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Biographical Sketch of Charles W. Goodlander

Charles W. Goodlander was an able and large hearted business man, and among other tributes to his benevolence is the Home for Children which he founded at Fort Scott. He was a Pennsylvanian of English-Quaker ancestry, born at Milton, April 25, 1834. He obtained a partial high school education and mastered and followed the carpenter’s trade in Ponnsylvania, Maryland, Indiana, Illinois and Missouri, before deciding to venture west of the Mississippi in his search for a location. Finally, in April, 1857, he arrived at Fort Scott, the first passenger to come from Kansas City by stage coach. Mr. Goodlander at once established himself at that point as a contractor and builder, in which line he continued with success for twelve years. Subsequently he became interested in the lumber trade, a large brick yard and other enterprises. The panie of 1873 much reduced the value of his properties, and in 1876 his mill and elevator were almost destroyed by a boiler explosion. He then retrieved his fortune by returning to his old business of building and contrasting, bought back his mill property and suffered a heavy loss by fire in 1887. The mill was rebuilt. For some time he was also president of the Citizens’ National Bank, and operated the Goodlandor Hotel. He invested in grain elevators, the manufacture of yellow pine and a variety of other enterprises. In 1901 he purchased the old home of his father-in-law, Col. H. T. Wilson, and converted it into the Goodlander Home for Children. This useful institution is open to dependent children of Fort Scott and vienity, and, in exceptional cases, to older...

Saponi Indians

Saponi Tribe: Evidently a corruption of Monasiccapano or Monasukapanough, which, as shown by Bushnell, is probably derived in part from a native term “moni seep” signifying “shallow water.” Paanese is a corruption and in no way connected with the word “Pawnee.” Saponi Connections. The Saponi belonged to the Siouan linguistic family, their nearest relations being the Tutelo. Saponi Location. The earliest known location of the Saponi has been identified by Bushnell (1930) with high probability with “an extensive village site on the banks of the Rivanna, in Albemarle County, directly north of the University of Virginia and about one-half mile up the river from the bridge of the Southern Railway.” This was their location when, if ever, they formed a part of the Monacan Confederacy. (See also North Carolina, New York, and Pennsylvania.) Saponi Villages. The principal Saponi settlement usually bore the same name as the tribe or, at least, it has survived to us under that name. In 1670 Lederer reports another which he visited called Pintahae, situated not far from the main Saponi town after it had been removed to Otter Creek, southwest of the present Lynchburg (Lederer, 1912), but this was probably the Nahyssan town. Saponi History As first pointed out by Mooney (1895), the Saponi tribe is identical with the Monasukapanough which appears on Smith’s map as though it were a town of the Monacan and may in fact have been such. Before 1670, and probably between 1650 and 1660, they moved to the southwest and probably settled on Otter Creek, as above indicated. In 1670 they were visited by Lederer in their new home...

Biography of S. E. Leinbach

S. E. Leinbach. Fifty years have passed since Mr. Leinbach became a resident of Kansas. He arrived in Pottawatomie County as a pioneer not long after the close of the Civil war, in which he had played a gallant part as a Union soldier. The war was the first great event in his life and his settlement in Kansas the second. Mr. Leinbach developed a homestead and had since acquired a large body of the fertile and valuable soil of Pottawatomie County. He is now living at Onaga and had been a public spirited factor in the progress of that community since the pioneer spoeh. Mr. Leimbach’s ancestors came out of Germany and settled in Pennsylvania as early as 1716. Since early times the family lived in Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, where S. E. Leinbach was born April 7, 1841, and where his father, Daniel Leinbach, was born in April, 1809. Daniel Leinbach married ‘Lydia Stitzel, also of German ancestry. She was bora in Northumberland County in 1811. Both of them died in the same year, 1840, victims of typhoid fever. Daniel Leinbach was a miller by trade and occupation, and owned a flour mill at McEwensville, Pennsylvania. He was a democrat and he and his wife were members of the German Reformed Church. S. E. Leinbach was the fifth in a family of five children, and he and all his brothers were Union soldiers. The oldest, Henry, enlisted and served in a Pemnsylvania regiment, from there moved out to Iowa, and finally to South Dakota, and after many years as a farmer he died in the latter state at...

Biographical Sketch of John M. Hutchison

John M. Hutchison, druggist, was born in Northumberland County, Pa., March 13, 1842, moved to Stephenson County, Ill., came to Jewell County in 1871, and took a homestead. Engaged in the drug business in July, 1873. Was elected to the Kansas State Legislature in 1878. He is a member of the A. O. U. W., and the Odd Fellows lodges. He was married March 22, 1875, in Jewell City, Kan., to Miss Temperance Jordan. They have one child – Mary Leonora, born May 14,...

