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Indians of the Pike’s Peak Region

Including an Account of the Battle of Sand Creek, and of Occurrences in El Paso County, Colorado, during the War with the Cheyenne and Arapaho, in 1864 and 1868 For the most part this book is intentionally local in its character. As its title implies, it relates principally to the Indian tribes that have occupied the region around Pike’s Peak during historic times. The history, habits, and customs of the American Indian have always been interesting subjects to me. From early childhood, I read everything within my reach dealing with the various tribes of the United States and Mexico. In 186o, when I was fourteen years of age, I crossed the plains between the Missouri River and the Rocky Mountains twice, and again in 1861, 1865, and 1866; each time by ox or horse team, there being no other means of conveyance. At that time there were few railroads west of the Mississippi River and none west of the Missouri. On each of these trips I came more or less into contact with the Indians, and during my residence in Colorado from 186o to the present time, by observation and by study, I have become more or less familiar with all the tribes of this Western country. From 1864 to 1868, the Indians of the plains were hostile to the whites; this resulted in many tragic happenings in that part of the Pike’s Peak region embracing El Paso and its adjoining counties, as well as elsewhere in the Territory of Colorado. I then lived in Colorado City, in El Paso County, and took an active part in the defense...

Biography of Alexander E. Mayhew

The rewards of purity in public life are many, but one of the most important and apparent is continuance in public life. This is true everywhere, and of course it is true in Idaho, where the fact is emphasized and illustrated by the career of Judge Mayhew of Wallace, Shoshone County, Idaho. At least he lives at Wallace, but he is a man of the west and for the west, and his influence is active and far-reaching. Alexander E. Mayhew, son of Samuel and Elizabeth (Conklin) Mayhew, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, March 31, 1830. His father, a native of Philadelphia, was for many years a merchant of that city, but died in New Jersey in 1871, and his mother, born in Philadelphia, died in New Jersey, in 1887. The boyhood days of Judge Mayhew were passed in Philadelphia, where he attended the public schools and was graduated from the University of Pennsylvania, with the class of 1852. He read law under the preceptorship of William D. Baker, one of the leading Philadelphia lawyers of his time and one of the most successful in the country, and in 18c; q he located at Atchison, Kansas, where he continued his legal studies in the office of Abel & Stringfellow, being admitted to the bar in 1856. He entered upon the practice of his profession in Atchison and served one year as city attorney. In 1859 he went to Pike’s Peak, Colorado, where he practiced law and was connected with mining interests, and there he remained until 1864, when he removed to Helena, Montana, whence he went later to Deer Lodge,...

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