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Biography of Rev. Cyrus R. Rice

Rev. Cyrus R. Rice, of Hartford, is one of the revered fathers of the Methodist Church in Kansas. He comes of a Tennessee family, and was himself born near Lebanon, that state, August 27, 1833. His father was a physician of many years’ practice in Tennessee and Missouri. The son also studied medicine, but his decided inclinations were toward the ministry, and in 1853 he united with the St. Louis Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. The next year he was licensed to preach and appointed to the Thomasville Circuit, and in 1855 was sent as a missionary to Osawatomie, Kansas. In March, 1856, he returned to Patterson, Missouri, married Lucy A. McCormick, and spent most of his bridal trip on horseback with his wife, returning to Kansas. During the succeeding three years he organized various societies along the Neoshe River, at Fort Scott and Tecumseh, and in 1859 was assigned to the Shawneetown charge, where he ministered for two years. During the Civil war the Methodist Church, South, withdrew from Kansas and Mr. Rice was without regular appointment until March, 1865, when he united with the conference of the Methodist Episeopal Church and was assigned to the congregations at Centropolis and Prairie City. In 1867 he moved to Lyon County, and was the first presiding elder of the district. After four years of service in that capacity he became pastor of Sixth Street Methodist Church of Leavenworth, and, after having other charges, was, for a time, associate editor of the Emporia News. In 1880 he was again appointed presiding elder of the Emporia District, serving thus four...

Biographical Sketch of John Francis

John Francis, one of the leading pioneers and public men of Allen County and his section of the state, was born in Norfolk, England, April 24, 1837, and soon after be had attained his majority came to the struggling territory as an ardent advocate of free statehood. In the fall of 1858 he settled at Osawatomie, and during the following winter was one of John Brown’s closest followers. In March, 1859, he took up his residence on a pre-emption claim in Allen County. In July, 1861, he enlisted in Company D, Fifth Kansas Regiment, and served until November, 1863, when he was discharged for disability. Soon afterward he was elected clerk of Allen County and, by his re-election in 1864, held the office for two terms. He then served for two suecessive terms as county treasurer; performed the duties of clerk of the District Court from 1865 to 1868, and in 1869-77 was a resident of Iola. During that period he was a merchant of the place, although, by appointment and election, he acted as state treasurer in 1874-82. In 1899 and in 1901 he was chosen a member of the State House of Representatives, at the latter session being chairman of the Ways and Means Committee. Later he served on the tax commission of the state, in which capacity he added to his reputation as an able and conservative...

Biography of John G. Haskell

John G. Haskell, who made a reputation both as a soldier and an architect, was born in Chittenden County, Vermont, February 5, 1832, and was educated at Wesleyan Academy, Wilbraham, Massachusetts, and Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island. In 1855 he entered an architect’s office in Boston, and two years later settled at Lawrence, Kansas. During the Civil war Captain Haskell served as assistant quartermaster general of Kansas, as quartermaster of the Third Kansas and the Tenth Kansas Volunteers, as captain and assistant quartermaster on the staff of Gen. James G. Blunt, and chief quartermaster of the Army of the Frontier. In 1866 he was made architect of the state house, building the east wing, and as state architect subsequently constructed much of the capitol; also the State University, Snow Hall, the insane asylums at Topeka and Osawatomie, the reform school at Topeka and the reformatory, were all designed and largely built by...

Biography of Charles R. Jennison, Dr.

Dr. Charles R. Jennison, of Leavenworth, a brigadier general during the Civil war and afterward a leader in the public affairs of the state, was born in Jefferson County, New York, June 6, 1834. When he was twelve years old he moved with his parents to Wisconsin, and at the age of nineteen years he began to study medicine. After completing his medical course he practiced for a short time in Wisconsin and then came to Kansas, settling at Osawatomie in 1857. Within a short time he moved to Mound City, where he remained for three years, and then went to Leavenworth. Doctor Jennison was one of John Brown’s stanch supporters. Governor Robinson commissioned him captain of the Mound City Guards on February 19, 1861, and on September 4th he was commissioned lieutenant colonel of the Seventh Kansas Cavalry, which became known as “Jennison’s Jayhawkers,” being assigned to the command of the western border of Missouri with headquarters at Kansas City. He determined to clear the border of guerrillas, and his a ccess in that military undertaking was such that General Hunter appointed him acting brigadier general, and he was placed in command of “all the troops in Kansas west of and on the Neosho.” At the time of the Lawrence massacre Governor Carney called upon Jennison to raise a regiment, of which he was made colonel on October 17, 1863, with headquarters at Leavenworth. Whils in command at Fort Leavenworth he was authorized on March 5, 1864, to raise and organize a post battery, and in the following July was placed in command of a regiment in the...

