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Town Officials of Fryeburg, Maine

Clerks Richard Kimball, 1777-78; Capt. Joseph Frye, Jr.,1779- Paul Langdon, 1786-91; Joseph F. Swan, 1792-98; Wm. Russell, 1799-1801; Paul Langdon, 1802; John McMillan, 1803-06; Jos. F. Swan, 1807-08; Wm. Russell, 7 809-11; Paul Langdon, 1812; Wm. Russell, 1813; P. Langdon,1814; Wm. Russell 1815, Dec. 4, died; N. G. Jewett, Dec. 4, 1815; James Osgood, 1816-18; Joseph F. Swan, 1819; Thomas Webster, 1820-22; Asa Charles, 1823-30; Andrew McMillan, 1831-32; Charles Abbott, 1833-43; Joseph Chandler, 1844-56; Marshall Walker, 1857-64; Thos. S. McIntire, 1865-74; 1). Lowell Lamson , 1875; T. S. McIntire, 1876-86; Norman Charles, 1887-1907. Treasurers Jas. 0. McMillan, 1850-56; Geo. B. Barrows, 1857-59; A. H. Walker, 1860-61; Timothy C. Ward, 7.862; Henry Hyde smith, 1863-66; T. C. Ward, 1867-68; John Locke, 1869-91; .) , h’. Merrill, 1892-1907. Selectmen and Assessors 1850-Edw. L. Osgood, H. D. E. Walker, James Walker. 1851-Edw. L. Osgood, H. D. E. Walker, Simeon C. Wiley. 1852-Asa Charles, S. C. Hobbs, Benj. W. McKeen. 1853-54-Asa Charles, H. D. E. Hutchins, S. C. Wiley. 1855-Edw. L. Osgood, 13. D. E. Hutchins, S. C. Wiley. 1856-Edw. L. Osgood, S. C. Wiley, James Walker. 1857-A sa Charles, James Walker, S. A. Bradley. 1858-Asa Charles, S. A. Bradley, Henry G. Walker. 1859-Asa Charles, H. G. Walker, James Walker. 1860-Geo. B. Barrows, H. 13. Walker, Caleb Frye. 1861-Geo. B. Barrows, Peter Charles, Enoch W. Wiley. 1862-64-Asa Charles, Henry G. Walker, Caleb Frye. 1865-Asa Charles, Henry D. E. Hutchins, Asa 0. Pike. 1866-Asa Charles, S. C. Hobbs, Samuel 13. Charles. 1867-68-Asa Charles, S. C. Hobbs, P. A. Bradley. 1869-70-S. C. Hobbs, Wm. Gordon, 2d., Albion P. Gordon. 1871-Asa Charles, P. A. Bradley, Chas....

Fryeburg Horse Railroad

This company was chartered in March 1887, for the purpose of establishing and maintaining a horse railroad in the village and to run to the Chautauqua grounds. It was at once organized and $5075 capital stock issued, which was taken by thirty stockholders. The road was installed and equipped that season, opened July 25, but did not run regularly until the following year. This road has remained under the general management of Seth W . Fife, and has been in operation each year since it begun. A total of 12,000 persons are sometimes carried annually during the running season, from June to October. Three miles of road are laid. This is the only horse railroad in the state. Four years ago this road was sold to the White Mountain Paper Co. who sold to the Pater Publishing Co. three years later. A charter granted by the last legislature provides for the extension of this road to Stow and Lovell, and it is probable that one or both of these places will soon be reached by a new line of road to be operated by horses or electricity. The plan for a road to Lovell was contemplated by the original promoters, but was not executed before disposing of the...

Fryeburg Military History

Undoubtedly the greater number of the first arrivals in Fryeburg had seen service in the French and Indian wars, some of whom enlisted in the Patriot service at the breaking out of the Revolution. Of this number was General Frye, the grantee under whom many of his townsmen had fought at Fort William Henry and other early engagements. At the breaking out of the Revolution he was called to Cambridge to command a patriot force, but soon after returned to his home town. Many volunteers proceeded to Portland and other points where they entered the Patriot lines, some of whom never returned, while others for their heroic conduct and courage rose to the rank of commanders and returned with titles by which they were afterwards known. In 1780 over £17,000, probably paper, and £108 of “hard money” was voted for this cause, together with 10,515 pounds of beef, and seven men to fill the ranks of the depleted Continental Army. During that summer six men were sent to the aid of Falmouth, two men for six months and two men for three months were hired for service in the Continental Army. This town has ever responded readily and liberally of her best men. For a period of several decades prior to the Civil war, the able bodied men of the town were regularly trained on the “Muster Grounds,” while the annual parade was only equaled by the modern county fair. The Civil War enlistments for Fryeburg will appear at the end of the historical section of this...

Patrons of Husbandry

Fryeburg Grange, No. 197, was organized at Fryeburg Centre in Feb. 1888, with 18 charter members. B. Walker McKeen was chosen the first master, and has been followed in this capacity by John F. Charles, A. P. Gordon, John S. Ames, David Chandler, E. C. Buzzell, I. A. Walker, Simeon Charles and A. W. McKeen. This order now numbers fiftyeight members. The leading officers chosen for 1907 are A. W. McKeen, master; Leon D. Charles, overseer; Mehitable McAllister, lecturer; Rosina McKeen, chaplin, Simeon Charles, treasurer, and I. A. McKeen,...

Grover Post

Grover Post, No. 126, was organized by sixteen veterans of Fryeburg and Lovell on Dec. 24, 1884. Wm. C. Towle was chosen first commander, Tobias L. Eastman and others completing the staff, the itemized list of which was burned in the recent fire. The membership increased until at one time there were sixty-nine members. For about two years the meetings were alternated between this village and Lovell, which arrangement was followed by the formation of Parker Post at the latter village. Grover Post now numbers 35 members. Grover Circle, No. 11, was formed by the ladies as a relief corps. The present officers of the post are E. J. Brackett, P. C.; Orrin R. Barrows, S. V. C.; J. H. Johnson, J. V. C.; Henry Andrews, Q. M., and T. L. Eastman,...

