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Biographical Sketch of Daniel Pegram

The parents of Daniel Pegram were Scotch. Daniel was born in Petersburg, Va., but settled and lived in Bedford County, where he raised ten children, six sons and four daughters, each of whom was more than six feet in height. Thomas, a son of Daniel Pegram, married Nancy Hopkins, whose mother’s maiden name was Clark, and who had a brother, Chester Clark,, who drew $100,000 in a lottery. Thomas had but three children James L., Edward T., and William. The latter died in Virginia in his 19th year. James L. married Julia R. Oley, of Virginia, and settled in St. Charles County, Mo., in 1839, and in Montgomery County in 1845. Mrs. Pegram died in 1863. They had eight children, four sons and four daughters. Edward T. Pegram married Mildred Crane, of Montgomery County, and had two children, a son and a...

Biography of John Cravens

John Cravens, son of Dr. Joseph and Mary Cravens, was born in Harrisonburg, Rockingham county, Virginia, October 28, 1797, where he was reared and educated. He began the study of medicine under his father,, when in his nineteenth year, and began practice some six years later. After practicing with his father two years, he removed to Hardy county, Virginia now West Virginia, and began practice at Petersburg, but only remained one year, when he removed to Pendleton county, opened an office in Franklin, the county seat, and was an active practitioner in that county for ten years. In 1837 he removed to Missouri, and settled near Miami, where he lived eighteen months, and during that time gave up the practice of his profession. At the expiration of the time mentioned he changed his place of residence to Daviess county, locating near Gallatin in the spring of 1839, where he pursued farming and continued the practice of his profession until 1850, then moved to Gallatin, and gave his attention exclusively to his increasing practice. In 1857 he returned to his farm, one mile northwest of Gallatin, where he now lives. He continued the practice of medicine until the close of the war, when owing to his advanced age and impaired hearing,. he gave up practice entirely, devoting his attention to his farm. In 1842 he was elected presiding justice of the County Court, holding the office until 1846, and subsequently was twice elected to the same office. In 1861 he was appointed brigade-surgeon in the Confederate service under Gen. William Y. Slack, and was with that officer until his death...

Biography of Patrick H. Coney

In many ways the State of Kansas during the last half century had had no more interesting, patriotic, versatile figure than Patrick H. Coney of Topeka. He came to Kansas after making a brilliant record as a soldier in the Civil war. He had been extremely successful as a business man, and his interests as a business man have extended over a wide and diversified field. No man in the country had exhibited a more intense loyalty and devotion to the welfare of the veterans of the great struggle between the North and the South. Mr. Coney is a lawyer, had practiced in Topeka over thirty years, is also a vigorous writer, had been a publisher in his time, and had always made his private success subsidiary to the public welfare. He was born in Newbury, Vermont, March 10, 1848, a son of Luke and Honor Berry Coney. The genealogy of this family is traceable back to Laogare, ancestor of the Southern Hy Nials, a son of Nial of the Nine Hostages, Kings of Ireland in A. D. 379. His father, Luke Coney, was born in County Roscommon, Ireland, and emigrated to the United States in 1839. After living a time in Boston he moved to Vermont, where he married, and in 1850 went to Wayne County, New York. His later life was spent in Topeka, where he died December 16, 1905, in his ninety-fifth year. Patrick H. Coney spent his youth on a farm and his school advantages were seasoned with much hard work. He was patriotic to the core, and after the Civil war broke out his...

Slave Narrative of Kitty Hill

Interviewer: T. Pat Matthews Person Interviewed: Kitty Hill Location: 329 West South Street, Raleigh, North Carolina Age: 76-77 I tole you yisterday dat my age wus 76 years old, but my daughter come home, an’ I axed her’ bout it an’ she say I is 77 years old. I don’t know exactly the date but I wus born in April. I wus a little girl ’bout five years ole when de surrender come, but I don’t’ member anything much’ bout de Yankees. I wus born in Virginia, near Petersburg, an’ mother said de Yankees had been hanging’ round dere so long dat a soldier wus no sight to nobody. ‘Bout de time de Yankees come I’ member hearin’ dem talk ’bout de surrender. Den a Jew man by the name of Isaac Long come to Petersburg, bought us an’ brought us to Chatham County to a little country town, named Pittsboro. Ole man Isaac Long run a store an’ kept a boarding house. We stayed on de lot. My mother cooked. We stayed there a long time atter de war. Father wus sent to Manassas Gap at the beginning of de war and I do not ‘member ever seein’ him. My mother wus named Viney Jefferson an’ my father wus named Thomas Jefferson. We ‘longed to the Jeffersons there and we went by the name of Jefferson when we wus sold and brought to N. C. I do not ‘member my grandparents on my mother’s or father’s side. Mother had one boy an’ three girls. The boy wus named Robert, an’ the girls were Kate, Rosa and Kitty. Marster...

