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Biography of Sidney Walter Moss

SIDNEY WALTER MOSS. – Mr. Moss is a venerable and noticeable character among the pioneers, not only for his long residence in Oregon, but for the esteem in which he has ever been held by the people. He has, in an eminent degree, that quality for which the early Oregonians have been remarkable, – liberality. He was born in Paris, Kentucky, March 17,1810. His father, Moses Moss, was a Baptist minister; and his mother, Katherine Buckford Moss, was a woman of great force and elevation of character. The young man learned the trade of stone-cutting, and in 1828 left Kentucky for Ohio. He found an abundance of work in the Buckeye state, but in 1837 went on to Indiana, working at Madison and on the Madison & Indianapolis Railway. At the state capital he erected two bank buildings. In 1839 he was back in Kentucky working on lock three on the Licking river canal. In 1841 he was at Fort Smith in full charge of the stone-cutting department in work then under construction. But a desire for the wild West there overtook him; and he joined the company of Doctor White for Oregon. That was the first genuine immigration; and the particulars are given elsewhere. At Waiilatpu Mr. Moss met Doctor Whitman, and remembers his inquiries about the Ashburton treaty, and in what shape Oregon would be left, and believes that the Doctor’s trip undertaken the October following with A.L. Lovejoy was for political reasons. Reaching Oregon City, our skilled stone-cutter found the country a wilderness; and there was no work to do except chopping wood. The remuneration for...

Biography of Deacon John A. Boyer

A man remembered only by the older generation of Rock Island County’s citizens was Deacon John A Boyer, deceased. He was born at Bedford, Pennsylvania, October 16, 1809. During a portion of his boyhood his parents lived at Paris, Kentucky, and later removed to Indiana. In 1837 he came to this county and settled in what was then the town of Stephenson. In 1838 Mr. Boyer was united in marriage to Mrs. Zeruiah Phillips, whose maiden name was Zeruiah Robbins. The following year Mr. and Mrs. Boyer moved to the farm at the south end of what is now Thirtieth Street, which was their home at the time of Mrs. Boyer’s death, which occurred March 16, 1886, closing a long and happy married life of forty-eight years. No children blessed this marriage, but after some years of married life they took Thomas Campbell into the family and reared him to manhood. He and his family were beneficiaries from the estates. Mr. Campbell lived forty years of Mr. Boyer’s life with him and was as son to the family in every sense of the word. In religious faith Mr. Boyer and his devoted wife were Baptists, and their fidelity to the cause of their church and zeal in the cause of religion are demonstrated by the following minutes taken from the records of the Baptist Church of this city, under date of March 20, 1843: “Church called a session which lasted several days. Brethren from this church and our sister church in Davenport sat as a church and received the following persons-.” (Then follows the names of three received by...

Biography of Col. Thomas A. Marshall

Col. Thomas A. Marshall, deceased, late of Charleston; was a son of Hon. Thos A. Marshall, a prominent lawyer, and for more than twenty years Judge of the Court of Appeals of Kentucky; he was born in Frankfort, Ky., Nov. 4, 1817; in early childhood, he removed with his parents to Paris, Bourbon Co., Ky.; his opportunities for obtaining an education were excellent and were appreciated and improved by him; he early became a student in Transylvania University, and, in about 1833, entered Kenyon College, but near the close of the Junior year, he left College, and was employed for a few months on the survey of the Louisville & Lexington Railroad; after reading law and attending a course of lectures in the law department of Transylvania University, in Lexington, Ky., his father being then a law professor in that institution, he was admitted to the bar, and, in 1837, began practice in Vicksburg, Miss., where he enjoyed a very successful law practice until his removal to Illinois. He was married Sept. 4. 1838, to Miss Ellen I. Miles, daughter of Dr. James I. Miles, of Frankfort, Ky.; in November, 1839, he removed to Coles Co., where he bad previously purchased a tract of 800 acres of land, known as Dead Man’s Grove; he removed to Charleston two years afterward and resumed the practice of his profession; turning his attention to politics, he became a leading politician, and was associated with Abraham Lincoln, Lyman Trumbull, David Davis, John M. Palmer, N. B. Judd and others in the organization of the Republican party in 1856, previously to which time he...

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