Fryeburg Village Fire Companies ~ Fires

This corporation was chartered March 1, 1887, for the purpose of organizing for protection from fire. On the last day of the month an organizing meeting was held at which John C. Gerry was chosen clerk; Thos. C. Shirley, treasurer; Asa 0. Pike, Wm. Gordon and John Weston, assessors; and A. R. Jenness, F. L. Mark and Seth W. Fife, fire wardens. This action followed the burning of the original and celebrated Oxford House which occurred Feb. 14, preceding. The earliest DESTRUCTIVE FIRE of note was in 1 843, Sept. 15, when “Eastman’s Coffee House,” with two stores and two stables were burned. Twenty years later, Nov. 17, 1863, the store of Major T. C. Wand and Dea. John Evans’ shop on Portland street were burned. In the shop were the last relics of the original Academy which had been removed to the site of the stone school house where it was occupied for school purposes until replaced by the stone structure. It was then converted into the shop and dwelling. The last and most destructive fire in the annals of the town occurred Aug. 31, 1906, when a fire started in the new Oxford House then occupied by one hundred guests. ‘Although the fire started about 10 o’clock A. M., it was soon beyond control and before it could be subdued $150,000 worth of village property and many of the stately elms which had graced Portland street for a century and which time alone can replace, were ruined. Among the destroyed property was H. G. Freeman’s printing plant with all machinery; S. W. Fife’s house and a store...

The Maine Indians

Before the encroachment of pale faced settlers, the entire valley of the Saco and its tributaries was peopled by the numerous Sokokis Indians. These were considered the parent tribe of the Abenaki Nation, which at one time peopled the whole of Maine. One of the most eloquent and statesmanlike of their chiefs once said in council, “We received our lands from the Great Father of Life; we hold only from Him.” Their title was unquestionable and unmolested, they roamed the valley from their village at the Lower Falls (Saco) to the settlement on the great bend, on the intervales of Fryeburg. These were in many respects a noble race of red men, evincing unmistakable evidence of having descended from a higher state, and still retained a fine sense of honor and personal dignity. The Sokokis tribe1 was once so numerous that they could call nine hundred warriors to arms, but war and pestilence reduced their number to a, mere handful.1 The residence of the sagamores was on Indian Island, above the lower falls. Among the names of the chiefs who dwelt hereabout were those of Capt. Sunday, the two Heagons, and Squando who succeeded Fluellen. For some years these Indians lived with the white settlers in peace and quietness, some of them acquiring a fair knowledge of the English language by their intercourse. When the increasing number of colonists encroached upon their lands, and hatred and discontent had been engendered by the ill treatment of the whites, these Indians gradually moved up river and joined their brethren who lived in the villages at Pequawket and on the Ossipee. As...

The Pequawket Expedition

On April 16, the company bade farewell to their friends and kindred in Dunstable, Mass., the home of many of the party, and proceeded to Contoocook, and to the west shore of Ossipee Lake. Here they halted and erected a fort which should serve as a rallying point and base of supplies. By this time two men had become disabled. One had returned home accompanied by a friend, Benj. Kidder was left at the fort, with the surgeon and a guard of eight. The remaining thirty-four men took up the trail to Pequawket with good courage. On Tuesday, two days before the battle, the party were suspicious that they had been discovered by the enemy, and on Friday night the guard heard them creeping through the underbrush about their encampment. At an early hour Saturday morning, May 8th, while they were yet at their devotions, the report of a gun was heard, and soon an Indian was seen standing upon a point of land extending into Saco (now Lovewell’s) pond. They supposed this was a decoy, to draw them into ambush. A conference was immediately held to determine what course to pursue. The men were anxious for an engagement, but Capt. Lovewell seems to have assented against his wishes. They prepared for action. Assuming that the foe was still in front he ordered the men to lay down their packs that they might advance with greater caution and be less hampered in the fight. When the party had proceeded slowly for about a mile they discovered an Indian approaching among the trees. Several discharged their pieces at him. He...

Bridges, Canal, Post Offices of Fryeburg, Maine

Dea. Richard Eastman operated a ferry for many years near the point where the toll bridge was erected in 1870; this bridge is 76 feet long, being the shortest of the seven bridges which span the Saco and Canal. The first bridge built was at Swan’s Falls about 1780. The oldest now in use is Weston’s bridge, 250 feet long, built in 1844, according to Wm. Gordon. Canal bridge 272 feet long, was built in 1846; Walker’s bridge 164 feet, in 1848; Charles river bridge (a tributary) 87 feet, in 1856; Island bridge, 110 feet, in 1862; Hemlock bridge 116, in 1867; the Toll bridge (now free), in 1870; and the new iron bridge at the Harbor 80 feet, built in 1894. All except the latter are covered. The canal was begun in 1812, when a narrow channel was cut. The freshet of 1820 greatly widened the channel, reduced the length of the Saco in town from 36 miles to 24 miles, and draining an extensive area of valuable arable land. Fryeburg post office was established Jan. 1, 1798, with Moses Ames, postmaster. The post office at the Center was established Feb. 19, 1833, Henry G. Farrington, P. M. West Fryeburg post office was established in July 1887, Mrs. E. P. Hutchins,...

West Oxford Agricultural Association

The WEST OXFORD AGRICULTURAL ASSOCIATION AND FAIR was organized and established in 1851. For over half a century this has been an important factor in the life and social and commercial developement of a wide field.
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