Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

Swinger, Polly Mrs. – Obituary

Mrs. Polly Swiger, aged 81 years and 26 days, died at the Swiger residence near Union, Oregon, Sunday, October 9, 1910, and was buried from the Presbyterian church Wednesday, October 12, at 11 a.m. Polly Wilkinson was born in Jackson county, Ohio, September 29, 1829, and her early life was passed in the vicinity of Peoria, Ill. She was married to N. Swiger in 1851, and in 1858 moved from Illinois to Nebraska. In May, 1864, Mr. and Mrs. Swiger moved to Oregon, arriving in the Grande Ronde Valley, October 9, of that year. From June 1865, to October 1869 they lived in the Williamette valley, after which they moved to the Grande Ronde Valley and have lived here since, spending the time from 1869 to 1889 in High Valley, and since that time at the Swiger home near Union. Seven children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Swiger, four of whom are living, namely: William, of Union; Mrs. Viola Cochran, of Washington; Nora Rumbley, of Pine Valley, and Elmer Swiger, of Union. Four brothers and one sister survive Mrs. Swiger. “Death of Mrs. Polly Swiger” Obituaries and Other Vital Records of Union County, Oregon. 1890 – 1930. Compiled by Clara Cline Lee. Reproduced by Walter M. Pierce Library, Eastern Oregon Library, 1972. “Funeral Notice”     Mrs. Polly Swiger, age 81 years and 26 days, died at the family residence near Union, Oregon, Sunday October 9, 1910, at 5 o’clock p.m. The funeral will take place from the Presbyterian Church, Wednesday, October 12, at 11 o’clock a.m. Friends are invited to attend. Obituaries and Other Vital Records of Union County,...

Swiger, Polly Mrs. – Obituary

Union, Union County, Oregon Mrs. Polly Swiger, aged 81 years and 26 days, died at the Swiger residence near Union, Oregon, Sunday, October 9, 1910, and was buried from the Presbyterian church Wednesday, October 12, at 11 a. m. Polly Wilkinson was born in Jackson county, Ohio, September 29, 1829, and her early life was passed in the vicinity of Peoria, Ill. She was married to N. Swiger in 1851, and in 1858 moved from Illinois to Nebraska. In May, 1864, Mr. and Mrs. Swiger moved to Oregon, arriving in the Grande Ronde Valley, October 9, of that year. From June 1865, to October 1869 they lived in the Williamette valley, after which they moved to the Grande Ronde Valley and have lived here since, spending the time from 1869 to 1889 in High Valley, and since that time at the Swiger home near Union. Seven children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Swiger, four of whom are living, namely: William, of Union; Mrs. Viola Cochran, of Washington; Nora Rumbley, of Pine Valley, and Elmer Swiger, of Union. Four brothers and one sister survive Mrs. Swiger. Contributed by: Larry...

Wicks, H. Mrs. – Obituary

Mrs. H. Wicks Passed This Life Sunday Noon Another pioneer was called to the beyond this week when Mrs. H. Wicks died at her ranch home east of North Powder, Sunday morning, June 21. Mrs. Wicks had been in ill health for the past two years, and for the past several months, had been bedfast, and while her death was not unexpected, yet it cast a gloom over the entire community. She will be missed by her many friends and acquaintances, many of whom had known her for the 43 years she has spent in this section. Mrs. Wicks was born in Ireland and had she lived until the 15th of August would have been 86 years of age. She came to this country when four years old. She was married to Harrison Wicks in Peoria, Illinois, and they together with their family crossed the plains, and came directly to North Powder, where with the exception of a short stay in the Willamette valley, they have since resided. Mr. Wicks died about four years ago, and since that time Mrs. Wicks began to fail, sadly missing her companion of many years. Five children survive their mother. They are James E. and Clarence Wicks of North Powder, Mrs. Mary Nice and Mrs. Katie Carnes of this city, and Mrs. Belle Daugherty of Junction City. Funeral services were held from the local Methodist church Wednesday afternoon. A large crowd attended to pay their respects to their old friend, and many floral offerings were in evidence as a mute testimony of their affection. Interment was in the North Powder cemetery. North Powder...

