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James Wilson Genealogy

I. The ancestor of the Daniel2 Wilson family came from Tyrone, Ireland, in 1737, with the famous Scotch Irish emigrants. These emigrants were a hardy, industrious, long-lived, honest and sturdy race of people. A great proportion of New Hampshire’s most distinguished sons are found among their descendants. One of these emigrants was James1 Wilson. The history of Peterborough gives his name as WILLIAM. Later researches favor JAMES, but we are not positively sure of the name. Nor do we know who was his wife. They brought with them from Ireland a son, Robert2, and a daughter, Lettuce2. In this country they had at least two more sons, Daniel2 and James2. Robert2 lived in Peterboro’ and was the father of Anne3 (killed by a log falling from a fence upon her, in childhood), Hon. James3, William3, Anne3 (who m. Jeremiah Swan), Mary3 (who m. Gen. John Steele), Hon. John3 of Belfast, Me., (in the U. S. Congress in 1813-1814), Joseph3 and Sarah3 (m. Hon. John Scott Harrison, son of President William Henry Harrison, 9th President of the U. S. and father of Benjamin Harrison, 23rd President of the U. S.) Hon. James3 Wilson of Peterboro and Keene was the father of Gen. James4 Wilson, the well known lawyer and orator of Keene and a member of the 30th and 31st U. S. Congresses; Col. Robert4 Wilson, who was a well known character in Keene; Elizabeth Jane4 (who m. William G. Hunter); and Sarah M. A.4, who m. Col. Frank Lee of Boston. The emigrant, James1 Wilson, spent the winter of 1737-8 in West Cambridge, Mass., and then moved to Townsend,...

Biography of Robert Wilson Turner, Hon.

Hon. Robert W. Turner. One of the most distinguished citizens of Kansas, Hon. Robert Wilson Turner had been a prominent practitioner of the Mankato and Jewell county bar for more than a quarter of a century, and during this time, as well as prior thereto, a leading figure in public life. His public service had been of great practical value not alone to his community, but to the state and the country, and while his fearless independence, both of speech and politieal action, had at times brought him into conflict with other state and national leaders, it had decidedly raised him in public estimation. Robert Wilson Turner, ox-consul general to Spain, was born at Plattsburg, New York, February 4, 1858, a son of Robert Wilson and Martha (Galbreath) (Butler) Turner. His paternal grandfather was Samuel W. Turner a native of England, who was a Government contractor in firearms, and died at Castle Dublin, Ireland, while his maternal grandparents were Samuel and Jane (Lilly) Galbreath, of County Antrim, Ireland, ardent adherents of the principles of Robert Emmet, the great Irish patriot. Robert Wilson Turner, the elder, was born in 1837, at Castle Dublin, Ireland, where he was reared, and during the Crimean war of 1854-56 served in the Thirty-ninth H. M. Infantry, participating in the battles of Alma, Balaklava and Inkermann and the siege of Sebastopol. In 1856 he left the English army and came to America, first locating at Montreal, Canada, where he was married to Mrs. Martha (Galbreath) Butler, widow of Dr. Fred Butler, a preceptor in McGill’s Medical College of Montreal. Sho was born in 1832, at...

Biography of Thomas P. Smith

Thomas P. Smith was born in Clinton County, New York, in 1861, and died in Muskogee, Okla., on October 4, 1917. He attended the village school of Clinton until he was twelve years of age, when his family moved to Plattsburg, N. Y., where he entered the public schools. Graduating from the high school, he became associated in the mercantile business with his two brothers, M. A. and M. J. Smith. In 1884 he was made deputy postmaster at Plattsburg, which place he held until 1887, when he was appointed chief clerk at the San Carlos Indian Agency in Arizona. In 1888 he came to Indian Territory as agent for the Osage and Kaw with headquarters at Pawhuska. Mr. Smith camped on the sod in Guthrie, with the other pioneers, at the great opening in 1889. Removing to Muskogee, he associated himself with the Turner Hardware Company. In 1893 he was appointed United States Indian inspector and in 1894 he was made assistant Commissioner of Indian Affairs at Washington. While in Washington on November 27, 1895, he was married to Belle Granger of Zanesville, Ohio. Three children were born of this union, Lawrence Granger Smith, who graduated from West Point in 1920, now serving with the Fourteenth U. S. Cavalry; two daughters, Emily E. Smith and Annabel G. Smith, both of Muskogee. Mr. Smith remained in Washington during the Cleveland administration and through six months of the Harrison administration. When he was relieved he was sent to San Francisco, Calif., on government business, but he soon re-signed to be secretary of the Pacific Coast Hardware & Metal Association, a...

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