinac. The Menominee belonged to the Algonquian linguistic family and to the same section as the Cree and Foxes.

Biography of Alex Furgason

ALEX FURGASON. – One of the earliest pioneers of Union county, and one who has been a real pioneer of the pioneers, the subject of this sketch is eminently worthy to be represented in a work of the character of our volume, since also he has always maintained a bearing of uprightness and manifested principles of truth and probity, and has wrought during all the years of his domicile here for the development of the county’s resources and for the interests of all, while he has prosecuted successfully his private business enterprises. Mr. Furgason was born in Rouse’s Point, New York, on March 26, 1826, and there he was reared on a farm until he was nineteen years of age. He was well educated in the common schools of his native place, and at the age mentioned he departed from the parental roof and migrated to Pilot Mountain, in the Iron mountains of southwestern Missouri. In that place he assisted in establishing the Iron Mountain Works, where he wrought for three years, then returned to New York on a visit, whence he went to Portage, Wisconsin, and there engaged in lumber business for about fourteen years, or until 1862. In that year he was led by an adventurous spirit to join the Davis train, which was bound for Oregon and across the plains to Union county. While en route they frequently saw the gruesome signs of murdered people who had been slain and robbed by the Indians. Providence smiled on the train with which our subject traveled, and they made the trip without molestation from the savages. They arrived...

Biography of Hon. Orvin Kincaid

HON. ORVIN KINCAID. – Mr. Kincaid’s life has embodied very much of the rough romance of an untamed and mining country, and in its entirety would read like a tail of Arabia. He is a native of the granite state, having been born in Grafton, New Hampshire, in 1821. His father, a man of powerful physique, a blacksmith of Scotch-Irish parentage, gave him a training both at school and at the forge, and took the boy with him on his removals to Massachusetts and Vermont. Upon reaching his majority young Kincaid spent eighteen months in Ohio and the old West, but returned to Vermont for a few more years in school. In 1844, together with his father and a brother, he came to Wisconsin, establishing a blacksmith shop at Beloit, and three years later at Portage City, and finished his life in that state as a farmer at Otsego. In 1852 the great impulse that brought so many men to the Pacific seized him also; and joining a train of eighty wagons he journeyed steadily westward, performing an average of twenty-two and one-half miles per day over the old emigrant road. At Soda Springs, near Fort Hall, however, he found it necessary to dispose of his interest in the wagon to which he was attached. Taking a few crackers and dried beef as provisions, and one blanket, he continued the journey on foot, walking nine hundred miles to Placerville. For two years he was mining variously in California, Nevada and New Mexico. His further movements were rapid, and extended over a wide space. In 1856 he was back in...

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