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Biography of Charles A. Leavy, M. D.

Dr. Charles A. Leavy, who in the practice of medicine is specializing on diseases of the ear, nose and throat in St. Louis, was born in Palmyra, Missouri, September 25, 1873. His father, the late James Leavy, was a native of St. Louis, where his father, who was of Irish descent, settled at a very early day. James Leavy was a sculptor who won professional prominence and he was also a Civil war veteran who served with the rank of corporal in Company G, Thirtieth Missouri Volunteer Infantry for three and a half years, being wounded in the battle of Vicksburg. He died in Louisiana, Missouri, in 1911, when at the age of sixty-three years. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Mary Saunders, was a native of Palmyra, Missouri, and died in 1880 at the age of thirty-eight years. In the family were three children, two of whom were daughters. Dr. Leavy, the second in order of birth, acquired a district school education in Ralls county and then attended the high school at New London, Missouri, and the Chillicothe (Mo.) Normal School, spending three years as a pupil in the latter institution. At length he determined upon the practice of medicine as a life work and was graduated from the Marion Sims Beaumont Medical College of St. Louis in 1903 with the M I. D. degree. He took up the profession of teaching, which he followed in Ralls county for three years prior to beginning the study of medicine and following his graduation from the Medical College he became clinical instructor in the St. Louis University, a...

Biography of Judge John W. McElhinney

For the fourth term Judge John W. McElhinney has been called to the bench of the thirteenth circuit court of Missouri having entered upon the duties of this position in 1901. His course has at all times reflected credit and honor upon tile state that has honored him and he is today numbered among the ablest of Missouri’s jurists, for film decisions have at all times been strictly fair and impartial, and moreover have been the expression of a comprehensive knowledge of tile principles of jurisprudence, combined with ability to apply accurately his principles to tile points in litigation. Judge McElhinney was born February 4, 1851, on the Mason road in Bonhomme township, between Manchester and Creve Coeur, his parents being Alexander and Martha J. (Hibler) McElhinney. It was about the year 1845 that his father removed to St. Louis county, Missouri, from Butler county, Pennsylvania, and here took up the profession of school teaching and also followed carpentering at an early day. Later, however, he turned his attention to agricultural pursuits and subsequently prepared for the bar, devoting his time and attention to law practice in St. Louis and adjoining counties from 1860 until his demise, which occurred July 3. 1985. For almost two years he had survived his wife, who spent leer entire life in St. Louis county and who passed away in December, 1893. The youthful experiences of Judge McElhinney were those of the farm bred boy. It was four miles from the old homestead to the nearest town and his youthful days were largely passed in attendance at the district school and in tile work...

Biography of A. O. Harrison

A. O. Harrison, a member of an old and honored family that has figured prominently on the pages of American history, is a leading representative of the Bartlesville bar and is now capably filling the office of city attorney. A native of Missouri, he was born in Callaway County, September 25, 1871, his parents being Jilson Payne and Catherine (Bernard) Harrison, the former a native of Kentucky, while the latter was born in Virginia. In the paternal line the ancestry is traced back to General William Henry Harrison, known as “Tippecanoe,” who won fame in the Indian wars of 1812. The paternal grandfather of the subject of this review, Micajah Volney Harrison, represented his district in the Missouri state legislature in the late ’40s and was prominent in public life. He died in 1853 and the state subsequently erected a monument to his memory. His brother, Albert Gallatin Harrison, went from Kentucky to Missouri about 1830 and he also took a leading part in public affairs, being elected congressman from Missouri at a time when that state comprised but two districts. Both Harrisonville and Harrison County were named in his honor and he died in 1836, while serving his second term in congress. The maternal grandfather, Thomas Bernard, traveled in a prairie schooner from Virginia to Missouri in 1836 and in that state he engaged in farming, up to the time of his death. In 1847 M. V. Harrison, the paternal grandfather, took up his residence on adjoining land, subsequently purchasing Mr. Bernard’s farm, which is still in possession of the family. The mother of the subject of this...

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