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Slave Narrative of Mrs. Sarah Byrd

Person Interviewed: Sarah Byrd Location: Georgia Age: 95 An Interview On Slavery Obtained From Mrs. Sarah Byrd—ex-Slave Mrs. Sarah Byrd claims to be 95 years of age but the first impression one receives when looking at her is that of an old lady who is very active and possessing a sweet clear voice. When she speaks you can easily understand every word and besides this, each thought is well expressed. Often during the interview she would suddenly break out in a merry laugh as if her own thoughts amused her. Mrs. Sarah Byrd was born in Orange County Virginia the youngest of three children. During the early part of her childhood her family lived in Virginia her mother Judy Newman and father Sam Goodan each belonging to a different master. Later on the family became separated the father was sold to a family in East Tennessee and the mother and children were bought by Doctor Byrd in Augusta, Georgia. Here Mrs. Byrd remarked “Chile in them days so many families were broke up and some went one way and der others went t’other way; and you nebber seed them no more. Virginia wuz a reg’lar slave market.” Dr. Byrd owned a large plantation and raised such products as peas potatoes, cotton corn (etc). There were a large number of slaves. Mrs. Byrd was unable to give the exact number but remarked. “Oh Lordy Chile I nebber could tell just how many slaves that man had t’wuz too many uv em.” The size of the plantation required that the slaves be classified according to the kind of work each was...

Manahoac Indians

Manahoac Tribe: Meaning “They are very merry,” according to Tooker (1895), but this seems improbable. Also called: Mahocks, apparently a shortened form. Manahoac Connections. The Manaboac belonged to the Siouan linguistic family; their nearest connections were probably the Monacan, Moneton, and Tutelo. Manahoac Location. In northern Virginia between the falls of the rivers and the mountains east and west and the Potomac and North Anna Rivers north and south. Manahoac Subdivisions. Subtribes or tribes of the confederacy as far as known were the following: Hassinunga, on the headwaters of the Rappahannock River. Manahoac proper, according to Jefferson (1801), in Stafford and Spottsylvania Counties. Ontponea, in Orange County. Shackaconia, on the south bank of the Rappahannock River in Spottsylvania County. Stegaraki, on the Rapidan River in Orange County. Tanxnitania, on the north side of the upper Rappahannock River in Fauquier County. Tegninateo, in Culpeper County, at the head of the Rappahannock River. Whonkentia, in Fauquier County, near the head of the Rappahannock. Manahoac Villages: Mahaskahod, on the Rappahannock River, probably near Fredericksburg, is the only town known by name. Manahoac History. Traditional evidence points to an early home of the Manahoac people in the Ohio Valley. In 1608 John Smith discovered them in the location above given and learned that they with the Monacan but at war with the Powhatan Indians and the Iroquois (or perhaps rather the Susquehanna). After this they suddenly vanish from history under a certainly recognizable name, but there is good reason to believe that they were one of those tribes which settled near the falls of the James River in 1654 or 1656 and defeated...

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