Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

In Possession Of The “Promised Land”

Monday, Nov. 22, 1819.–This day breakfasted with Mr. R. Morrison and dined with Mr. W. Morrison. These gentlemen are wealthy and live in very comfortable style. Mrs. R. Morrison is one of the most intelligent women that I have conversed with, and possesses a lady’s privilege, while Mrs. W. Morrison might rank, in point of beauty with some of the belles of Philadelphia. Dr. Hill having accomplished his business, we set out from Kaskia at 2 o’clock, after bidding a friendly farewell to many new friends made in this place. I must confess I found a few possessing so much more merit than I anticipated that I parted with them reluctantly. Traveled twelve miles, and arrived at Mme. LeCount’s. We supped with a tableful of French. Not one of them could speak English. Pumpkins, spoiled venison and rancid, oily butter for supper, added to the odor of a few ‘coons and opossums that were ripening in the sun, induced us to cut our comfort short. During the night I was taken ill with rheumatism. Bled myself largely. Set out at 6 o’clock in the morning rather better, though dull. Passed some small lakes full of ducks and geese. Saw seven deer, some wild turkeys and other game. Retraced our former steps. Passed Cahokia, a small and unimproving village, and arrived at the town of Illinois at 7 o’clock p. m. Wednesday, Nov. 24.–Crossed over to St. Louis to inquire for old friends or acquaintances from Philadelphia. Even an enemy would have been taken by the hand, but to my disappointment there was no arrival. Recrossed the Mississippi, and set...

Biography of Bethina Angelina Owens-Adair

MRS. DR. OWENS-ADAIR. – Berthina Angelina, the second daughter of Thomas and Sarah Owens, was born February 7,1840, in Van Buren county, Missouri. She saw her fourth birthday in her father’s Western home on Clatsop Plains, Clatsop county, Oregon, her parents having made the then dangerous and tedious journey across the then dangerous and tedious journey across the plains with ox-teams in the summer and fall of 1843. At this time Berthina was a small child, delicate in stature for her age, and having a highly nervous and sensitive nature, but with a strong, vigorous constitution, thus early showing a good physical foundation for great perseverance and endurance. The country reached by her parents was new to them, and virtually unoccupied, save by Indians. It was a wilderness unbroken by the means and appliances of our civilization, with no visible evidence of its immediate settlement and development. If it were a nice thing to do for these elder people to leave their old established homes, social relations and open markets, thousands of miles away, and come into this new land, from which they could not return, their experience at the end of the journey taught them that they had retraced their steps in their lives to what appeared to be a childish adventure, and to a place where a child might lead them. This young girl was now as old as were her parents in all of their new surroundings. And we offer this beautiful thought here, that seems like a mirror, as it were; for it reflected the impression of the future of this household: “The gloomiest day...

Biography of A. W. Patterson, M.D.

A.W. PATTERSON, M.D. – Doctor Patterson was born in Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, October 14, 1814. He received his scholastic education in the village of Freeport, of his native state, and afterwards entered the Western University, at Pittsburgh. He subsequently studied medicine in the office of Doctor J.P. Gazzam, an old and prominent physician of that city, and in 1841 graduated with high honors from the Pennsylvania College of Medicine, of Philadelphia. Coming westward, he located at Greenfield, Indiana, and there practiced his profession until 1852, when he concluded to come to Oregon, and began the long and tedious journey known only to the pioneer. After his arrival he went to Lane county and there settled upon a Donation claim near the present site of the flourishing town of Eugene. The settlers in those days being few and far between, there was but little call for those skilled in his profession; and, being conversant with civil engineering, he engaged in the surveying business for a time. Among the contracts taken were several for the government, they being both in Oregon and Washington. The reports of surveys to be found in the surveyor-general’s office, submitted by him, will attest the guidance of a master hand. He also laid off the townsite of Eugene City. On the outbreak of the Indian war of 1855-56 in Southern Oregon, he at once offered his services for the subjugation of the savages. He was commissioned and served, for a time, as first lieutenant, and afterwards as surgeon of the medical department. The Doctor has also served the commonwealth in the legislative field, serving as representative...

