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Hussey and Morgan Families of New Bedford MA

HUSSEY-MORGAN (New Bedford families). These families, while not among those early here, are of approximately a hundred years’ standing in this community, and with their allied connections are among the very respectable and wealthy families of the locality, the heads of two of these families here considered being the late George Hussey and Charles Wain Morgan, who were extensively engaged in whaling and shipping interests here in New Bedford through much of the first half of the nineteenth century. Here follows in detail arranged chronologically from the first American ancestor the Hussey genealogy, together with that of some of its allied connections, et cetera. Christopher Hussey, baptized 18th of 2d month, 1599, at Dorking, County of Surrey, England, son of John and Mary (Wood) of that place, and for a time in Holland, married Theodate, daughter of Stephen Batchelder, and came from London to New England in the same vessel with Mr. Batchelder, arriving at Boston in the “William and Francis,” in 1632. He probably remained at Lynn, where his father-in-law was sometime minister, until 1636, then went to Newbury and there resided a year or two. He was deputy in 1637, was one of the original settlers of Hampton in 1638, at which time his mother was there with him, and was active and prominent in citizenship for many years; was town clerk in 1650; selectman in 1650-58-64-68; was known as both “lieutenant” and “captain”; was one of the first deacons of the church; was deputy in 1658-59-60-72. Mr. Hussey was one of the nine purchasers of Nantucket, Mass., in 1659, but it is not known that he...

Wright Family of Boston, MA

WRIGHT. The family of this name is an early Boston family, which through marriage is allied with some of the historic families of New England, among them those of Adams, Winslow and Wentworth. We give herewith an outline of the earlier generations, beginning with the first ancestor in this country. (I) Richard Wright, born about 1607, died in Plymouth, Mass., June 9, 1691. In 1644 he married Hester Cook, and they had children: Adam, Esther and Mary. (II) Adam Wright, born about 1644, died Sept. 20, 1724. He was twice married, having by his first wife, Sarah (Soule), two children, John and Isaac, and by his second wife, Mehitable (Barrows), four children, Samuel, Moses, James and Nathan. (III) Samuel Wright, born about 1700, died Jan. 5, 1773. He was of Plympton. By his wife, Anna (Tillson), born about 1704, died Nov. 16, 1792, he had children as follows: Ruth, born Aug. 12, 1723; Ruth (2), March 1, 1725; Sarah, June 3, 1726 (married a Hall); Samuel, Oct. 6, 1728; Edmund, Oct. 28, 1730; Jacob, April 17, 1733; Lydia, Sept. 22, 1736. (IV) Jacob Wright, of Plympton, born April 17, 1733, son of Samuel and Anna (Tillson) Wright, died March 30, 1818. He married Deborah Torrey, of Weymouth, born Sept. 18, 1731, died Dec. 31, 1820. Children: Ann, born Jan. 1, 1753; Zadoc, April 17, 1754 (served in the Revolutionary war); Joseph, Oct. 31, 1756; Deborah, April 14, 1761; Edmund, July 26, 1763; Jabez, July 13, 1765; Silas, March 7, 1773 (died in Boston). (V) Edmund Wright, of Boston, born July 26, 1763, died in Boston, Dec. 10, 1837. He...

Early Exploration and Native Americans

De Soto and his band gave to the Choctaws at Moma Binah and the Chickasaws at Chikasahha their first lesson in the white man’s modus operandi to civilize and Christianize North American Indians; so has the same lesson been continued to be given to that unfortunate people by his white┬ásuccessors from that day to this, all over this continent, but which to them, was as the tones of an alarm-bell at midnight. And one hundred and twenty-three years have passed since our forefathers declared all men of every nationality to be free and equal on the soil of the North American continent then under their jurisdiction, except the Africans whom they held in slavery, and the Native Americans against whom they decreed absolute extermination because they could not also enslave them; to prove which, they at once began to hold out flattering-inducements to the so-called oppressed people of all climes under the sun, to come to free America and assist them to oppress and kill off the Native Americans and in partnership take their lands and country, as this was more in accordance with their lust of wealth and speedy self-aggrandizement than the imagined slow process of educating, civilizing and Christianizing them, a work too con descending, too humiliating; and to demonstrate that it has been a grand and glorious success, we now point with vaunting pride and haughty satisfaction to our broad and far extended landed possessions as indisputable evidence of our just claims to the resolution passed by our pilgrim ancestors, “We are the children of the Lord”; and to the little remnant of hapless, helpless and...

Narrative of Robert Eastburn – Indian Captivities

A Faithful Narrative of the Many Dangers and Sufferings, as well as wonderful and surprising deliverances, of Robert Eastburn, during his late captivity among the Indians. Written by Himself. Published at the earnest request of many persons, for the benefit of the Public. With a recommendatory Preface by the Rev. Gilbert Tennent. Psalms 24, 6, 7, and 193, 2, 4. Philadelphia: Printed. Boston: Reprinted and sold by Green & Russell, opposite the Probate Office in Queen street, 1753. Preface Candid Reader: The author (and subject) of the ensuing narrative (who is a deacon of our church, and has been so for many years) is of such an established good character, that he needs no recommendation of others where he is known; a proof of which was the general joy of the inhabitants of this city, occasioned by his return from a miserable captivity; together with the readiness of divers persons to contribute to the relief of himself and necessitous family, without any request of his, or the least motion of that tendency. But seeing the following sheets are like to spread into many places where he is not known, permit me to say that, upon long acquaintance, I have found him to be a person of candor, integrity, and sincere piety, whose testimony may with safety be depended upon; which give his narrative the greater weight, and may induce to read it with the greater pleasure. The design of it is evidently pious; the matters contained in it and manner of handling them, will, I hope, be esteemed by the impartial to be entertaining and improving. I wish it...