Biographical Sketch of Harvey Edward Hackenberg

Hackenberg, Harvey Edward; manufacturer; born, Northumberland, Pa., March 8, 1864; son of Albert and Maria Brouse Hackenberg; public and high school education; married, Cleveland, June 18, 1903, Addie May Lawrence; one son, Edward Hackenberg, three years old; Republican in politics; 1881, clerk Tuttle, Masters & Co., iron ore merchants; 1883-1888, clerk The Bouton Carbon Co.; 1888-1899, sec’y The National Carbon Co. of Ohio; 1899-1911, treas. National Carbon Co. of Ohio and New Jersey; 1912, vice. pres., sec’y and treas. National Carbon Co. of New Jersey; sec’y, treas., vice pres. and director The National Carbon Co.; director, sec’y and treas. The Lakewood Mnfg. Co.; director and sec’y The Dow Chemical Co.; member Cleveland Engineering Society; member district committee, West Side Associated Charities; member Lakewood Baptist Church; trustee City Rescue Mission; member The Jovian Order, Cleveland Chamber of Commerce, and Board of Industry, and The Lakewood Chamber of Commerce, Union, Tippecanoe and Lakewood Tennis Clubs. Recreation:...

Biography of Dr. William Plunkett

Esther, daughter of John Harris, married Dr. William Plunkett, who was born in Ireland of noble family. In personal appearance he is described as of large stature, great muscular development and strength, while an imperious disposition was among his distinguishing mental traits. This is attested by several occurrences in his career which yet retain a place in the traditions of the locality which he afterward lived in Pennsylvania. On one occasion with several boon companions, he was engaged in some hilarious proceedings at an Irish inn. The adjoining room was occupied by an English nobleman, who had a curious and valuable watch, which he sent to Plunkett with a wager that he could not tell the time by it. Dr. Plunkett put the watch in his pocket and sent a message to the Englishman that he should call upon him in person if he wished to know the time, but the Englishman never called and it is said that Plunkett kept the watch to the end of his life. Afterward he became involved in an assault on an English officer who was seriously injured and he was smuggled on board a vessel in a barrel or hogshead and thus came to America. He located at Carlisle, Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, then on the western frontier, and he lived there during the French and Indian war, in which he was commissioned a lieutenant of the Fort Augusta Regiment of Northumberland county, and for his services received a grant of several hundred acres of land on the west branch of the Susquehanna river. To his property he gave the name of Soldiers’...

Saponi Tribe

Saponi Indians. One of the eastern Siouan tribes, formerly living in North Carolina and Virginia, but now extinct. The tribal name was occasionally applied to the whole group of Ft Christanna tribes, also occasionally included under Tutelo. That this tribe belonged to the Siouan stock has been placed beyond doubt by the investigations of Hale and Mooney. Their language appears to have been the same as the Tutelo to the extent that the people of the two tribes could readily understand each other. Mooney has shown that the few Saponi words recorded are Siouan. Lederer mentions a war in which the Saponi seem to have been engaged with the Virginia settlers as early as 1654-56, the time of the attack by the Cherokee, probably in alliance with them. The first positive notice is by Lederer (1670), who informs us that he stopped a few days at Sapon, a town of the Tutelo confederacy, situated on a tributary of the upper Roanoke. This village was apparently on Otter river, southwest of Lynchburg, Virginia. Pintahae is mentioned also as another of their villages near by. It is evident that the Saponi and Tutelo were living at that time in close and apparently confederated relation. In 1671 they were visited by Thomas Batts and others accompanied by two Indian guides. After traveling nearly due west from the mouth of the Appomattox about 140 miles, they came to Sapong, or Saponys, town. Having been harassed by the Iroquois in this locality, the Saponi and Tutelo at a later date removed to the junction of Staunton and Dan rivers, where they settled near the...

Oneida Chief Shikellamy

With To-re-wa-wa-kon ‘Paul Wallace’ as a guide, the Mohawks headed over a road, that once was an Indian trail, toward the north. Their route was over a beautiful country of hills and valleys. With their friend they soon reached the beautiful Susquehanna River Valley. At Sunbury, Pa. they visited the site of the cabin of old Chief Shikellamy. It was here that the great Oneida chief, the overseer of Vice-Gerent of the Delaware and other refugee Indians of the region lived. This was where his village, Shamokin, was located and where be spent most of his time from 1728 to 1748. Here is where the great chief died and was buried. Near here the Mohawks saw two monuments erected to this great Indian. The inscription on one of the monuments was as follows: “Erected as a memorial to Shikellamy, also Swataney, “Our Enlightener”, the representative of the Six Nations, in this province. First sent to Shamokin ‘Sunbury’ in 1728. Appointed Vice-Gerent in 1745, died Dec. 6, 1748. He was buried near this spot. This diplomat and statesman was a firm friend of the Province of Pennsylvania – erected by Augusta Chapter D. A. R. in cooperation with Pennsylvania Historical Commission, June 1915.” The other monument bore the following inscription : “SHIKELLAMY-Oneida Chief and overseer or Vice-Gerent of the Six Nations, asserting Iroquois dominion over conquered Delaware and other tribes. He lived at Shamokin Indian Town, Sunbury, from about 1728 until his death, 1748-said to be buried near here.” Shikellamy’s real name was Ongwaterohiathe. ‘It has caused the sky to be bright for us’. This famous Oneida chief has also...
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