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Biography of William O. Smith

William O. Smith. For more than half a century a resident of Champaign County, William O. Smith is known to the people of this section as a man who did his brave and efficient duty in the Civil W T ar, as an active and industrious farmer, and as one who in all the relations of a long and busy life has lived up to the best standards of citizenship. He is also known through his children, a number of whom now occupy worthy and honorable places in community affairs. Mr. Smith was born at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, January 5, 1839, a son of S. B. and Mary Ellen (Sheperd) Smith. His father’s native home was near Harper’s Ferry, Virginia. William O. Smith was one of a family of five sons and two daughters. In 1846, when he was seven years of age, the family removed to Sangamon County, Illinois, and rented a house in Sheldon’s Row in the city of Springfield. For two years they had the distinction of living in the same house with Abraham Lincoln and his wife. The house was a double apartment, the Smiths occupying one side and the Lincolns the other. S. B. Smith served eighteen years as justice of the peace in Sangamon County. Mr. W. O. Smith as a boy attended the Lake Creek District School in Sangamon County. After leaving the common schools and working for a year he realized the need of more education and saved and earned the money necessary to give him a course in the Springfield High School. While in high school he was invited to join...

Biographical Sketch of Charles Criswell Arbuthnot

Arbuthnot, Charles Criswell; professor of Economics, W. R. U.; born, Pittsburg, Pa., May 30, 1876; son of James M. and Rebecca M. Criswell Arbuthnot; B. S., Geneva College, 1899; asst. in History, 1899-1900; Fellow in Political Economy, Univ. of Chicago, 1901-03; Ph. D., 1903; Instructor in Political Economy, Univ. of Nebraska, 1903-04; Adjunct Professor, 1904; Instructor in Economics, Adelbert College, and the College for Women, W. R. U., 1904-08; associate professor of Economics, 1906-08; professor of Economics, 1908-; member American Economic Ass’n, American Academy of Political and Social Science; Haymarket District Committee of Associated Charities; Board of Management of University Branch, Y. M. C. A.; member Cleveland Chamber of Commerce, chr. Sub-Committee on Smoke Prevention; The Civic League of Cleveland and Men’s League for Women’s Suffrage; member The City Club; contributor to journals on economical topics; interested in vocational guidance plans for the Y. M. C....

Biography of David Warnock

In the spring of 1869, two families, David Warnock and Joseph Ferguson, were crossing Iowa to settle in Ida County. The Warnock family had originated in Ireland and had been at Dubuque Co., Farley, Iowa. They traveled the distance to Ida County from Dubuque Co. in a covered wagon, and arrived on June 10, 1869. Only 7 families resided in Ida County at that time. Soon after they arrived, they broke the sod on their land. Richard Warnock was Dave Warnock’s father, and Dave’s mother was Frances. The parents were Irish. They waited a year or two before they left Farley, Iowa, for Ida County near where Battle Creek is today, to join their sons’ families. Their children were David, James, Margaret, Samuel, George, Frank, William, and Lowry. David had married Mary Ferguson on his covered wagon travels to Ida County, and then established a blacksmith shop in the winter of 1870 on the east side of the hill directly south of where the Maple River bridge was later built. He had the shop for 6 or 7 years. If he needed to collect a bill, he’d “go after it.” Dave was born at Allegheny City, Pa. on Sept. 5, 1846. At the age of 8 he was living with his family at Dubuque, Iowa, and helped his father on the farm. He did hold a position of fireman on a steam boat, covering the river route from Dubuque to St. Paul before coming to Ida County. When in Ida County, he carried mail for 3 years, via the pony express, between Ida Grove and Mapleton. The pony express...

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