Biographical Sketch of William A. Wiseman

William A. Wiseman, a well known physician of Camargo, where he has been in successful practice for several years, was born at Waterloo, Lawrence County, Ohio, January 1, 1853, and is a son of Abner and Martha J. (Irwin) Wiseman. His father was a native of Virginia and his mother of Ohio. Isaac Wiseman’s grandfather was also born in Virginia and his maternal grandfather, George Irwin, was born in Virginia. Dr. Wiseman was reared in his native County, where he attended the public schools and subsequently, in 1878, became a student at DePauw University, where he pursued a regular college course for three years and a half. In 1882 he commenced the study of medicine in the office of Dr. C. Patterson and in 1883 went to Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, and was graduated there from in the class of 1886. While at Philadelphia he took special courses in skin diseases and also in gynecology and gained practical experience at the Philadelphia Lying-in Hospital. In the spring of 1886 he located at Camargo in the practice of his profession and here he has built up a successful practice. In political opinion the Doctor is a consistent Prohibitionist, and is also a member of the Modern Woodmen and Court of Honor. In 1875 he was married to Miss Emma C. Carrel, of Dennison, Ohio. They have three children: Eva C., Omer D. and Meda...

Biography of Capt. John Harper

Capt. John Harper was a native of Philadelphia; and followed the sea for many years after he was grown. In 1750 he settled in Alexandria, Va., where he died in his 87th year. He was married twice, and had twenty-nine children, eighteen sons and eleven daughters. Charles, the youngest son by his first wife, married Lucy Smither, who was of Scotch descent, and by her he had two children. He was married the second time to a Miss January, by whom he had nine children. The second son of his last wife, whose name was Charles B., was born in Culpepper Co., Va, in May, 1802. He was married in 1823 to Anna. C. Price, of Pittsylvania Co., Va., and settled in Montgomery Co., Mo., in 1830. He was engaged in merchandising at Danville for five years, and one year on his farm. He brought the first demijohns to Montgomery County, and sold a great many as curiosities, most of the inhabitants having never seen anything of the kind. Soon after his arrival in Montgomery he went over to Callaway County, one day, to get a load of corn, and wore his usual every-day clothes, made of home-spun cloth. On his way back the road led him by a house where Jabe Ham was preaching, and he stopped to hear the sermon. During the services the minister called on the congregation to kneel in prayer, and all knelt except Mr. Harper, who leaned his head upon his hand, and remained in that position. Ham noticed him, and prayed that the Lord would bless “that Virginia man, who had on...

Biographical Sketch of George Gray

George Gray, of Scotland, emigrated to America previous to the revolution, and when that war began he joined the American army and served during the entire struggle. He had several brothers in the British army during the same war. Before leaving Scotland, he married Mary Stuart, and they settled first in Philadelphia, but afterward removed to North Carolina, and from there to Bryan’s Station in Kentucky. Here their son Joseph married Nary Finley, and settled in Warren County, Kentucky. In 1818 he removed to Missouri, and settled on Brush creek in Montgomery County, where he died in 1830. His children were Hannah, William, Isaac, George, Sarah, Rachel, James, and Mary. Hannah married Asa Williams, who was an early settler of Montgomery County. William, Isaac and George married sisters, named Price, of Kentucky. William had three children, who settled in Missouri after the death of their parents. Isaac and George also settled in Montgomery County, but the latter removed to Clark County in 1837, where he still resides. Sarah married Stephen Finley, who settled in Wisconsin in 1846. Rachel married John P. Glover, who settled in Oregon. James married Margaret Williams, of Ohio. Mary married Presley Anderson, who died in 1848, and who was Sheriff of Montgomery County at the time. He left a widow and five children, who still live in Montgomery...

Biography of David Knox

David Knox was born in Ireland, in 1700. He had a son named Andrew, who was born in 1728. In 1732 Mr. Knox came to America, bringing his little son with him, and settled in Philadelphia County, Pa. Andrew married Isabella White, of Pennsylvania, and they had-Robert, David, Martha, James, John, William, Mary, and Andrew, Jr. Mr. Knox was a soldier in the revolutionary war, and having taken an active part in the events of the day, a reward was offered for him, dead or alive, by the British authorities. On the night of the 14th of February, 1778, he was at home visiting his family, and during the night his house was surrounded by a party of Tories, who had come to capture him for the reward. They announced their presence by firing a volley of balls through the door, and then broke it down with the breeches of their guns. But before they could affect an entrance, Mr. Knox and his son Robert met them with drawn sabers, and laid about them so vigorously that they were soon glad to retreat, with several of their party bleeding from the gashes and cuts they had received. Some American troops in the vicinity were notified of the attack, and immediately started in pursuit. Several of the wounded were captured, as they could be easily traced by the blood on the snow; but the rest made their escape. Those who were captured were tried by court-martial, condemned as spies, and shot. David, son of Andrew Knox, was born in Pennsylvania in 1760. He married Isabella Caldwell, of Charlotte County, Va.,...

