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Biography of Abraham Lincoln Barner

Some of the most substantial people of Kansas today, well able to ride about over the improved highways in their automobiles, came into the state in the early days with the slow and tedious method of the prairie schooner or the mover’s wagon. Such an emigrant party arrived in Sumner County in 1873. They had come overland from Central Illinois, being twenty-six days on route. Three wagons comprised the train, and the driver of one of those wagons, then thirteen years of age, was Abrabam Lincoln Barner, who is now living retired at Belle Plaine in Sumner County, and for years had been prominently known as a farmer, stockman, land owner, banker and closely identified with many of the business and civic affairs of his home section. The head of the family at that time was his father, Michael Barner. Michael Barner had come out to Sumner County in the spring of 1873, with two other men, and they bought three-quarter seetions, two for $800 each and another for $850. One of these quarters had an unfinished house on it, but one of the familiar Kansas winds of that day soon blew it away. When Michael Barner brought his family out he bought 160 acres near one of the three quarter sections previously mentioned, paying $1,000 for it. Its chief improvement was a log cabin, and that old building is still standing there. Michael Barner during the following years became one of Sumner County’s most valued citizens. At the time of his death he owned 960 acres of land, and had devoted it to general farming and the raising...

Biography of Grant Elwood Kelsey

Grant Elwood Kelsey. General farming and the raising of live stock are engaging the attention of many foresighted men in Kansas. Many of these have additional interests as had Grant Elwood Kelsey, a well known citizen and prosperons agriculturist of Menoken Township, Shawnee County, but their land and its rich yielding occupies the first place in their affections. Grant Elwood Kelsey was born on a farm in Dearborn County, Indiana, March 14, 1867. His parents were Scott and Mahala (Allen) Kelsey, who are mentioned elsewhere in this work. He attended the country schools in Indiana and later near Topeka, Kansas, and still later spent two years in the agricultural college at Manhattan, from which he was recalled home by the illness of his father. He was then nineteen years old and the eldest son and the management of the home farm fell upon him. In 1889 he entered a mill at Oxford, Kansas, and learned the milling business under his uncle, B. F. Kelsey, and during the three years he remained there his only brother had charge of the farm. After he returned to Shawnee County, Mr. Kelsey, at the solicitation of the Farmers Co-operative Store Company, became manager of the store and continued in that position until 1892 when the business was sold to the owner of the Exchange Grocery of Topeka and the company was dissolved. Mr. Kelsey had made money for the stockholders, their business being the retailing of farmers’ supplies. In 1896 he bought forty acres of his present farm, working it with his brother M. T. Kelsey, until 1897, and in 1899 bought more...

Biography of Dawson W. Cooley

Dawson W. Cooley is president of the Oxford Bank in Sumner County. His home has been in Kansas for upwards of half a century, and while his years have been chiefly employed in the banking business, he has also identified himself with various other enterprises for the good and upbuilding of this state. Mr. Cooley is one of the surviving veterans of the great Union army during the Civil war. He served during the first two years of that struggle in one of the noted regiments of New York State. His enlistment was in Company C of the Ninth New York Volunteer Infantry, known as the Hawkins Zouaves. It was a two-year regiment, and its arduous service was indicated by mention of the more prominent battles in which it was engaged, as follows: Big Bethel, Virginia, the capture of Hatteras on Roanoke Island, Elizabeth City, Newbern, Camden, South Mountain, Antietam, Fredericksburg and Suffolk. Mr. Cooley was with his regiment in all these movements and campaigns, and at the expiration of his enlistment returned home and for a short time was in the employ of the Erie Railway Company. He then went to Nashville, Tennessee, and was in the military railroad service of the Federal Government until the close of the war. He was born on a farm near Attica in Wyoming County, New York, August 11, 1839, being the oldest of the five children of John B. Weltha A. (Winchester) Cooley. His parents were also natives of New York State. His grandfather, Grove Cooley, came from Connecticut into eastern New York and later removed to the western part of...

Beal, Bettie Cook Mrs. – Obituary

Bettie Cook Beal, 74, a former Baker County resident, died May 1, 2004, at the home of her daughter and son-in-law, Nadine and Milt Rantz, in Oregon City. Her funeral will be at 1 p.m. Friday at Crown Funeral Home in Milwaukie. She was born Jan. 15, 1930, at Oxford, Kan., and moved to Halfway with her family at the age of 10. She moved to Baker City as a teen-ager. Survivors include her daughters, Nadine, Wardean and Jeanette, and a son, Bill, all living in the Portland area; 12 grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren; a brother, Lloyd R. Cook, and sister-in-law, Iona Cook, and a sister and brother-in-law, Nita and Robert Hendriksen, of Baker City; and many nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by her parents, Will and Grace Ward Cook; four brothers, Ralph, Fred, Carl and Glenn; and two sisters, Marie and Ruby. Used with permission from: Baker City Herald, Baker City, Oregon, May 7, 2004 Transcribed by: Belva...

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