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Biography of John F. Sheehan

JOHN F. SHEEHAN. – The gentleman whose name heads this brief memoir, an excellent portrait of whom appears in this history, has been a leading business man and resident of Port Townsend, Washington for almost thirty years. Mr. Sheehan is a native of the Sunny south, and was born in Baltimore Maryland, in 1840. When but an infant he suffered the irreparable loss of his father by death. His widowed mother then, with her two sons, our subject being but eighteen months old, paid a visit to Ireland, and at the end of one year returned to Baltimore. John F. was then taken by an uncle to New Orleans, where he received his education and resided until fifteen years of age. He then started out to do for himself, still being but a mere boy. He started for the Pacific coast, coming via the Nicaragua route, and arrived in San Francisco in the summer of 1856. The first two years in the Golden state were spent in the mines and at different occupations until the breaking out of the ever-memorable Frazer River excitement, when Mr. Sheehan joined the gold-seekers and came north, only to find on arriving at the mines that “All is not gold that glitters,” and also to find that the great excitement which had lured thousands was a humbug. On leaving the mines Mr. Sheehan came to Port Townsend and embarked in the stove and tinware business, in which he is still engaged. For the past twenty-nine years he has done a lucrative and very successful business, and in 1888 built the beautiful building in which...

Biography of Hiram C. Whitley

Hiram C. Whitley. The State of Kansas is filled with interesting men, many of them known to the world at large. The city of Emporia had several. One is a prominent business man, who for upwards of forty years had given his time and energies to the upbuilding of that locality. This is Hiram C. Whitley who was at one time chief of the secret service division of the United States Treasury. The story of his life, particularly the early years, reads like a book, and in fact his experiences have been described in a book which was published about twenty years ago and which throws an interesting light on life and times in the far South during the Civil war period and also that era known as the reconstruction period for ten years following the great Civil war. Mr. Whitley wrote this book under the title “In It” and it is somewhat in the nature of an autobiography, told simply and modestly, but illuminating that historic epoch in our nation’s history with which it deals. The author says: “The incidents related in this book are founded principally on facts, as they came to me during an experience of twelve years in the Secret Service of the United States Government.” Hiram C. Whitley is a native of the Pine Tree State, but his experiences have covered a larger part of the United States and he is now past the age of four score. He was born in Waldo County, Maine, August 6, 1832. His father, William Whitley, was born in Glasgow, Scotland, in 1796, and was brought by his...

Biography of Peter Taschetta

Peter Taschetta. One of the early permanent settlers of Leavenworth was Peter Taschetta, a native of Switzerland, born in Canton, January 6, 1822. He was of Italian ancestry, but long before his birth his people, living on the border between Italy and Switzerland, had property in the former country and his parents became Swiss subjects by purchase. The father was interested in stained glass manufacturing and, as a contractor, traveled extensively, particularly in France, overseeing the placing of stained glass in cathedrals and other structures, some of these being rare examples of artistic coloring. He employed a large number of men to do the work and, as his son Peter grew to years of responsibility, he became timekeeper and also financial agent for his father. In such capacity he visited different countries, necessarily learning their language and before he came to America not only spoke four languages fluently, but also wrote them. Peter Taschetta continued this life of constant travel in Europe until he was twenty-seven years old, it possibly having its influence in leading him to consider visiting America, a far-distant land in those days of slow-sailing vessels. In 1849 he landed at New Orleans, Louisiana, and from there journeyed up the Mississippi to St. Louis. In that city he engaged in mercantile pursuits for a time, but had not yet had the spirit of wanderlust been extinguished, for he eagerly gave ear to the stories of the wonderful country that lay west of the Missouri and finally determined to visit it and see for himself. In the spring of 1854 Peter Taschetta came to Leavenworth, which was...

Mulvehill, J. T. Mrs. – Obituary

Mrs. J. T. Mulvehill, a former resident of Union, died in the Baker Hospital Sunday, December 1, 1918. The funeral took place Monday, December 2, from the Catholic Church in Baker. Josephine La Notte Mulvehill was born in New Orleans, May 28, 1862, and died in Baker, Oregon, December 1, 1918. She was taken suddenly ill Friday night November 29-her ailment was pronounced acute diabetes. She was rushed to St. Elizabeth’s hospital at Baker, early Saturday morning, where every possible aid was given her, but she passed away Sunday forenoon at 11 o’clock, surrounded by all her family. The Mulvehills have been residents of Oregon 21 years, residing in Union all of the time, except the last three years, when they moved to a ranch near Haines. Mrs. Mulvehill is survived by her husband, J. T. Mulvehill; two sons, Andreas and Leo, of Haines; two daughters, Mrs. Alva Peters and Mrs. Herman White, of North Powder. She was a loving and affectionate wife and mother, a kind friend and neighbor, beloved by all who knew her. The funeral services where held at Baker, Monday December 2, at 4 p. m. at St. Francis Cathedral, Rev. Father August E. Loeser officiating. The remains were shipped the same night to Portland for cremation and were accompanied by all of the immediate family. Mrs. Mulvehill was a member of Preston W. R. C. No. 22, a benefit member of Union Circle No. 209, and also of Artisans. Many Union friends extend sincere sympathy to the bereaved family. Quite a number of Union people attended the funeral services. Contributed by: Larry...

