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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. C. E. Woodward

(See Ross and Holland).-Florence Ella, daughter of Daniel L. and Ruth Caroline (Holland) Ross was born November 30, 1879. Educated in the Cherokee Public Schools, Female Seminary and North Eastern State Normal. Married at Parsons, Kansas, February 6, 1910, Charles Earl, son of John W. and Nancy E. Woodward, born July 15, 1880 in Dent County, Missouri. Educated in Salem High School and Draughon’s Business College. Mr. Woodward taught school four years before their marriage and Mrs. Woodward taught ten years. Re was postmaster at Vera under President Wilson....

Slave Narrative of Jim Threat

Person Interviewed: Jim Threat Place of Birth: Talidiga County, Alabama Date of Birth: September 1851 We all sung dat song and had a lot of fun singing it but it was true jest the same. Dat was one of the things dat the niggers dreaded most, was a patteroller. Slaves would have a little party all the niggers would gather at one of the cabins and lock the door so the patterollers couldn’t git in. When the party was over and they started home the patterollers would stop them and demand their passes. Woe to the nigger that didn’t have one! I guess they was all right in some cases but they over-done it I can tell you. I recollects that down in the neighborhood jest below us we was all the time hearing about the patterollers beating some nigger. Finally the slaves got tired of it and decided to do something about it. One night they got some grape vines and twisted them together and stretched them across the road. They went down the road and waited and finally four or five patterollers come along. The nigger boys started running back up the road and by this time the Patterollers was running their horses full speed after them. Just before they got to the vines the niggers ducked out of the road and the horses run full tilt into the vines. You never saw such a spill. The horses turned “summer-sets” and one man was killed, two had their legs broke and one got a arm broke. Course these boss had to take to de woods and finally...

Biography of Charles Sumner Newlon, M.D.

Dr. Charles Sumner Newlon, who for the past fifteen years has engaged in the practice of medicine and surgery in Kansas City, Missouri, and who for many years prior to this period was a physician and surgeon of the state of Kansas, was born at Newton’s Grove, Cass county, Iowa, in 1858, a son of Dr. William Smithson and Maria (Wimp) Newlon. The ancestral line is traced back to his great-grandfather, John Newlon. The grandfather, Hiram Newlon, was born in Virginia and was a cousin of Dolly Madison, wife of the fourth president of the United States and also a relative of Mrs. Patrick Henry. The wife of Hiram Newlon was Margaret Field, of Kentucky, a cousin of Governor Shortridge, of Alabama, also of Wade Hampton and of Judge Field, of Louisiana. Dr. W. S. Newton, father of Dr. Charles S. Newlon, was also a prominent physician of the west. He collected the indigenous plants of southern Kansas for the Centennial Exposition and made many geological surveys in Kansas, Oklahoma and Missouri, contributing valuable collections to Washburn College and the Smithsonian Institute. In 1882 he investigated and wrote articles upon the screw fly. About this time he contended through the medical press that consumption and some ten or twelve other diseases were caused by germs. He discovered five or six fossil cephalopods, a crawfish and several insects new to science. He also discovered a number of medicinal plants and introduced them into the practice of medicine, some of these being eliphantopes, sabbatia, grindelia, hellanthus, etc., and for many years he published the Golden Rod, a scientific paper. Dr. Charles...

Biographical Sketch of Albert Lehman Southworth

Albert Lehman Southworth, living retired at Longview, represents one of the old and substantial families of Champaign County, his people having located here more than sixty years ago and having played worthy and active parts in the development and transformation of Raymond Township. Mr. Southworth was born in Erie County, Ohio, August 14, 1850, son of John Randolph and Anna (Akers) Southworth. His father was a Connecticut man by birth while his mother was born in Bucks County, Pennsylvania. It was in 1855 that the family came to Champaign County and settled on a tract of raw and unimproved land in section 29, Raymond Township. The father lived there and cultivated the soil until his death in 1885, while the mother passed away in 1893. They were the parents of six children: Mary Adelaide, widow of Martin B. Reed, living in Colorado; Julia Ann, deceased; Horace Franklin, deceased; Albert L.; John J., of Danville, Illinois; and May Lilly, wife of James Watts, of Fairland. Albert L. Southworth has had an active career, was reared on the home farm in Raymond Township, attended the local schools, and at the age of twenty-three left home and went to Parsons, Kansas, where he lived on a farm for seven years. His next experience was near Soda Springs, Colorado, where he spent three years as a miner. On returning to Champaign County he rented the home place for about three years, and again went back to Kansas and did farming for seven years. Since then he has lived at Longview and is retired. Mr. Southworth is a Democrat in...

