Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

Biographical Sketch of Mrs. Stephen Carlile

Carlile, Mrs. Stephen (See Ghigau and Hildebrand)—Sadie, daughter of S. P. Luna and Sarah (Butler) Luna, born July 10, 1888 in the Ozark County, Missouri. Mar­ried at Tahlequah, September 29, 1909 Stephen Foreman, son of Thomas Holmes and Levannah Elizabeth (Catron) Carlile. born January 5, 1873 in Tahlequah District, educated in Tahlequah District and Male Seminary. They are the parents of: Hazel, born August 1, 1910; Helen, born May 25. 1912; Stephen, born January 12, 1918; and Leo, born February 22, 1920. Stephen Foreman Carlile died September 5, 1919, Carlile is farming near Park...

Biography of George W. Pearcy

GEORGE W. PEARCY. Ability, when backed by enterprising business measures and progressive ideas, will accomplish more than any other professional or commercial requirement. An illustration of this is found in the mercantile establishment owned and conducted by George W. Pearcy at Thornfield, MO. This gentleman was born in Platte County, Missouri, in 1848, but his parents, William H. and Jane (Henry) Pearcy, were born in Kentucky in 1813 and Indiana in 1818, respectively. After their marriage, which occurred in Indiana, they came to Platte County, Missouri, later removed to Dallas County, and when the subject of this sketch was four or five years old they came to Ozark County, locating on a farm on Bryant’s Fork where the mother died in 1858. The father afterward removed to Benton County, Arkansas, and later to Johnson County, where he died in 1877, having been a farmer throughout life, and in every sense of the word a self-made man. His father, George Pearcy, was of English descent, was a music teacher by occupation, and died in Platte County, Missouri Nothing is known of the maternal grandfather. After the death of his first wife, William H. Pearcy married again, his second wife being Eliza Scrivner, by whom he had two children: Samantha and Lafayette of Laclede County. George W. Pearcy, the immediate subject of this notice, is the fifth of eight children born to his parents: John W., who died in Indian Territory in 1862; Mary A., who resides in Texas; Sarah J. (Mrs. Baker) of California; Isabella, who died in Ozark County in 1862; George W.; Winfield Scott, who died in Dallas...

Biography of George W. Osburn, M. D.

GEORGE W. OSBURN, M. D. The life of the popular, successful physician is one of incessant toil, self-denial and care, yet all true followers of the “healing art” strive to attain prominence in their profession, regardless of added burdens which will rest upon their shoulders. Such a man is George W. Osburn, who was born in Gwinnett County, Ga., November 15, 1841, a son of Ectyl and Cynthia (Nelson) Osburn (see sketch of Dr. M. H. Osburn). George W. attended the common schools of Georgia, was brought up to the healthy and useful life of the farmer, and when the great Civil War came up was forced into the Confederate service, but shortly after managed to make his escape and refugeed to Ohio, making his home in Cincinnati from 1863 to 1864, when he went to Chicago, later to the city of New York, and then back again to Chicago, where he made his home until 1868. He was engaged in carpentering and helped to build many of the early houses of that city. In 1868 he became a resident of Berry County, Missouri, but two years later located at Thornfield, in Ozark County, and in 1871 on the farm where he now lives in Douglas County, ten miles south of Ava. His farm consists of 690 acres, and he has now 200 acres under cultivation, although but small improvement had been made on the place at the time of his purchase. His farm is an exceptionally valuable one, and is especially well adapted to stockraising, to which much of his attention is devoted. In 1868 he began the...

Biography of Judge Matthew K. Arnyx

JUDGE MATTHEW K. ARNYX. This gentleman is descended from good old Irish stock, for on the green Isle of Erin his paternal great-grandparents were born, but they afterward became residents of this country prior to the Revolutionary War, in which struggle the great-grandfather participated as a member of the Colonial Army. For many generations back the family have devoted their attention to tilling the soil, and this occupation was successfully carried on by Matthew Arnyx, the grandfather of the subject of this sketch, who was a Virginian by birth. Preston Arnyx, father of Judge Matthew K. Arnyx, was born in the Old Dominion, and when a lad was taken by his father to Kentucky, of which region they were among the pioneers, and there he grew to manhood, married, and made his home until 1870, when he came with his son, Matthew K., to Ozark County, Missouri, and here he breathed his last two years later. His widow, who was born in the Blue Grass region of Kentucky, is still living, and makes her home with the subject of this sketch. Her maiden name was Eliza B. Harvey, and she is a daughter of James Harvey, who was a North Carolinian by birth, but one of the early settlers of the State which Daniel Boone made famous. His people were of English extraction and settled on American soil before the War of Independence, in which struggle the maternal grandfather took an active part. The Harvey family eventually became residents of Moniteau County, Missouri, and there James Harvey was called from life. Mrs. Arnyx is now seventy-four years old, but...

