Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

Slave Narrative of Lucy Brown

Interviewer: Mary A. Hicks Person Interviewed: Lucy Brown Date of Interview: May 20, 1937 Location: Durham, North Carolina An interview with Lucy Brown of Hecktown, Durham, Durham County, May 20, 1937. She does not know her age. I wuz jist a little thing when de war wuz over an’ I doan ‘member much ter tell yo’. Mostly what I does know I hyard my mammy tell it. We belonged to John Neal of Person County. I doan know who my pappy wuz, but my mammy wuz named Rosseta an’ her mammy’s name ‘fore her wuz Rosseta. I had one sister named Jenny an’ one brother named Ben. De marster wuz good ter us, in a way, but he ain’t ‘lowin’ no kinds of frolickin’ so when we had a meetin’ we had ter do it secret. We’d turn down a wash pot outside de do’, an’ dat would ketch de fuss so marster neber knowed nothin’ ’bout hit. On Sundays we went ter church at de same place de white folkses did. De white folkses rid an’ de niggers walked, but eben do’ we wored wooden bottomed shoes we wuz proud an’ mostly happy. We had good clothes an’ food an’ not much abuse. I doan know de number of slaves, I wuz so little. My mammy said dat slavery wuz a whole lot wuser [HW correction: wusser] ‘fore I could ‘member. She tol’ me how some of de slaves had dere babies in de fiel’s lak de cows done, an’ she said dat ‘fore de babies wuz borned dey tied de mammy down on her face if’en dey...

Slave Narrative of Robert Glenn

Interviewer: T. Pat. Matthews Person Interviewed: Robert Glenn Location: 207 Idlewild Avenue, Raleigh, North Carolina Date of Birth: Sept. 16, 1850 Location of Birth: Orange County NC Age: 87 I was a slave before and during the Civil War. I am 87 years old. I was born Sept. 16, 1850. I was born in Orange County, North Carolina near Hillsboro. At that time Durham was just a platform at the station and no house there whatever. The platform was lighted with a contraption shaped like a basket and burning coal that gave off a blaze. There were holes in this metal basket for the cinders to fall through. I belonged to a man named Bob Hall, he was a widower. He had three sons, Thomas, Nelson, and Lambert. He died when I was eight years old and I was put on the block and sold in Nelson Hall’s yard by the son of Bob Hall. I saw my brother and sister sold on this same plantation. My mother belonged to the Halls, and father belonged to the Glenns. They sold me away from my father and mother and I was carried to the state of Kentucky. I was bought by a Negro speculator by the name of Henry Long who lived not far from Hurdles Mill in Person County. I was not allowed to tell my mother and father goodbye. I was bought and sold three times in one day. My father’s time was hired out and as he knew a trade he had by working overtime saved up a considerable amount of money. After the speculator, Henry Long,...

Slave Narrative of Analiza Foster

Interviewer: Mary A. Hicks Person Interviewed: Analiza Foster Location: 1120 Sound Blount Street, Raleigh, North Carolina Location of Birth: Person County NC Age: 68 An interview with Analiza Foster, 68 of 1120 South Blount Street, Raleigh, North Carolina. I wuz borned in Person County ter Tom Line an’ Harriet Cash. My mammy belonged ter a Mr. Cash an’ pappy belonged ter Miss Betsy Woods. Both of dese owners wuz mean ter dere slaves an’ dey ain’t carin’ much if’en dey kills one, case dey’s got plenty. Dar wuz one woman dat I hyard mammy tell of bein’ beat clean ter death. De ‘oman wuz pregnant an’ she fainted in de fiel’ at de plow. De driver said dat she wuz puttin’ on, an’ dat she ort ter be beat. De master said dat she can be beat but don’t ter hurt de baby. De driver says dat he won’t, den he digs a hole in de sand an’ he puts de ‘oman in de hole, which am nigh ’bout ter her arm pits, den he kivers her up an’ straps her han’s over her haid. He takes de long bull whup an’ he cuts long gashes all over her shoulders an’ raised arms, den he walks off an’ leabes her dar fer a hour in de hot sun. De flies an’ de gnats dey worry her, an’ de sun hurts too an’ she cries a little, den de driver comes out wid a pan full of vinegar, salt an’ red pepper an’ he washes de gashes. De ‘oman faints an’ he digs her up, but in a few minutes...

Saponi Indians

Saponi Tribe: Evidently a corruption of Monasiccapano or Monasukapanough, which, as shown by Bushnell, is probably derived in part from a native term “moni seep” signifying “shallow water.” Paanese is a corruption and in no way connected with the word “Pawnee.” Saponi Connections. The Saponi belonged to the Siouan linguistic family, their nearest relations being the Tutelo. Saponi Location. The earliest known location of the Saponi has been identified by Bushnell (1930) with high probability with “an extensive village site on the banks of the Rivanna, in Albemarle County, directly north of the University of Virginia and about one-half mile up the river from the bridge of the Southern Railway.” This was their location when, if ever, they formed a part of the Monacan Confederacy. (See also North Carolina, New York, and Pennsylvania.) Saponi Villages. The principal Saponi settlement usually bore the same name as the tribe or, at least, it has survived to us under that name. In 1670 Lederer reports another which he visited called Pintahae, situated not far from the main Saponi town after it had been removed to Otter Creek, southwest of the present Lynchburg (Lederer, 1912), but this was probably the Nahyssan town. Saponi History As first pointed out by Mooney (1895), the Saponi tribe is identical with the Monasukapanough which appears on Smith’s map as though it were a town of the Monacan and may in fact have been such. Before 1670, and probably between 1650 and 1660, they moved to the southwest and probably settled on Otter Creek, as above indicated. In 1670 they were visited by Lederer in their new home...

W. H. Malone

Corpl., General Service, Inf. Born in Person County; the son of Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Malone. Husband of Mrs. Vera Malone. Entered the service May 10, 1917, at Winston-Salem, N.C. Was sent to Ft. Thomas and transferred from there to Greensboro, N.C., and Transferred to Fort Thomas. Was on recruiting duty for three months in Bureau War Work Insurance at Fort Thomas, Ky., Dec. 18,...

Person County, North Carolina Cemetery Transcriptions

North Carolina Cemetery records are listed by county then name of cemetery within the North Carolina county. Most of these are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we list the listing when it is only a partial listing. Following Cemeteries (hosted at Person County, North Carolina USGenWeb Archives) David Allen Cemetery Arbert Blalock Cemetery Green W. Blalock Cemetery Sam Blalock Cemetery Blalock-Garrett Cemetery Bumpass Cemetery Burch-Clayton Cemetery Burchwood Cemetery Carver-Oakley-Clayton Cemetery Chambers Family Cemetery Chandler-Duncan Cemetery Sol Daniel Clayton Cemetery Mooney-Blalock Cemetery John Moore Cemetery Moore Family Cemetery #1 Moore Family Cemetery #2 Azariah Oakley Family Cemetery John B. Oakley Family Cemetery Luther G. Oakley Family Cemetery Old Barnett Blalock Cemetery Old Blalock Cemetery Old Snipes Cemetery William Billy Pearce Family Cemetery Soggins Family Cemetery Jesse Walker Family Cemetery Wheeley Davies Cemetery Wilkerson Cemetery...

Pin It on Pinterest