Early Exploration and Native Americans

De Soto and his band gave to the Choctaws at Moma Binah and the Chickasaws at Chikasahha their first lesson in the white man’s modus operandi to civilize and Christianize North American Indians; so has the same lesson been continued to be given to that unfortunate people by his white successors from that day to this,



Narrative of Robert Eastburn – Indian Captivities

A Faithful Narrative of the Many Dangers and Sufferings, as well as wonderful and surprising deliverances, of Robert Eastburn, during his late captivity among the Indians. Written by Himself. Published at the earnest request of many persons, for the benefit of the Public. With a recommendatory Preface by the Rev. Gilbert Tennent. Psalms 24, 6,



Narrative of the Captivity of Nehemiah How

Fort Dummer

A Narrative of the captivity of Nehemiah How, who was taken by the Indians at the Great Meadow Fort above Fort Dummer, where he was an inhabitant, October 11th, 1745. Giving an account of what he met with in his traveling to Canada, and while he was in prison there. Together with an account of Mr. How’s death at Canada. Exceedingly valuable for the many items of exact intelligence therein recorded, relative to so many of the present inhabitants of New England, through those friends who endured the hardships of captivity in the mountain deserts and the damps of loathsome prisons. Had the author lived to have returned, and published his narrative himself, he doubtless would have made it far more valuable, but he was cut off while a prisoner, by the prison fever, in the fifty-fifth year of his age, after a captivity of one year, seven months, and fifteen days. He died May 25th, 1747, in the hospital at Quebec, after a sickness of about ten days. He was a husband and father, and greatly beloved by all who knew him.



John Gyles Captivity Narrative – Indian Captivities

St John River Map

John Gyles captivity narrative provides a stunning display of Abenaki culture and lifestyle, as it was in the 1690’s. John was 10 years old when he was taken captive in the attack on Pemaquid (Bristol Maine) and his narrative provides an accounting of his harrowing treatment by his Indian captors, as well as the three years exile with his French owners at Jemseg New Bruswick. His faith in Christ remains central in the well-being of his mind throughout his ordeal.



Early Indian Wars in New England

Early New England Tribes Map

The history of the settlers of New England is fraught with the troubles of Indian hostilities. This is a history of the early Indian wars in New England. In 1620, a company belonging to Mr. Robinson’s church, at Leyden, in Holland, foreseeing many inconveniences likely to increase, from the residence of English dissenters under a



King Philip’s War – Indian Wars

King Philips War Map

A short history of the battles fought during King Philip’s War, including maps of the campaigns and New England Indian tribes.



1867 Plymouth Massachusetts Directory

Alexander J. rope maker, Court Alexander Samuel, carpenter, Spring Alexander Samuel L. machinist. Court Alexander Samuel T. shoemaker. Court Alien C. B. laborer, Mt. Pleasant Allen George, sea captain. South Allen Joseph, farmer. Sandwich Allen Sherman, sea captain, Warren Allen Sherman 2d, shoemaker, Warren Allen Winslow, seaman. Sandwich Andrews George F. editor O. C. Memorial,



History of Plymouth Massachusetts

An historical sketch about Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts as abstracted from the Plymouth County Directory and Historical Register of 1867. Includes a list of the men from Plymouth who gave their life during the Revolutionary War.



Descendants of Samuel Sturtevant

(1) Samuel Sturtevant, the immigrant ancestor of the family, was at Plymouth, Mass., as early as May 3, 1642; married in Plymouth in 1643, to Ann (surname unknown). ISSUE: Ann, b. June 4, 1647. John, b. Oct. 17, 1650. (2) Samuel, Jr., b. April 19, 1654; d. April 21, 1736. Hannah, b. Sept. 4, 1658.



New England Indians

Tribal Territories Southern New England

It is lamentable to reflect that in the primitive dealings between the venturous Europeans and aborigines of America, the kindly welcome and the hospitable reception were the part of the savage, and treachery, kidnapping, and murder too frequently that of the civilized and nominally Christian visitor. It appears to have been matter of common custom



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