Biography of George W. Gabriel, M. D.

George W. Gabriel, M. D., of Parsons had his first medical experience as a hospital steward and soldier during the Civil war. He is now the oldest active medical man in the state, having practiced continuously for over forty-five years. Doctor Gabriel is one of the pioneer physicians of Parsons, and has identified himself with that community not only in a professional capacity but also as a public spirited man of affairs. He is a former state senator. He was born in that old center of education and culture of the Ohio Valley, Athens, Ohio, on November 17, 1841. The Gabriels were French Alsatians, but settled in Pennsylvania during the colonial days. His great-grandfather Abraham Gabriel was a Pennsylvania soldier in the Revolution, and thus Doctor Gabriel is eligible to membership in the Sons of the American Revolution. His grandfather Elias Gabriel was born in Pennsylvania in 1786, and as a young man went to Southeastern Ohio and settled at Athens. He saw active service in the War of 1812 and thus the Gabriel family has been represented in every important war of this country beginning with the establishment of the independence of the United States. Elias Gabriel was a stone mason and farmer and died at Athens, Ohio, in 1864. He married Susan Bane, who was born in Pennsylvania and died at Athens. Moses Gabriel, father of Doctor Gabriel, was born at Athens, Ohio, in 1814, and spent his life as a farmer and stock raiser in that section. He died there in 1879. He was a consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and politically was a...

Biography of Joseph L. Strickler

Joseph L. Strickler. In reviewing the lives of the business men of Cherryvale, especially in regard to the establishment and growth of the oil industry, it who have taken part in this work have been those who have brought with them from other parts of the state and country reputations for honorable dealing, and capability for accomplishment of purpose. Associated with the oil industry of this part of the state is the name of Joseph L. Strickler, who came to Cherryvale in 1902 and is now probably the largest independent producer in this locality. Mr. Strickler has been identified with the oil business practically since he started upon his career and has had experience in various fields. He was born in Fairfield County, Ohio, December 19, 1872, and is a son of William Baker and Mary (Foutz) Strickler. The Strickler family is of German origin and was founded in America previous to the Revolution, the American progenitor settling in the colony of Virginia. John Strickler, the grandfather of Joseph L., was born in 1808, in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia and was a marble cutter by trade, but on going as a pioneer to Fairfield County, Ohio, took up farming as his vocation and homesteaded 160 acres. He also built the old half-way house between Lancaster and Pleasantville, which he conducted for many years, and there continued to reside during the remainder of his life. He was equally successful at his trade, as the proprietor of his tavern and as a farmer, and was a man of some influence in his community, and rounded out a full and useful...

Biography of Thomas E. Donnellan

Thomas E. Donnellan of Parsons has the active supervision of all Southeastern Kansas, Eastern Oklahoma and Southwest Missouri for the International Harvester Company. He has been general agent for that great corporation for the past fifteen years. Mr. Donnellan is a Kansas man, is a birthright farmer and knows the practical side of farming, an experience which has proved valuable to him as representing a great agricultural house. His family on both sides came to Kansas in territorial days. His father, John Donnellan, who was born in County Clare, Ireland, in 1824, came to this country at the age of twenty years, and for several years was employed in the lumber camps of New York State. It was in March, 1856, that he came to Kansas. Kansas was then a territory and the scene of the great struggle which earned for the territory the name “Bleeding Kansas.” His first location was in Miami County, where he secured 160 acres of an old Indian reservation and for two years was engaged in cultivating it. The activities of the Bushwhackers drove him away from that land, and he then moved to Atchison County. Subsequently he sold the quarter section in Miami County and in Atchison County he bought a farm of 160 acres a half mile west of Lancaster. Thereafter he was one of the leading farmers and citizens of Atchison County until his death in 1894. John Donnellan was a republican, and was one of the first justices of the peace in Atchison County and for many years served on the school board. For twelve years he was township treasurer...

