Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

Biography of James Fleming

James Fleming, County Attorney for Peel, is a native of this Province, and was born in the Township of Vaughan, County of York, June 20, 1839. His parents, Robert and Marian (McMillan) Fleming were from Scotland. He was educated in common schools, the Normal School at Toronto, and in private; studied law with Henry B. Morphy, of Toronto; was called to the Bar in Easter term, 1866, and since that time has been in constant practice at Brampton. He does business in all the Courts, and from the start has had a liberal practice, his first experience at the Bar being gained in the defence of the Fenian prisoners at Toronto, in 1866-67. He is of the firm of Morphy and Fleming. Our subject was appointed Deputy Judge of the County in 1876, acting in the absence of Judge Scott, and resigned that office to accept that of County Attorney, tendered him in December, 1879. Mr. Fleming has had a good deal of experience in his profession for a man of his age. He has been Crown Counsel on various circuits, taking part in several important trials, and acquiting himself with great credit. He is a very forcible and impressive speaker, and has great influence with a jury. His reputation as a lawyer is fast becoming provincial. Mr. Fleming is a member of the High School Board, and has been for several years, and not only interests himself in educational matters, but in local enterprises generally, thoroughly identifying himself with the progress of the town. Mr. Fleming is a Liberal in politics, and being a positive man, and half-hearted...

Biography of William Scott M.D.

William Scott, with a single exception the oldest resident physician and surgeon in Oxford County, was born in Everingham, Yorkshire, England, November 27, 1820. His parents, Thomas and Dinah (Easingwood) Scott, came to Canada in 1830, and settled in the County of Oxford, our subject aiding to clear two farms in the county, one in Eastwood the other in East Oxford. He may almost be called a born physician, having at nine years of age a great fondness for medical studies; and while engaged in clearing and cultivating land, giving his leisure time to such studies, sometimes carrying a book into the field. At length he articled himself to Dr. Samuel J. Stratford of Woodstock, a member of the Royal College of Surgeons, England; passed an examination at the end of five years at the medical department of the University of Toronto (184S), and from that date has been in practice at Woodstock. About twenty years ago he received the honorary title of Doctor of Medicine from the Medical College at Castleton, VT. Dr. Scott has made a specialty of no branch of his art, yet early gave a great deal of attention to ‘midwifery, of which he has had at least 6,000 cases in a little less than thirty two years. He has a great deal of inventive talent, and a few surgical instruments of his invention, have been strongly commended by medical faculties. The last instrument from his skilful hands is an Ecraseur for removing uterine tumors; regarded by eminent surgeons as an improvement on anything of the kind heretofore in use. Dr. Scott was Surgeon in...

Biography of Prof. Nathaniel Burwash, A.M., S.T.D.

The subject of this biographical notice is a descendant of a United Empire Loyalist family that settled in Vermont, sometime before the American Revolution. Prior to that great historical event, his great grandfather was in the British navy. His grandfather, Adam Burwash, senior, moved from Vermont to Lower Canada, about 1790, and settled in the County of Argenteuil, where our subject was born July 25, 1839. His father, Adam Burwash, junior, was a volunteer in the rebellion of 1837-38, an uncle commanding the regiment, which was on garrison duty most of the time. When Nathaniel was ten years old the family removed to Upper Canada, settling on a farm near Cobourg. At thirteen years of age he was taken from the farm, and placed in the preparatory department of Victoria College, at which he was graduated in the Arts in 1859. After being tutor one year in this institution, Mr. Burwash entered the ministry of the Wesleyan Methodist Church, holding pastorates at Newburgh, Belleville, Toronto, and Hamilton, seven years in all; then spent one term in Yale College, New Haven, Conn., and returned to Cobourg to take the chair of Natural Science. That post he held for six years, graduating in Divinity meanwhile, 1871, at Garrett Biblican Institute, Evanston, Illinois. Five years later he received, from the same institution, the degree of Doctor of Sacred Theology. In 1873 Dr. Burwash was appointed Professor of Theology in Victoria College, and that position he still occupies. He is faithful in his work; is blest with a strong and tenacious memory, and accumulates large and rich stores of knowledge; combines lecturing and...

