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Slave Narrative of Sam and Louisa Everett

Sam and Louisa Everett, 86 and 90 years of age respectively, have weathered together some of the worst experiences of slavery, and as they look back over the years, can relate these experiences as clearly as if they had happened only yesterday. Both were born near Norfolk, Virginia and sold as slaves several times on nearby plantations. It was on the plantation of “Big Jim” McClain that they met as slave-children and departed after Emancipation to live the lives of free people. Sam was the son of Peter and Betsy Everett, field hands who spent long back-breaking hours in the cotton fields and came home at nightfall to cultivate their small garden. They lived in constant fear that their master would confiscate most of their vegetables; he so often did. Louisa remembers little about her parents and thinks that she was sold at an early age to a separate master. Her name as nearly as she could remember was Norfolk Virginia. Everyone called her “Nor.” It was not until after she was freed and had sent her children to school that she changed her name to Louisa. Sam and Norfolk spent part of their childhood on the plantation of “Big Jim” who was very cruel; often he would whip his slaves into insensibility for minor offences. He sometimes hung them up by their thumbs whenever they were caught attempting to escape – “er fer no reason atall.” On this plantation were more than 100 slaves who were mated indiscriminately and without any regard for family unions. If their master thought that a certain man and woman might have strong,...

Biographical Sketch of Joseph McFarland

Joseph McFarland, of Ireland, came to America before the revolution, and settled at Norfolk, Va. He joined the American army when the war broke out, and was killed in battle. He left a widow and one son, Robert, who settled in Madison Co., Ky., where he married Rhoda Quick, and they had Sarah, Joseph, and Rachel. Mr. McFarland’s first wife died, and he subsequently married Eva Farmer, of Virginia, by whom he had-Eleanor, Lucinda, Elizabeth, Permelia, Eliza, and Robert. Joseph McFarland settled in Montgomery County in 1825. He married. Polly Cundiff. Lucinda married James McGarvin, of Montgomery County. Eliza married Jonathan G....

Biographical Sketch of David Baker

David Baker, son of Robert Baker, of England, married Mary Anderson, in November, 1756, and settled in Norfolk, Va. They had Elizabeth, Mary, Benjamin, David, Robert, Sarah, Dempsey, Thomas, and James. David was born in November, 1763. He married Judith Johnson, and they had-Sylvester, Thomas J., and John. Sylvester, who was born in 1791, married the widow of John Johnson, whose maiden name was Elsey Ward, and settled in Montgomery Co., Mo., in 1820. His children were-Judith, David W., Sylvester, Jr., William M., and John F. Capt. John Baker was born in 1795. He married Lizzie Johnson, and settled in Montgomery County in 1820. They had-Sylvester C., Elsey A., Robert W., John J., Mary K., Judith M., Margaret E., and Dicey B. V. Capt. Baker built a water mill on Loutre creek, and a rather singular circumstance happened to it one day. The mill was running at full speed, with a heavy head of water on, when the wheel suddenly blocked .and the machinery stopped with a jar and crash that shook the mill to its foundation. Upon examining the wheel a large cat-fish was found in it. The fish was taken out, a handspike run through its gills, and two tall Negroes hoisted it on their shoulders and carried it to the house; and it was so long that its tail dragged on the ground. This is a considerable fish story, but it is...

Slave Narrative of Sarah Harris

Interviewer: Mary A. Hicks Person Interviewed: Sarah Harris Date of Interview: May 19, 1937 Location: North Carolina Date of Birth: April 1861 Interviewed May 19, 1937. Sarah Harris is my name. I wuz borned April 1861, on the plantation of Master John William Walton. My father wuz name Frank Walton and my mother wuz name Flora Walton. My brothers wuz name Lang and Johnny. My sisters: Hannah, Mary, Ellen, Violet and Annie. My grandmother wuz name Ellen Walton. She wuz 104 years old when she died. My mother wuz 103 years old when she died; she has been dead 3 years. She died in October, 3 years this pas’ October. I ‘member seeing the Yankees. I wuz not afraid of ’em, I thought dey were the prettiest blue mens I had ever seed. I can see how de chickens and guineas flew and run from ’em. De Yankees killed ’em and give part of ’em to the colored folks. Most of de white folks had run off and hid. I can’t read and write. I nebber had no chance. De Yankees had their camps along the Fayetteville road. Dey called us Dinah, Sam, and other names. Dey later had de place dey call de bureau. When we left de white folks we had nothing to eat. De niggers wait there at de bureau and they give ’em hard tack, white potatoes, and saltpeter meat. Our white folks give us good things to eat, and I cried every day at 12 o’clock to go home. Yes, I wanted to go back to my white folks; they were good to us....

Slave Narrative of Sarah Harris

Interviewer: Mary A. Hicks Person Interviewed: Sarah Harris Date of Interview: May 19, 1937 Location: North Carolina Date of Birth: April 1861 Age: 76 Sarah Harris is my name. I wuz borned April 1861, on the plantation of Master John William Walton. My father wuz name Frank Walton and my mother wuz name Flora Walton. My brothers wuz name Lang and Johnny. My sisters: Hannah, Mary, Ellen, Violet and Annie. My grandmother wuz name Ellen Walton. She wuz 104 years old when she died. My mother wuz 103 years old when she died; she has been dead 3 years. She died in October, 3 years this pas’ October. I ‘member seeing the Yankees. I wuz not afraid of ’em, I thought dey were the prettiest blue mens I had ever seed. I can see how de chickens and guineas flew and run from ’em. De Yankees killed ’em and give part of ’em to the colored folks. Most of de white folks had run off and hid. I can’t read and write. I nebber had no chance. De Yankees had their camps along the Fayetteville road. Dey called us Dinah, Sam, and other names. Dey later had de place dey call de bureau. When we left de white folks we had nothing to eat. De niggers wait there at de bureau and they give ’em hard tack, white potatoes, and saltpeter meat. Our white folks give us good things to eat, and I cried every day at 12 o’clock to go home. Yes, I wanted to go back to my white folks; they were good to us. I would...

