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Biography of William T. Cohenour

William T. Cohenour, a prominent and well known representative of the automobile business in Muskogee, established his agency in 19 9 and through the intervening period ha s built up a substantial trade. He came to the southwest from Illinois, his birth having occurred in Pittsfield, Pike county, that state, on the 7th of March, 1877. He is a son of Howard A. and Mary (Cope) Cohenour. The father was a farmer and breeder of fine stock, making a specialty of cattle and hogs. William T. Cohenour was reared in his native state, spending his youthful days under the parental roof. He acquired a high school education and afterward continued his studies in the Bradley Technical Institute at Peoria, Illinois. In 1903 he came to Muskogee, where he has since made his home. Here he engaged in the retail jewelry business and his name has figured in connection with commercial activity in the city. When he first took up his abode here he purchased property and built the first store building at Porter, Oklahoma. In Muskogee he became identified with banking but since March, 1919, he has concentrated his efforts and attention upon the automobile business. For about three years he has given his attention to the sales of Chalmers and Maxwell cars and his annual patronage has become of a most gratifying character. He thoroughly knows the cars which he handles and the demands of the public and he possesses the qualities of salesmanship in large degree. Moreover, he is actuated by a laudable ambition that is manifest in intense and intelligently directed activity. On the 10th of...

Biographical Sketch of George W. Harris

GEORGE W. HARRIS. – This successful business man of Morrow county was born at Pittsfield, Pike county, Illinois, February 18, 1858. During his minor years he followed the fortunes of his parents, who moved to Iowa in 1860, and four years later crossed the plains to California with ox-teams, locating at Red Bluff. In 1865 they came to Oregon and located at Monmouth. From that date many changes and removals were undergone, including a return to California, a residence at Corvallis and again at Eugene; also a trip across the continent to Missouri, Texas and Iowa, and a return to Oregon, where a home was made at Bethel, Polk county; and in 1880 a final settlement at Pendleton. During these wanderings George received a good, common-school education, and upon reaching adult life studied medicine three years with his father with the expectation of taking a full course at some medical institute and receiving a degree, although he never completed the design. Soon after coming to Umatilla county, he began business for himself, making his first effort in agriculture. The winter of 1884 he spent at Portland in attendance upon the business college. With this further equipment for business, he returned to Pendleton and engaged as clerk the following year in a drug store. In 1885 he discovered, or made for himself, a suitable opportunity at Lexington, Oregon, and coming hither opened a drug business, which he successfully continues to the present time. He was appointed postmaster in the fall of 1886, and still retains the position. He also handles implements for Frank Bros. of Portland, and deals wholesale in...

Biography of Mrs. Dr. Mary C. E. Kellogg

MRS. DR. MARY C.E. KELLOGG.- Mrs. Mary C. Edwards Morand, who became the wife of Doctor George Kellogg in 1879, and is now continuing the work and manufacturing the remedies of her husband, was born in Illinois, and received her education in Pittsfield, and at the Jacksonville Seminary, of which Doctor Jaques was president. In early life she was much of an invalid, and for her own improvement read medicine, looking closely into the systems of allopathy and hydropathy, and taking also a course under the celebrated phrenologist, Professor O.S. Fowler, of New York, and afterwards studying with Doctor P.W. Shastid, of Pittsfield, Illinois. At the age of seventeen she was married to W.C. Morand, M.D. Of the two sons born of this union, one is Doctor W.E. Morand, now a physician in Portland; and the other is Elmer E. Morand, a farmer at Silver Creek, Washington. Coming to Oregon for her health in 1874, she was married five years later to Doctor George Kellogg, through whom she had received essential aid for consumption, from which she was suffering. She began at once the study of his system, and soon mastered the art of making his remedies. These medicines have gained a wide reputation on this coast, and are even in considerable demand in the Eastern states. The well-known home remedies, Balsam of Life, Family Liniment, Compound Cathartic Bitters, Golden Liniment for Catarrh, Golden Urinary Specific, Lung Balsam, and Cough Drops, are all compounded under her supervision, and are made almost exclusively from our native herbs and plants. Their great value has been recognized not only in a private...

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