Biography of John G. Stevenson

John Gustavus Stevenson, Judge of the County of Haldimand, was born in the Township of Niagara, County of Lincoln, June 1, 1818, being a son of John A. Stevenson, a native of Dublin, and an officer of the 99th Foot, dying at “Oakwood,” Niagara, in 1832. The mother of our subject was Mary Allison, daughter of Rev. Robert Addison, who was established at Niagara in 1792, being a pioneer in his profession in Upper Canada. Judge Stevenson was educated chiefly at Upper Canada College, Toronto; studied law with Judge Campbell, of Niagara; was called to the Bar at Trinity term, 1840, and after practicing two years at Niagara, moved to St. Catharines, where he was engaged in his profession from 1843 to 1851, holding, part of that period, the office of Clerk of the United Counties of Lincoln, Welland and Haldimand, resigning this office in 1851, on his removal to Cayuga. Here he was appointed Clerk of the Peace, and in 1855 succeeded Judge Bernard Foley as County Judge of Haldimand. As a lawyer, our subject is sound and thorough, and when in practice was one of the fore most advocates in this part of the Province. As a Judge, he is very careful and accurate in making up his judgments, and in his addresses from the bench he is very impressive and often truly eloquent. In all the relations of life he is affable and courteous, and exhibits all the traits of the polished gentleman. His character and career honor the ermine. Judge Stevenson is a member of the Church of England, and has the reputation of having...

Biography ofJohn A. Orchard

John Allen Orchard, Clerk of the Division Court for the County of Welland, and a son of Thomas and Eliza Ann (Medway) Orchard, was born in Devonshire, England, March 2, 1815. Colonel Orchard, of the British army, was a cousin of his father, and John A. Medway, an officer in the British navy, was a brother of his mother. A large number of the Orchards are military and professional men. Young Orchard was educated in common and private schools, farmed with his father in the old country until 1835; then came to Upper Canada with the family, and after spending a few months in Toronto, located at Drummondville early in the year 1836, here making his home from that date. At first Mr. Orchard kept books for his father, who was a butcher, clerking also a while in the Pavilion hotel. In November, 1839, his father died, and the son took his place as a butcher for a year or two. The mother lived until September, 1868, dying in her 88th year. About 1841 Mr. Orchard commenced farming, renting at first, and followed that business until 1852, when he became an auctioneer, a business in which he is still engaged. On the demise of Hon. James Buchanan, Mr. Orchard sold off his property, and soon afterwards administered on the estate of Lieut. General Murray. For some time Mr. Orchard was an Insurance Agent; is now dealing more or less in real estate, and has been Clerk of the 4th Division Court, County of Welland, the last fourteen or fifteen years. Prior to taking this office he had been bailiff...

Biography of Hon. John O’Connor, Q.C.

The subject of this sketch is descended from two distinct families of the same name, of Kerry, Ireland; his parents being John and Mary O’Connor, though not related within known degrees of kinship. They immigrated to the United States in 1823, and settled in Boston, Mass., where our subject was born, January 21, 1824. When he was four years old the family removed to Upper Canada, settling in the County of Essex, in the extreme western part of what is now the Province of Ontario, where the son received his education in common, gram mar and private schools. He read law under W. D. Baby, of Sandwich, same county; attended several terms at the law school in Toronto: was sworn in as Attorney at law, in 1852; was called to the Bar, Hilary Term, in 1854, and practiced at Windsor and Sandwich, residing at the former place, till 1872, when he removed to Ottawa. Here he continues the practice of his profession, and as an advocate has no superior at the Ottawa Bar, and few equals in the eastern part of the Province. Mr. O’Connor was created a Queen’s Counsel in 1872, and is a member of the Michigan Bar; was at one period Reeve of Windsor; was warden of Essex for three years, being elected twice by the unanimous vote of the County Council; was for twelve consecutive years chair man of the Board of Education of Windsor; was sworn of the Privy Council, and was its President from July 2, 1872, to March 4, 1873, when he was appointed Minister of Inland Revenue. On the 1st of...