Wilkinson, John – Obituary

Forty-two years a resident of Union county, Oregon, was John Wilkinson, who was born July 30, 1839, in Peoria, Illinois, and died in Walla Walla, Washington, where he went three weeks before for treatment in a hospital in that city. At the age of two years, he, with his parents, went to Missouri, where they remained eight years, then to the old Illinois home till 1858, when he started westward, spending four years with headquarters in Nebraska, freighting on the plains as far as Denver. In 1864, he, together with his father, mother, five brothers and three sisters and a large number of others, with a “prairie schooner” train, being himself chosen the captain, crossed the Rockies and on into the then wild Oregon, settling in High Valley, a few miles from this city, which has been his home until his death. He was married at Cove in 1873, to Sarah Vansel. To them were born four children-Joseph E. Wilkinson and Mrs. William Haggerty, who remain to mourn the loss of their honored father, Charles H. , who died ten years ago, and the beautiful and loved Grace E., who died June 10 of the present year. Others remaining are the wife and one step-daughter, Mrs. Chas. Fleetwood, of Hereford, five brothers and two sisters, but one sister of this family having preceded him to the long home. Mr. Wilkinson was one of the most widely known, as well as the most respected pioneers of Eastern Oregon. His friends were true and constant, for he tried every day and every hour to do by them as he would be...

O’Farrell, James R. – Obituary

James R. O’Farrell, 80, a native of Orting and a former Pierce County commissioner, died Friday night [September 25, 1953] at his home in Orting. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Robert O’Farrell, were pioneers in area, taking up a 120-acre homestead in the Puyallup Valley in 1870. Mr. O’Farrell was the last of four sons of the pioneers. He married Lena Bruce of Tacoma in 1898 and they set up housekeeping in Orting. For many years he was active in community and political affairs. He served at various times as mayor, councilman and school director in Orting and from 1916 to 1922 was a county commissioner. From 1924 to 1940 he served as manager of the Bureau of Credit and Collections for the Caterpillar Tractor Co. in Peoria, Ill. In 1940 he became assistant secretary for the Caterpillar Military Engine Co. in Decatur, Ill. He spent the latter years of the war with the War Production Board in Washington, D. C. In 1946 Mr. O’Farrell returned to Orting to take up active management of the Orting Funeral Home, which he had owned for more than 50 years. Since his retirement in 1949 he has spent much time traveling about the country. Survivors include his wife, Lena; two daughters, Mrs. Ruth E. Fair of Denver and Mrs. Edna Mendonca of Richmond, Calif.; a son, Norman of Bellevue and three grandchildren. Services will be held Tuesday at 2 p.m. in the Orting Methodist Episcopal Church with the Rev. J. L. Woodford officiating. The Masonic Lodge will conduct graveside rites at the Orting Cemetery, where the Orting Funeral Home will be in...

Street, Victoria Hewitt – Obituary

Mrs. Leslie Street passed away at her home in Sturgis Saturday evening [April 20, 1965]. Jesse [Victoria] Hewitt Street was born in Streeter, Ill., March 16, 1878, where she grew to womanhood and was married at Peoria, Ill., in 1899 to Leslie Street. They came to South Dakota in 1911, settling near Faith where they lived until 1945 when they moved to Sturgis. Mrs. Street passed away here in 1949. She is survived by one son, Harry of Rapid City; two daughters, Mrs. May Fuller of Rapid City and Mrs. Evelyn Marshall of Clayton, Idaho; one sister, Mrs. Alice Yeast of Seattle, Wash. and six grandchildren and 15 great grandchildren. Four brothers and four sisters preceded her in death. Funeral services were held Tuesday from the F. O. Jolley Funeral Home with Rev. Donald Gover officiating. Special music was provided by Mrs. Elaine Owens and George Minier. Pallbearers were Merle Miller, John Detjen, Les Babcock, Dan Regan, George Alt, and Kelly Donaldson. Interment was in the Bear Butte Cemetery. Sturgis Tribune, April 21, 1965 Contributed by: Shelli...

