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Old Cemetery, Newton County, Georgia

Dr. J M Cody 1823 – 1864 Amanda Cody, wife of Dr. J M Cody 1-6-1832 1-21-1858 Mrs. Jane Luckie 5/22/1777 – 5/17/1856 Charles G Luckie 10/23/1844 – 8/6/1845 Capt. Lorenzo Luckie 5-27-1836(or 1838) 7/30/1884 Robert Pullen 7/6/1756 – 1/12/1851 William Brown 1817 -1876 Ransom Worrill Elizabeth Kennan 9/6/1786 – 7/18/1857 Richard Kennan 2/13/1782 – 7/20/1855 Xenephan Kennan 2/20/ 1818 – 5/4/1854 Dr. Jasper Bryan 6/18/1804 – 11/7/1863 Rev. Samuel Patillo 6/25/1771 – 6/4/1844 Girard Camp 12/5/1794 – 12/5/1861 Eliza Buckner Wife of W D Luckie, Sr 10/13/1807 – 5/11/1856 W D Luckie 9/2/1800 – 1/2/1870 Martha Lacy Camp 10/7/1796 – 7/8/1878 Rev. Charles H Sanders 2/27/1796 – 8/6/1851 Ophelia J Hicks Wife of John N Hicks-daughter of C H Sanders 8/19/1827 – 9/14/1852 Ransom Worrill 5/13/1786 – 11/17/1832 Robert S Norton died 12/19/1850 age 50 Rev. Andrew Hamill 1796 – 1835 Lawrence Baker 3/23/1804 – 4/9/1857 McAllan Batts 12/15/1806 – 3/17/1839 Mrs. SarahSanders 2/27/1808 – 6/18/1866 William M Davis 3/19/1823 – 9/16/1854 Richard King 1/15/1815 – 3/20/1874 Jane Roselin Wife of R. King 2/20/1830 – 11/29/1881 B F McCay 4/11/1817 – 1/16/1863 Catherine Addie King 3/15/1843 –...

Slave Narrative of Melissa (Lowe) Barden

Interviewer: Frank M. Smith Person Interviewed: Melissa (Lowe) Barden Location: Youngstown, Ohio Place of Birth: Chattooga County, Georgia Age: 80-90 Place of Residence: 1671 Jacobs Road Ex-Slaves Mahoning County, District #5 Youngstown, Ohio The Story of MRS. MELISSA (LOWE) BARDEN, Youngstown, Ohio. Mrs. Melissa (Lowe) Barden of 1671 Jacobs Road, was “bred and born” on the plantation of David Lowe, near Summersville, Georgia, Chattooga County, and when asked how old she was said “I’s way up yonder somewheres maybe 80 or 90 years.” Melissa assumed her master’s name Lowe, and says he was very good to her and that she loved him. Only once did she feel ill towards him and that was when he sold her mother. She and her sister were left alone. Later he gave her sister and several other slaves to his newly married daughter as a wedding present. This sister was sold and re-sold and when the slaves were given their freedom her mother came to claim her children, but Melissa was the only one of the four she could find. Her mother took her to a plantation in Newton County, where they worked until coming north. The mother died here and Melissa married a man named Barden. Melissa says she was very happy on the plantation where they danced and sang folk songs of the South, such as “Sho’ Fly Go ‘Way From Me”, and others after their days work was done. When asked if she objected to having her picture taken she said, “all right, but don’t you-all poke fun at me because I am just as God made me.” Melissa lives...

Slave Narrative of Mrs. Melissa (Lowe) Barden

Interviewer: Frank M. Smith Person Interviewed: Melissa (Lowe) Barden Location: Youngstown, Ohio Place of Residence: 1671 Jacobs Road Mrs. Melissa (Lowe) Barden of 1671 Jacobs Road, was “bred and born” on the plantation of David Lowe, near Summersville, Georgia, Chattooga County, and when asked how old she was said “I’s way up yonder somewheres maybe 80 or 90 years.” Melissa assumed her master’s name Lowe, and says he was very good to her and that she loved him. Only once did she feel ill towards him and that was when he sold her mother. She and her sister were left alone. Later he gave her sister and several other slaves to his newly married daughter as a wedding present. This sister was sold and re-sold and when the slaves were given their freedom her mother came to claim her children, but Melissa was the only one of the four she could find. Her mother took her to a plantation in Newton County, where they worked until coming north. The mother died here and Melissa married a man named Barden. Melissa says she was very happy on the plantation where they danced and sang folk songs of the South, such as “Sho’ Fly Go ‘Way From Me”, and others after their days work was done. When asked if she objected to having her picture taken she said, “all right, but don’t you-all poke fun at me because I am just as God made me.” Melissa lives with her daughter, Nany Hardie, in a neat bungalow on the Sharon Line, a Negro district. Melissa’s health is good with the exception of...

Native American History of Newton County, Georgia

Newton County located in northern Georgia and is part of the Atlanta Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area (SMSA.) Its name honors Sgt. John Newton, a hero of the American Revolution. The county seat is Covington. Newton County is bordered on the north by Walton County. Morgan County adjoins it on the east while Jasper County adjoins it on the Southeast. Butts County is located to the south. Henry County forms the southwestern border, while Rockdale County forms the northwest border. Geology and hydrology Newton County was located in the Piedmont geological region, which is characterized by underlying rock strata of igneous and metamorphicized igneous rock. The Piedmont’s terrain generally consists of rolling hills and stream valleys with some areas being almost flat plains. There are few permanent wetlands paralleling the streams. The top soils are thin over most hills and steep slopes, while much deeper near streams and in the plains. Newton County was immediately south of the old Cotton Line, which marked the northern limit of cotton species grown before the Civil War. Cotton was the most important agricultural product before the Civil War, but there were few large plantations. The landscape varies from being flat to moderately hilly. . Newton County is drained by the Alcovy, Yellow and South Rivers. These rivers join at the southern end of the county to form the Ocmulgee River. These small rivers were deep enough to support large Native American canoes except where shoals were located, such as at Factory Shoals near Covington. The original name of the Alcovy River was Ulcofauhatchee until the 20th century. That river name is the anglicized...

Biography of Chester Lee Hill, M.D.

The medical fraternity of Haskell finds a prominent representative in Dr. Chester Lee Hill, who is an exponent of all that is highest, best and most advanced in the, practice of medicine and surgery, and of all that is most worthy and honorable in his relations toward his fellowmen. He was born in Canton, Cherokee county, Georgia, May 1, 1876, and is a son of Andrew H. and Maria (Phillips) Hill, the former a native of Virginia and the latter of South Carolina. The father was one of the early planters of Georgia, becoming the owner of fourteen hundred acres of land, and he also operated saw and flour mills, a cotton gin and a wool carder. He was a veteran of the Civil war, serving throughout the entire period of hostilities as a first lieutenant in the Confederate army. He participated in many heavy engagements, being present at the battles of Lookout Mountain and Missionary Ridge and being wounded in action. His business interests were wisely and successfully managed and he passed away in August, 1912, at the age of seventy-nine, while the mother’s demise had occurred in November, 1907, when she was seventy-four years of age. In the acquirement of an education Dr. Hill attended the grammar and high schools of Ball Ground, Georgia, and Emory College at Oxford, that state, after which he devoted two years to teaching, becoming principal of the Sharpe Mountain high school. He then entered the old University of Nashville, Tennessee, where he spent two terms as a medical student, completing his professional course in Grant University at Chattanooga, Tennessee, from which...

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