Biography of John M. Mason

John M. Mason, a well-known farmer of the Fifteenth District, was born October 22, 1819, in North Carolina, and came to Smith (now Dekalb) County in 1827. He was the seventh of thirteen children born to Wiley and Nancy (Bensy) Mason. The father was born January 31, 1785, in Virginia. He served in the war of 1812, and was mustered out at the close of the war at Norfolk, Virginia. He moved to Caswell County, N. C., and from there to Smith County in 1827. He was a man of considerable intelligence, well versed in the Bible, in which he took a deep interest. He was also thoroughly posted on all political subjects. His death occurred in 1840. His father was a native of Whales. Mrs. Nancy Mason was born October 4, 1783, and died in North Carolina. Our subject had but limited educational advantages until after his majority. He attended the common schools of the county. He worked as an overseer and manager for several years. He then farmed on rented land until he was able to purchase forty-two acres near Riddleton, Smith County. From time to time he has added to his place, and now owns 400 acres, well cultivated and improved, and a house and lot in Smithville. For nine years he has been magistrate, and trustee of the Earl Academy two years. From 1859 to 1880 he was engaged in the tanning business, also in general merchandising, always meeting with success. He is a life-long Democrat; cast his first presidential vote for Martin Van Buren. In 1849 he married miss Eliza, the youngest of six...

Biography of Edward P. Pitts, M. D.

Edward P. Pitts, M. D.,is a well known specialist at Atchison, where he had practiced as an eye, ear, nose and throat physician and surgeon for fifteen years. He is a native of Virginia and his ancestry for several generations lived in that part of the South. He was born in Northampton County, Virginia, October 13, 1880. This branch of the Pitts family came out of England and settled in Maryland in Colonial times. Doctor Pitts’ grandfather, Edward P. Pitts, was born in Somerset County, Maryland, in 1821, and became a prominent lawyer. He lived at Norfolk, Virginia, where he died in 1881, and for about thirty years had been judge of the Circuit Court. Doctor Pitts’ father, Edward D. Pitts, was also a prominent lawyer. He was born in Northampton County in 1849, was reared and married there, and graduated in law from the University of Virginia. For a time he practiced at Eastville in Northampton County, but subsequently took up practice at Norfolk, where he was active in his profession until his death in 1909. In early manhood he served as clerk of the court at Eastville. He was a democrat, a member of the Episcopal Church, and was affiliated with the Masonic order. Edward D. Pitts married Emory W. West, who was born in Northampton County, Virginia, in 1850 and is now living at Norfolk in that state. Her children were: Mary, wife of Frank K. Clements, a hotel proprietor at Petersburg, Virginia; Charles D., in the plumbing business at Norfolk; Doctor Pitts; Mrs. Mildred Rogers, whose husband had charge of the branch of the Morris...

Darius Webb Todd of Norfolk VA

Darius Webb Todd7, (Elnathan6, John5, John4, John3, John2, Christopher1) born April 11, 1806, died Sept. 29, 1879, at Norfolk, Virginia, married July 14, 1829, at Norwalk, Connecticut, Margaret Comstock, who died Nov. 8, 1840. Children: 1124. Sarah E. Todd, b. Jan. 19, 1830. 1125. Hanford Comstock Todd, born Feb. 17, 1832. 1126. John W. Todd, b. April 5, 1834. 1127. Darius Webb Todd, b. May 24, 1836. 1128. Theodore Todd, b. March 22, 1838. 1129. Margaret C. Todd, born Aug. 1, 1840, died May 21, 1899, married Oct. 2, 1867, William Paddock Coffin, who was born Sept. 10, 1832. Children: I. Charles Carlton, b. Oct. 29, 1868, d. March 30, 1883. II. Louise, b. Jan. 31, 1872, d. Dec. 14, 1891. III. Helen, b. Jan. 19, 1876, m. June 20, 1908,(???) Ober; they reside in Dillon, Montana. No children. IV. Mark Todd, b. June 1, 1879, unmarried; lives in Mankato,...

Malcolm Howard Todd of Norfolk VA

Malcolm Howard Todd9, (George B.8, Frederick P.7, Thomas J.6, Caleb5, Gideon4, Gideon3, Michael2, Christopher1) born May 9, 1898, in Norfolk, Va., married Jan. 4, 1919, Mary Lucile Braithwaite. Child: 2792a. Malcolm Howard, b. Dec. 1, 1919, in Norfolk,...

George B. Todd of Norfolk VA

George B. Todd8, (Frederick P.7, Thomas J.6, Caleb5, Gideon4, Gideon3, Michael2, Christopher1) born Oct. 24, 1867 in Plattsmouth, Neb., went with his parents when they moved to Jamestown, N. Y., married Sept. 18, 1889, in Hampton, Va., M. Rosa Hart, who was born Dec. 4, 1869. In 1920 they were living in Norfolk, Va., where he was a merchant dealing in all kinds of farm machinery, motor trucks, engines, electric light plants, water systems etc. Children: 2424. Allene Ford, b. Sept. 17, 1890, in Jamestown, N. Y., m. June, 1917, Cecil W. Tucker. 2425. George B., b. March 27, 1892, d. Dec. 26, 1894. 2426. Clarence Hart, b. July 14, 1893. *2427. Malcom Howard, b. May 9,...

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