Biography of John Dovell

JOHN DOVELL. – Mr. Dovell is one of those men who have belabored fortune, and have knocked about the world until it is sufficient to turn one’s hair gray simply to listen to their adventures. A native of the Azores, of Portuguese parentage and born in 1836, he came to Portland, Maine, at the age of fourteen, and learned shipbuilding. He left in four years and plied his trade in New Orleans, shipping thence to Liverpool, and coming as ship’s carpenter from that foreign port to San Francisco. He soon came up the coast to Portland, Oregon, and worked upon the steam ferry Independence, building near the “South End Sawmill” by Powell, Coffin, “Preacher” Kelly, and Hankins, the captain, to run opposition to Stevens’ ferry. Starting for the Frazer river mines in 1859, he met a number of friends at Victoria, and, together with seventeen of them, put across the Georgian Gulf in rowboats, making a dangerous passage. They then followed up the river by the Skilloot route to Horse Beef bar, the company then separating and going to prospecting. Dovell made no strike. Some twenty of the company on the way back went down to the Littoot Lake, and in the absence of a boat to go down to Langley were compelled to take one by force from one Robertson, for which high-handed act they were arrested upon their arrival at Victoria three days after, and compelled to pay Robertson eighty-seven dollars. The judge gave Dovell ten dollars for his part taken in the matter. Returning to Portland, he worked in Jacob’s wagon shop, and in the spring...

Biography of James G. Sandidge

James G. Sandidge. In the colonial history of the United States may be found frequent mention of names that are familiar and even distinguished at present throughout the great Middle West. They ring with achievement as in the old days, and although generations have passed since their first bearers lived and labored and increased on American soil, the stock is the same and the vigor of the younger branches gives testimony to the strength of the parent root. A long line of notable men have borne the name of Sandidge, from the founding of Jamestown, Virginia, and the early settlement of Charleston, South Carolina. A well known representative of this old and prominent family is found in Dr. James G. Sandidge, surgeon, banker and capitalist, who for almost a quarter of a century has been a foremost citizen of Mulberry, Kansas. James G. Sandidge was born November 12, 1870, in the City of New Orleans, Louisiana. His parents were James G. and Susan K. (Wilson) Sandidge, the former of whom was born at New Orleans in 1840 and is the only surviving child of his parents, Hon. John M. and Mary E. (Gilmer) Sandidge. The grandfather of Doctor Sandidge was born in 1819, in Alabama, and died at New Orleans in 1908. He was reared in Alabama and did not remove to Louisiana until after his marriage. In early years he was a large planter and later in life was a journalist. He was exceedingly active in politics and served as a member of Congress in Louisiana for twenty years preceding the Civil war and subsequently was elected lieutenant-governor...

Biographical Sketch of Galland, S., Dr.

Dr. S. Galland, physician and surgeon, came to North Topeka, Kan. In 1870, and practiced medicine a year; thence to Kansas City, Mo., and practiced his profession two years, when he moved to Dodge City, Kan., and permanently located, where he has been engaged in the practice of medicine until 1878, since which time he has retired from active business. He was born in Posen, Prussia, Germany, May 11, 1822, and was educated in his native country. He graduated from the old school of medicine at Berlin, in the class of 1847. Practiced in Germany two years, when, in 1849, he came to America, locating in New York City, in his profession until 1851; thence went to California and followed his profession until 1857. He then went to St. Louis, Mo., practicing his profession there and at New Orleans, La., until 1868, when he located in Kansas City, Mo., until he came to Kansas. He ran a hotel about six years in Dodge City. Was married October 13, 1858, to Miss Bertha Leon, born in Cassal High, Germany, December 12, 1825. He has served as Township Treasurer, City Alderman, etc. He is a member of the Masonic order, including the ten first degrees of...

Biography of Jacob Kamm

No history of navigation upon the Willamette or Columbia would be complete without reciting the part borne by the subject of this sketch. From the time the demands of travel and commerce created business of any magnitude in this direction, down to the present time, he has been more or less prominently connected with this interest, and especially important was the part he bore in the incipient stages of its development. He was born in Switzerland, December 12, 1823. At the age of eight, with his father, who had resigned his commission as captain in the Swiss army, he came to America. They removed to Illinois, where for a year his father was employed in farming and milling. From there they went to St. Louis, where his father conducted a hotel for some years, after which they removed to New Orleans. Here, at the age of twelve, young Kamm commenced the earnest side of life in a printing office, where he was employed until after the death of his father during the fearful yellow fever epidemic in the summer of 1837. In the fall of that year with only a few dollars in his pocket, he started for St. Louis. Upon his arrival he secured a position as a cabin boy on a small steamer called the Ark. In the engineer of this steamer he found a kind friend, and during several following winters he boarded with his family. It was during this time he secured the principal educational advantages he ever enjoyed, going to school in the winter, and spending much time in studying while on the boat...

Biographical Sketch of James Brown

Jim Brown purchased land in Section 25 of Battle Township, Ida County, Iowa, on October 10, 1873. On March 29, 1874, he came back to live on the farm. James Brown was born in Perry County, Ohio, January 16, 1843. He was from a family of 13 children, nine sons and 4 daughters. His father was John Brown and he was born in 1800 in Waterford County, Ireland, and at the age of 15 came to the United States, landing at New Orleans. He worked for 7 years in the Carolinas and Georgia, and then located in Perry County, Ohio, where he married Mary Clark who came here to the United States from Ireland when a little girl. He came to Jackson County, Iowa, and settled on what was then the frontier. John passed away in 1862. Jim Brown learned his school lessons in a little log schoolhouse in Jackson County. At the age of 25 he married Margaret, settled on a farm in that county and farmed there until 1874. Then he came to Ida County and settled on wild land. He plowed the first furrow ever broken in the western part of the county in Battle Township. Wolves and deer were plenty all around. There was not a house between his farm and Judge John H. Moorehead’s land at the grove of trees where Moorehead had built a log cabin. This log cabin had the logs removed from the outside in the 1860s and the logs were replaced with boards. The post office was located at the Moorehead’s home and stage stop, and it was called “Ida.”...
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