Biography of Frank Marion Hare

Frank Marion Hare is city engineer of Parsons. He is a competent and thoroughly versed man in his profession, and he trained himself for that career. His Harr ancestors came from Germany and settled in New York State in colonial times. His paternal grandfather, John M. Harr, was born in Ohio in 1820, spent his life as a farmer and died in Van Wert County of the Buckeye State in 1897. He was an active republican in politics. Of his children four are now deceased, and those still living, the uncles and aunts of Frank M. Harr, are: Corwin, a farmer in Van Wert County, Ohio; Demie, wife of Ben Britson, a retired farmer of Van Wert County; Abe, who lives retired in Woodward County, Oklahoma; Ad, a carpenter in Van Wert, Ohio; John M., engaged in the furniture business at Springfield, Missouri; Mary, wife of E. H. Snyder, a clothing merchant at Convoy, Ohio; Emma, wife of Burt Stewart, a retired farmer in Van Wert County; and P. A., a hardware merchant at Aurora, Missouri. U. S. Harr, father of the Parsons city engineer, was born in Van Wert County, Ohio, November 13, 1856, and died at Parsons, December 11, 1913. His early life was spent in Van Wert County, and in 1880 he moved to Parsons and was married there. He was for thirty-three years in the employ of the Missouri, Kansas & Texas Railway as bridge and building foreman: An active republican, he was also a prominent fraternal man and was affiliated with Parsons Lodge, No. 117, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, Parsons Chapter, No. 39,...

Biography of Sheridan M. Dick

Sheridan M. Dick. By choosing a line of activity and sticking to it closely for many years Sheridan M. Dick has attained an enviable position in business affairs. He is now foreman of the Baldwin Shirt Factory at Parsons. This industry is probably the largest of its kind in the State of Kansas. Mr. Dick was born in Indiana County, Pennsylvania, May 10, 1866. He is of Irish descent, his Grandfather William Dick having been born in Ireland and having come to the United States when a young man. He spent his life as a farmer in Indiana County, Pennsylvania, where he died in 1870. The father of S. M. Dick was John W. Dick, who was born in 1819, also in Indiana County, Pennsylvania. He lived there the life of a farmer, and though quite an old man at the time and past military age he gave three years of faithful service to the Union army during the Civil war. In 1884 he moved out to Kansas, farmed in Douglas County near Lawrence, and was still a resident there when his death occurred. He died in Indiana County, Pennsylvania, in 1907 while on a visit to the scenes of his birthplace. He was an old school republican and a member of the Presbyterian Church. John W. Dick married Isabelle Sleppy, who was born March 4, 1833, in Indiana County, Pennsylvania, and died at lawrence, Kansas, in 1905. Their children are: Isaac, a rancher at Tulare, California; James N., who was for many years with the Pennsylvania Railroad Company and died at Johnstown, Pennsylvania, in 1912; Abram, a granite...

Biography of William Wallace Brown

William Wallace Brown, general attorney at Parsons for the Missouri, Kansas & Texas Railway and a director in that railway company, is one of Kansas’ prominent lawyers with many well earned distinctions in the profession. The secret of his success has been hard work. He began practice only after a thorough preliminary training of self reliance and after getting his professional education through his own earnings and efforts. A native of Kansas, he represents a pioneer family. Mr. Brown was born in Coffey County July 29, 1868. He is of English ancestry. His grandfather Robert Brown was born in England, brought his family to America in 1845, and became a contractor and builder in the State of Iowa. While still at work in his business he was struck by a beam and that caused his death about 1857. He died in Iowa. Charles Brown, father of W. W. Brown, was born at Beverly, Yorkshire, England, November 14, 1832. He was thirteen years of age when he came to America and he grew up at Maquoketa, Iowa. After finishing his education he became a farmer. In 1857 at the age of twenty-five he moved from Maquoketa, Iowa, to Kansas, and was one of the early settlers in the territory. His permanent home was on a farm along the line between Anderson and Coffey counties. A few years after coming to Kansas he enlisted in the Tenth Kansas Regiment of Infantry, and was in active service during the war, principally in Missouri, Arkansas and Indian Territory. He was in the battle of Prairie Grove, Arkansas, and served with the Kansas troops...
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