Biography of Daniel O’Connor

Among the earlier class of families that settled in Ottawa (then known as Bytown), was that of Daniel O’Connor, senior, who was born in Tipperary, Ireland, in 1796. He was possessed of considerable scholastic attainments, his parents, being in comfortable circumstances, having intended him for the clerical profession. Like many more of a literary turn of mind, Mr. O’Connor kept a journal through life, and being permitted to peruse it, we are in a position to give correctly his early life and history. Not feeling the necessary disposition to comply with his parents wishes, he was allowed to follow his own inclinations and took to mercantile pursuits, and in 1816 we find him embarked in the management of a large business in Clonmel, which he carried on with some success for over three years. At this time, to quote from his Journal: The South American Patriot service was blazoned forth through the public press. Several regiments were being raised in Ireland, England and Scotland, by Sir Gregor McGregor and General Devereux, in aid of General Bolivar, who was then at the head of a Republican Army endeavoring to shake off the Spanish yoke. The temptations held out were so alluring that thousands of fine young men were entrapped into this unfortunate service. Trade being at this time dull with me, being subject to enormous rent, and being in the prime of youth, enjoying good health, and rather of an ambitious disposition, I caught the infectious mania also. I gave up my business on the 20th June, 1819, started for Dublin and purchased a commission as Lieutenant in the first...

Biography of Lieut. Col. Hon. Charles E. Panet

Charles Eugene Panet, Deputy of the Minister of Militia and Defense, is descended from an old Canadian family, his great grandfather coming from France and settling in Lower Canada, more than a century ago, and acting as the first Speaker of the Lower Canada House of Commons, serving for twenty three years. The subject of this sketch is the son of Philip Panet, late Judge of the Court of Queen’s Bench, Lower Canada, and was born in Quebec, November 17, 1830. The maiden name of his mother was Luce Casgrain, a daughter of the Seigneur of La Bouteillerie, also an old French family. He was educated in the Quebec Seminary, and the Jesuit College at Georgetown, D. C. studied law in his native city with Hon. T. T. Taschereau, late of the Supreme Court; was called to the Bar in 1854, and practiced three years in Quebec. Mr. Panet was sole coroner for the City and District of Quebec for fourteen years one of the largest Districts in Lower...

Biography of Edward McGillivray

Edward McGillivray is a son of Donald McGillivray, a farmer, who came from Invernessshire, Scotland, in 1793, and settled in the County of Glengarry, where Edward was born September 15, 1815. His mother was Catharine Campbell, a Highlander. The subject of this notice is one of the leading merchants of Ottawa; received a very plain education in a country school, but made good use of his time, and early became quite proficient in figures, the Mathematics being a favorite study with him. In youth he profitably employed his leisure time when out of school, and acquired a fair knowledge of the branches necessary for the prosecution of business. When about sixteen years of age, with ten pence in coppers in his pocket, he entered a store at L’Orignal, County of Prescott; there served a four years apprenticeship at the mercantile trade; in 1835 came to Ottawa and clerked one year for Wells and McCrea, and then commenced business for himself at the same place, Nos. 333-335 Wellington Street, where he has traded since the autumn of 1836. At first he dealt in dry goods and groceries, and of late years in groceries and provisions only, wholesaling since about 1873. He always has a close oversight of his business, which he manages with prudence and success. For a few years past it has averaged about 30,000 per month. Mr. McGillivray is a Conservative in politics, and has as little to do with offices as possible, consistent with his duties as a citizen. He served eight years in the City Council of Ottawa, and was the first Mayor elected in 1858,...

Biography of John Dewar

John Dewar, County Attorney and Clerk of the Peace, is a son of John and Emily (Knight) Dewar, both being Perthshire, Scotland, families. He was born in that County August 22, 1829, and before he was a year old the family immigrated to Canada, and settled on a farm in the Township of Esquesing, four miles from Milton. The subject of this sketch was educated in the common and grammar schools, and Franklin College, New Athens, Ohio, where he spent a few term; studied law in Toronto with John McNab, at one time County Attorney, and Angus Morrison, ex-Mayor of Toronto, and formerly a member of the Canadian Assembly; was admitted as an Attorney at Michaelmas term, 1858; called to the Bar at Easter term the next year, and has worn a barrister’s gown at Milton, for nearly twenty-one years. During the earlier half of this period he was Superintendent of Town Schools; has since been a School Trustee, and is Chairman of the Public School Board. He was for several years Secretary of the Reform Association for Halton, and is and has been for a number of years, President of the Milton Mechanics Institute. Mr. Dewar was appointed to his present offices of County Attorney and Clerk of the Peace, 21st of August, 1868. He is also Deputy County Judge, and has had occasion to act once or twice in the absence of Judge Miller. As a Crown officer. he is just and painstaking; as a lawyer, able, reliable and thoroughly conscientious, endeavoring to settle differences between parties, rather than to make costs by bringing suits. He belongs...
Page 3 of 5712345678910...2030...Last »

Pin It on Pinterest