Biography of William C. Morrison

WILLIAM C. MORRISON. This gentleman is the efficient collector of Ozark County, Missouri, a position he has held since 1889, and from 1887 to 1888 he discharged the duties of county assessor. He owes his nativity to the Blue Grass State, his birth occurring in Barren County, June 10, 1842, his parents, Joseph S. and Nancy J. (Low) Morrison, being also natives of that State. The paternal grandfather, Steptoe Morrison, was a native of the Palmetto State, but was an early emigrant to Barren County, Kentucky, and later to Arkansas, in which State he spent his last days. Solomon Low, the maternal grandfather, was a Virginian, and became a pioneer settler of Barren County, Kentucky Joseph S. Morrison was born in 1826 or 1827, and when the Civil War came up he enlisted in the Fifth Kentucky Cavalry, and being a skillful blacksmith, he was made chief of the blacksmith corps of his regiment. He served from July, 1861, until his death which occurred at Nashville, Tennessee, in 1863, having proved himself a brave, faithful and conscientious soldier. He was a Master Mason, was a stanch Republican in politics, and was a man of unblemished reputation. His widow died in Barren County, Kentucky, in 1886, having become the mother of eight children: William C.; Sarah E., who died at the age of fifteen years; John, who also died young; Abigail resides in Barren County, Kentucky, and is the wife of R. Rinick; Martha A. became the wife of John T. Fords, and died in Barren County, in 1892; Solomon M. is a resident of Metcalf County, Kentucky, and the...

Biography of George W. Stone

GEORGE W. STONE. This gentleman who resides in James Creek Township, is the owner of a fine farm, which attests by its value and productiveness the excellent qualities of thoroughness and system which mark the owner. He is a native of Ozark County, Missouri, where he was born in 1848, a son of John and Maria (Bayless) Stone, natives of Tennessee, where they were reared and married. From that State they removed to Greene County, Missouri, and later to Ozark County, of the same State, where Mr. Stone died when the subject of this sketch was very small. In 1862 the family removed to Marion County, Arkansas, where Mrs. Stone breathed her last about 1882, having long been a member in good standing of the Christian Church. Her father was a farmer of Tennessee and died in that State. The paternal grandfather was also a Tennessean and reared four sons: John, Edward, William and David, all of whom died in Missouri. The subject of this sketch was the youngest save one of the following family: Sarah, who died in Marion County, the wife of James Cain; Louisa, who also died here, the wife of Robert Long; Mary Jane, who became the wife of Andrew Benton, and died in Marion County; Adaline, who died in Marion County, the wife of A. C. Musick; Julia Ann, who became the wife of William Lance, also died in this county; Edward Marion, died in this county in 1863; Amanda, became the wife of Joel A. Presley and died in Marion County; George W. and Serepta, who died young. George W. Stone remained with...

Biography of Milton G. Pattillo

MILTON G. PATTILLO. He whose name heads this sketch is a fair representative of the better class of men who began life’s battle at the lower rounds of the ladder, and through his own efforts he has gained a substantial place near the top. Practically speaking, he is today in comfortable financial circumstances, and the position he now occupies is direct evidence that he possesses the confidence and esteem of his fellow-mortals. He was born in Gallatin County, Illinois, February 11, 1826, a son of John S. and Mary (Trawsdale) Pattillo, the former of whom was born on Blue Grass soil in Kentucky, and the latter in Tennessee. They were among the very early settlers of Illinois, and there they tilled the soil successfully and reared a family of nine children; but when the Lone Star State was opened up to settlers Mr. Pattillo was one of the first to emigrate there, and there died. His widow survived him until a few years ago, and breathed her last in the State of Illinois. The subject of this sketch was reared on a farm in the State of his birth, and there continued to make his home until 1872, when he moved to Jackson County, Arkansas, later to Baxter County of the same State, and in 1874 came to Ozark County, Missouri, his home being situated about eight miles from Gainesville. He is the owner of an excellent tract of farming land on Bryant River, about three-fourths of a mile from its mouth, and ever since starting out to fight the battle of life for himself he has followed blacksmithing...