Biography of William Proctor, M. D.

WILLIAM PROCTOR, M. D. (deceased), was a physician who always loved knowledge and as a physician was devoted to his profession, careful in his investigations and gave all the time he could find in his busy life to books and periodicals devoted to medicine and surgery. His range of information was broad, and during the many years he pursued the calling of AEsculapius he won a wide reputation and a large practice. He was born in Petersburg, Virginia, in 1826, and died January 10, 1890, when sixty-four years of age. He was a graduate of William and Mary College, of Virginia, and studied law under his father, Thomas Proctor, who subsequently moved to Tennessee, where the Doctor was his stenographer. During the Mexican war the Doctor joined a Tennessee regiment and fought through the war. He was in the battle of Buena Vista and the City of Mexico, and had command of the flags on the rampart. For bravery he was promoted to the rank of captain on the battlefield at Chepultepec, when seventeen years of age. After the war he went to Warren County, Kentucky; where he studied medicine. Later he went to the University of Pennsylvania, at Philadelphia, and subsequently began practicing in Warren County. When the Civil War broke out he was Government contractor for the Federal Government and furnished a post at Bowling Green with horses and feed for them. He was there all through the war and after-ward engaged in farming and stockraising, and also dealt in tobacco. In the year 1874 he moved to Ripley County, Missouri, located at Doniphan, and at once...

Nahyssan Indians

Nahyssan Tribe: A contraction of Monahassano or Monahassanugh, remembered in later times as Yesan. Nahyssan Connections. The Nahyssan belonged to the Siouan linguistic stock, their nearest relatives being the Tutelo, Saponi, and probably the Monacan and Manahoac. Nahyssan Location. The oldest known location of the Nahyssan has been identified by D. I. Bushnell, Jr. (1930), within very narrow limits as “probably on the left bank of the James, about 1½ miles up the stream from Wingina, in Nelson County.” Nahyssan History. In 1650 Blande and his companions noted a site, 12 miles south-southwest of the present Petersburg, called “Manks Nessoneicks” which was presumably occupied for a time by the Nahyssan or a part of them, since “Manks” may be intended for “Tanks,” the Powhatan adjective signifying “little.” In 1654 or 1656 this tribe and the Manahoac appeared at the falls of James River having perhaps been driven from their former homes by the Susquehanna. They defeated a force of colonials and Powhatan Indians sent against them but did not advance further into the settlements. In 1670 Lederer (1912) found two Indian towns on Staunton River, one of which he calls Sapon and the other Pintahae. Sapon was, of course, the town of the Saponi but it is believed that Pintahae was the town of the Nahyssan Indians, though Lederer gives this name to both towns. Pintahae was probably the Hanathaskie or Hanahaskie town of which Batts and Fallam (1912) speak a year later. About 1675 the Nahyssan settled on an island below the Occaneechi at the junction of the Staunton and Dan Rivers. Before 1701 all of the Siouan...

Biographical Sketch of W. H. Kirkland

W. H. Kirkland, who raised the first American flag in 1856 in the town of Tucson, was born in Petersburg, Virginia, July 12th, 1832, and emigrated to Arizona shortly after the Gadsden Purchase, eight or nine years before the organization of the Territory. He and his wife were the first white couple married in Arizona, being married in Tucson May 26th, 1860. In 1863 and 1864, he spent a good deal of time around Walnut Grove mining and ranching, about which time he purchased the ranch located by Pauline Weaver, and there engaged in stock raising. Later he settled in the Salt River Valley, where Mrs. Wayne Ritter, his daughter, was born in Phoenix on August 15th, 1871. She was born in the second house which was built in the city of Phoenix. Kirkland died in Winkleman, Arizona, January 19th, 1911, at the age of 78 years, and was survived by a wife and seven...

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