Narrative of the Captivity of Nehemiah How

A Narrative of the captivity of Nehemiah How, who was taken by the Indians at the Great Meadow Fort above Fort Dummer, where he was an inhabitant, October 11th, 1745. Giving an account of what he met with in his traveling to Canada, and while he was in prison there. Together with an account of Mr. How’s death at Canada. Exceedingly valuable for the many items of exact intelligence therein recorded, relative to so many of the present inhabitants of New England, through those friends who endured the hardships of captivity in the mountain deserts and the damps of loathsome prisons. Had the author lived to have returned, and published his narrative himself, he doubtless would have made it far more valuable, but he was cut off while a prisoner, by the prison fever, in the fifty-fifth year of his age, after a captivity of one year, seven months, and fifteen days. He died May 25th, 1747, in the hospital at Quebec, after a sickness of about ten days. He was a husband and father, and greatly beloved by all who knew him.

John Gyles Captivity Narrative – Indian Captivities

John Gyles captivity narrative provides a stunning display of Abenaki culture and lifestyle, as it was in the 1690’s. John was 10 years old when he was taken captive in the attack on Pemaquid (Bristol Maine) and his narrative provides an accounting of his harrowing treatment by his Indian captors, as well as the three years exile with his French owners at Jemseg New Bruswick. His faith in Christ remains central in the well-being of his mind throughout his ordeal.

Early Indian Wars in New England

The history of the settlers of New England is fraught with the troubles of Indian hostilities. This is a history of the early Indian wars in New England. In 1620, a company belonging to Mr. Robinson’s church, at Leyden, in Holland, foreseeing many inconveniences likely to increase, from the residence of English dissenters under a foreign government, and hoping to find an asylum, and a refuge from persecution in the New World, applied to King James for liberty to place themselves in some part of New England; and obtained a grant of some place about Hudson river. They set sail from Plymouth, in September, and after a boisterous passage found themselves in Massachusetts Bay, considerably to the north of their destination. But the approach of winter, and other causes, forced them to land at the nearest convenient spot, and on the 22d of December, 1620, they disembarked upon the spot afterwards called Plymouth. The settlers numbered one hundred and one persons. After this beginning, other settlements were established at favorable points on the coast. The principal tribes in the neighborhood of the settlers were the Pequods, the Mohicans, the Narragansetts, and the Wampanoags. Some of these Indians displayed their hostility soon after the settlement was begun at Plymouth; but the majority of them seemed disposed to friendship. On the 16th of March, 1621, the whites were surprised by an Indian coming boldly alone into Plymouth, and crying out, “Welcome, Englishmen! welcome, Englishmen!” He was the Sagamore of a neighboring tribe, and named Samoset. He had learned to speak broken English from the fishermen, who came to the coast. Through...

1867 Plymouth Massachusetts Directory

Alexander J. rope maker, Court Alexander Samuel, carpenter, Spring Alexander Samuel L. machinist. Court Alexander Samuel T. shoemaker. Court Alien C. B. laborer, Mt. Pleasant Allen George, sea captain. South Allen Joseph, farmer. Sandwich Allen Sherman, sea captain, Warren Allen Sherman 2d, shoemaker, Warren Allen Winslow, seaman. Sandwich Andrews George F. editor O. C. Memorial, Court Arthur J. P. sea captain, Court Arthur Richard, rope maker, Court Atwood A. J. merchant, Summer Atwood A, V. sea mail. Market Atwood Edward B. watchmaker, Main Atwood E. W. jeweler. High Atwood Fred, shoemaker, Chiltonville Atwood George H. shoemaker. So. Pond Atwood J. M. clerk. Summer Atwood J. R. seaman, Leyden Atwood John, deputy sheriff, Summer Atwood John M. merchant. Summer Atwood Thos. jr., shoemaker, Sandwich Atwood T. B. shoemaker, Sandwich Atwood T. C. stonecutter, Rowland Atwood William, seaman, Russell Atwood William, 2d, merchant. Summer Avery Ebenezer, printer. North Avery Winslow, printer. Pleasant Badger Chas. ironsmith, Summer Badger C. B. ironsmith, Summer Badger E. 1). ironsmith. Summer Bagnall George, truck man. Water Bagnall Ichabod P. seaman Main Bagnall Joseph, truck man, Water Bagnall Oliver, laborer. Prospect Bagnall Richard S. carpenter. Water Bagnall Richard W. carpenter, Sandwich Bailey George, seaman, Sandwich Bailey H. P. tinsmith. Summer Baker Edward, seaman, Russell Baker William W. seaman. Court Ballard S. D. saloon keeper, Main Baldwin S. T. seaman. Water Baldwin Wm. M. fish dealer. Spring Bancroft Arvin N. seaman, Sandwich Barlow George, wool spinner. Court Bai-low John, rope maker Court Barnes Albert, merchant North Barnes Benjamin, merchant Sandwich Barnes B. F. machinist, Sandwich Barnes Bradford, fish dealer, Cole’s Hill Barnes C. C. harness maker. Summer Barnes...

History of Plymouth Massachusetts

An historical sketch about Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts as abstracted from the Plymouth County Directory and Historical Register of 1867. Includes a list of the men from Plymouth who gave their life during the Revolutionary War.

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