Biography of Fred Eugene Pettit

Fred Eugene Pettit is a veteran business man and merchant of Marion County, and until he retired a few years ago conducted one of the largest stores at Peabody. Mr. Pettit was reared and educated and gained his first mercantile experience in the State of Illinois. He was born at Wyoming in Stark County, Illinois, January 8, 1861, a son of Peter and Mary Anne (Bailey) Pettit. Peter Pettit was born in New York State and located in Illinois in 1851, when the country was new and undeveloped. After a few years he lost his health and suffered invalidism throughout the latter part of his life. He died at the comparatively early age of forty-six years. Mary Anne (Bailey) Pettit was born in Devonshire, England, in 1830. When she was six years of age she came with her father to America. The Baileys first located at Oswego, New York, moved from there to Wisconsin for three years, and then returned to New York State and located near Syracuse. It was at Syracuse that Mary Bailey married Peter Pettit in 1851. After their marriage they moved to Wyoming, Illinois, and she continued to make her home in that state for many years, but finally came to Peabody, Kansas, where she died in September, 1911. Peter Pettit and wife had four children: Edgar A., deceased; Maggie May, Mrs. J. D. Smith, of Peabody; Fred Eugene; and George T., deceased. His father being an invalid, Fred Eugene Pettit had an early realization of the responsibilities of life and found it necessary to make his own living when the average boy is attending...

Peoria Tribe

Peoria Indians (through French Peouarea, from Peoria Piwarea, ‘he comes carrying a pack on his back’: a personal name. Gerard). One of the principal tribes of the Illinois confederacy. Franquelin in his map of 1688 locates them and the Tapouaro on a river west of the Mississippi above the mouth of Wisconsin River, probably the upper Iowa River. Early references to the Illinois which place them on the Mississippi, although some of the tribes were on Rock and Illinois rivers, must relate to the Peoria and locate them near the mouth of the Wisconsin. When Marquette and Joliet descended the Mississippi in 1673, they found them and the Moingwena on the west side of the Mississippi near the mouth of a river supposed to be the Des Moines, though it may have been one farther north. When Marquette returned from the south, he found that the Peoria had removed and were near the lower end of the expansion of Illinois river, near the present Peoria. At the close of the war carried on by the Sauk and Foxes and other northern tribes against the Illinois, about 1768, the Kickapoo took possession of this village and made it their principal settlement. About the same time a large part of the Peoria crossed over into Missouri, where they remained, building their village on Blackwater fork, until they removed to Kansas. One band, the Utagami, living near Illinois river, was practically exterminated, probably by the northern tribes, during the Revolutionary War1 Utagami, according to Dr Wm. Jones, may mean the Foxes who were known to the northern Algonquians as Utugamig, ‘people of...

Biography of Hon. Samuel S. Guyer

The Honorable Samuel S. Guyer was born at Lewistown, Pennsylvania, December 26, 1814. In his early manhood he was a contractor in New York City and in the construction of the Pennsylvania Canal System. In 1839, with his mother, sister and two brothers, he removed to Peoria, Illinois, from which base he engaged in the business of building flat boats and carrying cargos of merchandise to trade with the planters between Natchez and New Orleans. In the great tornado at Natchez in 1842, he lost all his possessions and barely escaped with his life. Returning to Peoria he studied law and qualified for the bar in the office of Mr. Knowlton, father of our former townsman, William S. Knowlton. In 1843 he came to Rock Island to practice his profession. He was appointed by the Court to defend the Redings, indicted for complicity in the murder of George Davenport, and he succeeded in securing their acquittal. In 1847 he was elected Sheriff of Rock Island County, which office he held for two terms. He was one of the incorporators of the Coal Valley Mining Company, and of the Rock Island and Peoria Railway Company, which road, then built only as far as Coal Valley, was under his management until 1861 when he sold his interests to the late P. L. Cable. In this enterprise he had been associated with Charles Buford, Holmes Hakes, N. B. Buford and Ben Harper. He secured the charter for the Chippiannock Cemetery Association, of which he was a director until his death. After disposing of his mining and railroad interests he became a member...

Biographical Sketch of Henry E. Brown

Mr. Henry E. Brown was born and uneducated in Elmwood, Peoria County, Illinois, until his sixteenth year when he moved to Peoria and entered the high school, afterwards entering Grinnell College in Grinnell, Iowa, from which he graduated in 1899, with the degree of Bachelor of Physics. Since then he has been connected with the Rock Island Public Schools, starting as a teacher and five years ago becoming principal of the high school. Mr. Brown has always been greatly interested in all educational matters and has received much recognition for his interest by educational associations. He is at the present time president of the Western Section of the Northern Illinois Teachers’ Association. He is also author of a text book which has had a very wide sale among the schools of the country. Mr. Brown is at present thirty-five years old, and was married in 1906 to Miss Bertha...
Page 2 of 41234

Pin It on Pinterest