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Biography of Walter A. Rosenfield

Walter A. Rosenfield, the eldest son of Morris and Julia E. Rosenfield, was born in Rock Island, June 13, 1877. The sketch of his father and of the history of the Rosenfield family precedes this. After completing the Rock Island public schools, Mr. Rosenfield entered St. John’s Military School at Manlius, New York, and graduated from that school. In 1898 the lingering and hopeless illness of his father, Morris Rosenfield, having made it impossible for him to longer assume the duties devolving upon the president of an industry like the Moline Wagon Company, his son, our subject, was elected to that office, which position he still holds. Called to assume the guiding power of a great and growing industry when he had barely attained his majority, and at an age when most young men of his station are still pursuing their collegiate course, Mr. Rosenfield has displayed splendid ability in handling the large affairs that constantly demanded his attention. Under his management the plant has been enlarged and the output increased. Several new buildings have been added until the capacity of the factory is almost doubled. Like his father, Walter A. Rosenfield, is a Republican, and although never seeking any political office for himself he takes an active interest in the trend of political affairs. He makes his home at the family residence at the head of Eighteenth Street in Rock Island, a handsome brick and sandstone edifice, and the handsomest home in the city. Mr. Rosenfield is a young man to whom large opportunities have been given to demonstrate what manner of man he is, and he has...

Biography of George H. Williams

Judge Williams, alone among the citizens of Oregon, has had the distinction of occupying a place in the highest councils of the nation-in the cabinet of a president. He was also regarded by President Grant as the man most fit and able to hold the position of Chief Justice of the United States. The bitter struggle following his nomination to this supreme position is well remembered for the sectional feeling displayed and the dissent of certain members of the senate which led the Judge to withdraw his name. It is not the intention, however, to recall the personal contests of the past they have been long forgotten and forgiven but to remind the reader that it was upon an arena no less great than the nation that Judge Williams has passed the most intense years of his life, and that it was as one of a group of men the first among Americans a company composing the “Great Round Table” in the most eventful years of our national history that he has been accustomed to move. The people of Oregon have reason to feel a justifiable pride in his career, and to appreciate more strongly the ties that unite them to the national life. Not wishing to make comparisons as to the value of the services of the able men who have represented the State of Oregon at Washington, and even while remembering the eloquent Baker and the noble and sagacious Nesmith, still it must in justice be admitted that Judge Williams in no place to which he was called, however exalted, ever fell short of its high requirements,...

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