Biography of Charles Sumner Newlon, M.D.

Dr. Charles Sumner Newlon, who for the past fifteen years has engaged in the practice of medicine and surgery in Kansas City, Missouri, and who for many years prior to this period was a physician and surgeon of the state of Kansas, was born at Newton’s Grove, Cass county, Iowa, in 1858, a son of Dr. William Smithson and Maria (Wimp) Newlon. The ancestral line is traced back to his great-grandfather, John Newlon. The grandfather, Hiram Newlon, was born in Virginia and was a cousin of Dolly Madison, wife of the fourth president of the United States and also a relative of Mrs. Patrick Henry. The wife of Hiram Newlon was Margaret Field, of Kentucky, a cousin of Governor Shortridge, of Alabama, also of Wade Hampton and of Judge Field, of Louisiana. Dr. W. S. Newton, father of Dr. Charles S. Newlon, was also a prominent physician of the west. He collected the indigenous plants of southern Kansas for the Centennial Exposition and made many geological surveys in Kansas, Oklahoma and Missouri, contributing valuable collections to Washburn College and the Smithsonian Institute. In 1882 he investigated and wrote articles upon the screw fly. About this time he contended through the medical press that consumption and some ten or twelve other diseases were caused by germs. He discovered five or six fossil cephalopods, a crawfish and several insects new to science. He also discovered a number of medicinal plants and introduced them into the practice of medicine, some of these being eliphantopes, sabbatia, grindelia, hellanthus, etc., and for many years he published the Golden Rod, a scientific paper. Dr. Charles...

Biography of Davison L. Youmans

Occupying public office ins Muskogee and previously in Kansas through a number of years, Davison L. Youmans has ever been found loyal to the trust reposed in him and has labored earnestly and effectively to advance public welfare and municipal progress. While born in the east the greater part of his life has been spent west of the Mississippi and he has ever been imbued with the spirit of western enterprise and progress which has been a dominant factor in the up building of this section of the country. A native of Pennsylvania, his birth occurred in Freemansburg, that state, October 30, 1866, his parents being William and Amanda (Lynn) Youmans, the former a farmer by occupation. The removal of the family to Kansas during the early boyhood of Davison L. Youmans enabled him to pursue his education in the public schools of Osawatomie and when his school days were over he started out in the business world in connection with the ice trade in Kansas. For some time he was engaged in ice manufacturing in Iola and in Olathe, Kansas, but disposed of his business there in 1919. In April, 1903, he organized the Crystal Ice Company of Muskogee and carried on business under that style until 1911, when he established the City Ice & Cold Storage Company and through the intervening period to the year 1920 successfully conducted business. He then sold out, having in the meantime enjoyed an extensive trade which made his enterprise a profitable one. From that time to the present he has been active in public office. He served as a member of...

Biography of Byron Jennings Carver

Byron Jennings Carver, who served as county attorney for Miami County from 1913 to 1917, had not only proved his ability on many occasions as an able lawyer, but also as a forceful man of affairs and one who is willing to fight for his convictions and his position as to right. Mr. Carver had a hard struggle to get into the legal profession, being a poor young man and having to teach and struggle along at the same time that he was studying and qualifying for the bar. He is a native of Indiana, having been born at Franklin in Johnson County July 31, 1874. He was one of the seven children of Captain Socrates and Mary (Day) Carver, both natives of Indiana. His father was a son of an associate judge of the Court of Common Pleas, who had come from Virginia to Indiana. Grandfather Judge Carver married a Miss Tracy. The Tracy family came to America in 1640, from Scotland, and located in Maryland. They were a mingling of Scotch, Irish and English ancestry. Nathaniel Tracy and some of his brothers, Charles, Thomas, Philip and William, were also soldiers in the Revolutionary war. Nathaniel Tracy subsequently removed to Kentucky and lived there until 1818. Thomas and John F. Tracy, sons of William and Elizabeth (Tanner) Tracy, were soldiers in the Mexican war and fought at Buena Vista and in other battles of that struggle. John F. Tracy was killed on the plains while on the way to California in 1853. James Tracy was a soldier in the War of 1812 under Governor Shelby of Kentucky. Capt....

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