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Quapaw Indians

Quapaw Tribe: Meaning “downstream people.” They were known by some form of this word to the Omaha, Ponca, Kansa, Osage, and Creeks. Also called: Akansa, or Arkansas, by the Illinois and other Algonquian Indians, a name probably derived from one of the Quapaw social subdivisions. Beaux Hommes, a name given them by the French. Bow Indians, so-called probably because the bow wood from the Osage orange came from or through their country. Ima, by the Caddo, probably from one of their towns. Papikaha, on Marquette’s map (1673). Utsushuat, Wyandot name, meaning “wild apple,” and referring to the fruit of the Carica papaya. Quapaw Connections. The Quapaw were one of the five tribes belonging to what J. O. Dorsey (1897) called the Cegiha division of the Siouan linguistic stock. Quapaw Location. At or near the mouth of Arkansas River. (See also Louisiana, Kansas, Mississippi, Oklahoma, and Texas.) Quapaw Villages Tongigua, on the Mississippi side of Mississippi River above the mouth of the Arkansas, probably in Bolivar County, Miss. Tourima, at the junction of White River with the Mississippi, Desha County, probably the town’ elsewhere called Imaha. Ukakhpakhti, on the Mississippi, probably in Phillips County. Uzutiuhi, on the south side of the lower course of Arkansas River not far from Arkansas Post. Quapaw History Before the French became acquainted with this tribe (in 1673) the Quapaw had lived on Ohio River above its junction with the Wabash, and that portion of the Ohio was known as Arkansas River by the Illinois from this circumstance. It was formerly thought that the Pacaha or Capaha met by De Soto in this part of...

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