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Native American History of Polk County, Georgia

Polk County is located in northwest Georgia. It was named after James K. Polk, 11th president of the United States. The county seat is Cedartown. Polk County is bounded on the north by Floyd County, GA and on the northeast by Bartow County, GA. On the south it adjoins Haralson County, GA. On the west, it is bordered by Cherokee County, Alabama and on the southwest by Cleburne County, Alabama. Geology and hydrology Most of Polk County is located in the Ridge and Valley geological region, which is characterized by multiple strata of Paleozoic sedimentary rocks deposited when eastern North America was flooded by the ancient Iapetus Ocean. Dolomitic limestone, limestone, sandstone, mudstone and shale are the dominant rock formations of the county. Caves and springs are common in the county. Much of the central part of Polk County ranges in elevation from 1000 feet down to 600 feet, which is about the same range as adjacent Bartow County to the northeast. There are two mountainous areas in the county. In the east, the low mountains rise up 1,316 feet at Carnes Mountain. In the more rugged northwestern part of the county, elevations reach 1,600 feet on top of Indian Mountain. A relatively small section in the southern section of the county is part of the Piedmont. It consists of slightly rolling hills and in general, contains smoother terrain than the remainder. Seasonal or permanent wetlands parallel many of its small streams. These are relatively narrow bands of soggy terrain that provide ecological diversity for animal and plant life. The top soils are thin over most hills and steep...

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