Biography of Lewis R. Pumphrey

LEWIS R. PUMPHREY, of the well-known firm of Pumphrey & Cantrell, general merchants and cotton dealers, of Lead Hill, Arkansas, was born in Cannon County, Tennessee, in 1839, to the marriage of Thomas and Margaret (Holt) Pumphrey, also natives of Tennessee. The parents were reared and married in their native State, and about 1839 moved by wagon to Ozark County, Missouri, where they were among the first settlers. There they resided for six or seven years and then moved to Fulton County, Arkansas, where Mr. Pumphrey died soon after. Mrs. Pumphrey then moved to what is now Boone County, Arkansas, where she died about 1859. Mr. Pumphrey was a successful and enterprising farmer and a man of conservative views and habits. He was one of seven or eight sons and daughters born to the marriage of Lewis Pumphrey, who also came to Missouri in 1839, but subsequently settled in Fulton County, Arkansas, where he died when quite aged. He was also a farmer. The maternal grand-father, William Holt, was a native Tennessean, but in 1838 he came to Ozark County, Missouri, subsequently settling in what is now Boone County, Arkansas, where he followed farming and stockraising successfully until his death in 1859. He was a pioneer of the Ozark Region and a man universally respected. His wife died at Lead Hill about 1888. They were the parents of thirteen children, three of whom served in the Confederate Army: R. S., William and James. After the death of her husband the mother of Lewis R. married William Coker, by whom she had six children. Three children were born to her...

Biography of Robert Q. Gilliland

ROBERT Q. GILLILAND. This prominent citizen of Ozark County, Missouri, was born here on the 22d of October, 1845, a son of Robert and Eliza (Kane) Gilliland, who came from Tennessee to this county in 1842, and settled in the northwestern part of this county, near Thornfield, on a farm. Both parents were born in Tennessee, and to that State the paternal grandfather, Robert Gilliland, removed in the early history of the State. Robert Gilliland, the father of the subject of this sketch, settled on a tract of Government land and made his home in the neighborhood where he first settled until his death, which occurred in 1891. In politics he was a Republican, and during the Civil War was a member of the Missouri State Militia. As a farmer he was successful, and as a citizen was public-spirited and helpful, and as a neighbor was kind and obliging. His wife was a daughter of James Kane, a native of Tennessee, who came to Ozark County about 1842 and settled in the same neighborhood in which Mr. Gilliland settled, and there spent the rest of his days. Mrs. Gilliland died in February, 1894. She bore her husband six children: James, who resides in this county, was a soldier during the Civil War in the Sixteenth Missouri Cavalry; Robert Q.; John H., who was also a soldier of the Sixteenth Missouri Cavalry; Rebecca is the wife of William E. Welch; William H. is living near the old home, and Eliza is the wife of G. W. Johnson. Robert Q. Gilliland was reared and educated in Ozark County, and when the...

Biography of Andrew J. Coffey

ANDREW J. COFFEY. Ozark County, Missouri, is well known for the richness of its soil, and among those industrious farmers who have assisted in making this section the rich agricultural district that it is may be mentioned Andrew J. Coffey, who was born in Ashe County, N. C., in 1833, of which State his parents, Cleveland and Susan (Hayes) Coffey, were also natives. During the early boyhood of Andrew J. Coffey, he was taken by his parents to Hawkins County, Tennessee, and soon after to Granger County, where the mother died some fifty years ago. Mr. Coffey remarried afterward and then returned to the Old North State, where he died about 1866, having been a farmer and mechanic throughout life. He was a man of much industry, led an active and upright life, and in religion was a Missionary Baptist. His father, Jesse Coffey, was an early settler of North Carolina and breathed his last in Burke County when Andrew J. was a small lad. He was of Irish ancestry, a farmer by occupation, and was a minister of the Primitive Baptist Church. The children born to Cleveland and Susan Coffey are as follows: Andrew J.; William, who was a soldier of the Confederate Army and was killed at Mission Ridge; Thomas was a Federal soldier, but nothing has been heard of him since the war; Martha died young; Susan E. is the wife of Aaron McGinnis, of Ozark County, Missouri The education and rearing which was given the average farmer’s boy of his day was given to Andrew J. Coffey, and in 1849 he came to the conclusion...
Page 1 of 41234

Pin It on Pinterest