Biograhy of Dennis Heartt

If history consists of the lives of great men, whose names are “wrought into the verbs of language, their works and effigies in our houses,” North Carolina should contribute many pages to the epitome of civilization; for her institutions, public and private, have been established by men of superior abilities, who have spared neither time nor resources in the founding of a great State. In journalism, as in economic and political growth, the pioneer work has been done by men of strong personal character, who possessed the art of citizenship as well as the talents requisite for their chosen work. These editors, though the remains of their labor often seem eccentric when compared with our modern journals, had great influence among the people, and their memories are forever perpetuated in the ideals of the State they served so well. Among these pioneers of our press none were purer in public and private life, more energetic, or held greater favor throughout the State than Dennis Heartt, the founder, and for nearly fifty years the editor, of the Hillsborough Recorder. Like many of our best citizens, Mr. Heartt was not a native Carolinian. His father was an English sea captain, who settled in New England. Here, in the village of North Bradford, Connecticut, November 6, 1783, Dennis Heartt was born. Very little is known of the young man’s early life. In 1798 we find him in New Haven, apprenticed to Read and Morse, printers, the latter a brother to the inventor of the electric telegraph. The young compositor soon became very proficient in his work, and was able to set up...

Genealogy of William Allen Family of Philadelphia-pennsylvania

M145 WILLIAM ALLEN: b. in Dungannon, Ireland, and d. in Philadelphia in 1725. He was an eminent merchant in the latter city. Allen m. Mary, dau. of Thomas and Susanne Budd. They had (1) John, James, William, b. Aug. 5, 1704, was Chief Justice of Philadelphia and d. in London, England, in 1780, and Thomas, who d. in Churchtown, N. Y., in 1794. He m. Elizabeth Shadwick. Their ch. include: (A) Thomas: b. 1742 and d. 1755. (B) John B.: d. July 26, 1777. (C) William: b. 1756 and d. Oct. 11, 1833. All of the above lived and died at Taghkanic, N. Y. William m. Jane Shauerman and had John, 1778-1831; Thomas, 1780-1859; William, 1787-1855; Nicholas, 1792-1839; James, 1789-1869; Samuel, 1798-1871; Henry, 1800-1890; Jeremiah, 1805-1896; Elizabeth, 1784-1860, and Peter, b. 1782 and d. 1865. He m. Hannah Covel and had twelve ch., including (a) Henry Lewis: b. Oct. 8, 1819; m. Elizabeth Macy. Their ch. include: 1. John Howard: b. in New Jersey, July 28, 1857. 2. Charles Edward: b. 1863; m. Elizabeth Hallenbeck. One son, Donald, b. 1904. 3. Clifford Henry: b. 1868; m. Helen Rossman, Albany, N. Y. Deceased m., second, Anna Lynn, Toronto, Can. 4. Lewis Warren: b. Nov. 21, 1865; m. Edna Wallace Ewer. One dau., Miriam Elizabeth, b. at Hartford, Conn., 1898, and d....

Biographical Sketch of Luther C. Challis

Perhaps Luther C. Challis, nearly forty years a citizen of Atchison, is best known as a pioneer railroad man. He was born in New Jersey January 26, 1829, and for some years before moving West was engaged in business in Philadelphia and Boonville, Missouri. In 1855 he located in Atchison and joined his brother as one of the first merchants of that town. He afterward became a banker, and maintained a profitable ferry across the Missouri River until the building of the bridge in 1875. Mr. Challis was elected to a seat in the Territorial Council of 1857-58, made vacant by the resignation of Joseph P. Carr in January, 1858. He is generally conceded to be the father of the Central Branch of the Union Pacifie Railroad, having framed the bill to authorize its construction, secured its passage, and negotiated the treaty with the Kickapoo Indians for securing its right-of-way through their territory. Mr. Challis was also one of the incorporators of the Atchison & St. Joseph Railway, the first railroad built in the state, and one of the founders of the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe. He died in Atchison, July 26,...
Page 2 of 1412345678910...Last »

Pin It on Pinterest