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Biography of C. C. Hudson

C. C. HUDSON. Many of the most active and enterprising residents of Newton County are natives of the same, and have here spent the greater part of their lives. In them we find men of true loyalty to the interests of this part of the State who understand as it were by instinct the needs, social and industrial, of this vicinity, and who have a thorough knowledge of its resources. They are, therefore, better adapted to succeed here than a stranger could be and are probably without exception warmly devoted to the prosperity of their native place. Mr. C. C. Hudson, a successful farmer and stockraiser of Jackson Township, Newton County, Arkansas, was born in this county, in 1858, and is a son of Samuel and Nancy (Billah) Hudson, both natives of Tennessee, the former born about 1811, and the later in 1818. When about seven years of age the father was brought by his parents to Lawrence County, Arkansas, and he there grew to mature years, married and made his home until 1832, when he came to what is now Newton County, Arkansas He cut his way through the unbroken forest, then inhabited by Indians and wild animals, and located on the creek that bears his name, three miles above Jasper, where he was the first white settler. He became one of the wealthiest and best known citizens of the county, and followed farming and stockraising exclusively until 1860, when he built a grist mill above Mount Parthenon. This he operated until 1873, when he built a mill where Matlock’s Mill now stands, and conducted this for eight...

Biography of William Harrison Cecil

WILLIAM HARRISON CECIL, is a dry goods merchant in Harrison, Arkansas (July 9, 1894), and was born in Newton County, Arkansas, on July 9, 1854. His parents were Riley and Sarah J. (Harrison) Cecil, the former born in Arkansas July IO, 1829, the latter in Tennessee, April 11, 1835. Riley was a son of Solomon Cecil, who was born in Tennessee in 1786, and who was married to Sally Hatfield, in Tennessee, in 1814. There were born to them seven sons and two daughters, Riley being the fifth child. Two sons and one daughter are now living in Visalia, Cal. Solomon Cecil moved to Arkansas in 1827, and settled in Newton County, on what is now known as Cecil Fork of Buffalo River, he being among the first settlers in this part of the country. At that time there were no settlers nearer than what is now called Yellville, then called Shawnee Town, being forty miles away, and this was where he had to do his milling. On Buffalo River the cane grew very thick and tall, growing as high as fifteen to twenty feet, on which horses and cattle would live throughout the winter without any other food; hogs would live there on the mast. He had to raise only corn and vegetables for the use of the family, wheat not being raised, as there were no wheat mills. Honey was plentiful in the woods, as was also game, such as bears, deer and turkeys, and his family were never without bear meat, venison and turkey. There were also wolves, panthers, wildcats and other wild animals. It was...

Biography of James S. Hudson

JAMES S. HUDSON. This gentleman is one of the substantial residents of Newton County, Arkansas, and is also one of the pioneers of the same, for he has resided here since his birth, which occurred on February 4, 1857. His uncle, Samuel Hudson, was the first white settler of the county, having come to this region in 1830, and his brother, Andrew Hudson, the father of James S., came here in 1835 from his native county of Jackson,Tennessee, where he was born in 1818. He settled on a farm about three miles west of where Jasper now is on Little Buffalo Creek, and so dense was the cane along that bottom that he was compelled to get out and cut a road through it. He lived on this farm for some years, but later moved to a farm one mile west of Jasper, on which his son William now resides, and where he died in the fall of 1891. He was quite successful in the accumulation of worldly goods, and was a substantial, law-abiding and public-spirited citizen. In his political views he always supported the principles of Democracy and at one time ably filled the office of county treasurer. Wild game was abundant when he first came to this section, and he and his brother Samuel became well known as hunters, for many were the deer and bears that fell victims to their unerring marksmanship. Mr. Hudson was married to Miss Sarah Holt, a native of Tennessee, who survived him about one year, having become the mother of the following children: Nancy, married I.J. Dum and died in California;...

Biography of Hon. M. T. Brisco

In reviewing the various professional interests of Newton County, Arkansas, the name of M. T. Brisco cannot be ignored, for he is one of her most successful legal lights. Although it is a known fact that, given the ordinary average education and good judgment, any man may make a success in the avenues of trade, yet in the profession of law he must be endowed with superior intelligence and have gone through years of careful study and training to be able to cope with the brilliant minds which do honor to the bench and bar. Mr. Brisco is a gentleman of well-known ability, and one who is an ornament to the profession. He owes his nativity to Searcy County, Arkansas, where he was born January 1, 1846, a son of Isham and Rebecca (Parker) Brisco, who were born in North Carolina in 1816 and Tennessee in 1823, respectively. The father was a lad of about twelve years when he became a resident of Washington County, Arkansas, coming thither with some of his elder brothers, and, as wild game was very plentiful in the region at that time, he and his brothers became quite noted hunters. He was a thoroughly self-educated man, was a successful school teacher, and was an exceptionally skillful penman, but the most of his life was devoted to tilling the soil, in which occupation he met with a good degree of success. In 1836 he took a trip to Texas, traveling over that country on horseback, but owing to the unsettled condition of the country he did not locate there, but returned to Arkansas, and for...

Biography of Robert Capps

ROBERT CAPPS. This gentleman has been a resident of this section since 1837, coming thither from St. Louis County, Missouri, where he had settled in 1836. He was born in Mecklenburg County, N. C., February 2, 1820, in which State his parents, Richard and Rachel (Barnhill) Capps, were also born and reared. After their marriage they removed to Tennessee and made a good home for themselves in Grainger County, but in 1836 removed to Missouri, and the following year came to this section of Arkansas. The father became a prominent farmer of Newton County, but was called from life in Boone County in 1867, his wife having died in Alabama in 1828, after having borne him two children: William and Robert. Mr. Capps’ second wife was Pricie Brady, who resides in Indian Territory. Two children resulted from this union. Mr. Capps was a Democrat in politics. The early life of Robert Capps was spent in his native State, and in the mountains of Newton County, Arkansas Following in his father’s footsteps he became quite a noted Nimrod in his youth, and, while the State was in a primitive condition, he killed many bears and deer, and on one occasion in one day killed four panthers. He had many thrilling experiences and many narrow escapes from death, but his nerve and coolness carried him through safely on every occasion. He began doing for himself in 1837, and passed a very eventful life in the wilds of Newton County, a life which he greatly enjoyed on account of its freedom and independence, notwithstanding the hardships which he was compelled to undergo....

Biography of Alexander Campbell McCutcheon

ALEX. CAMPBELL McCUTCHEON. Our subject, is an energetic and enlightened farmer and stockraiser of Newton County, Arkansas, and one whose career thus far has been of gratifying success. He is a native of Tennessee, and although that State has produced many excellent citizens, she has contributed to Arkansas none more highly respected than Mr. McCutcheon, who has been a resident of the latter State many years. He is one of the leading farmers of his section and has followed that calling since his earliest boy-hood, being initiated into its mysteries by his father, E. Norris McCutcheon. The latter was a native of Tennessee and was there married to Miss Nancy Hale, also a product of that State. About 1844 they came to Arkansas, making the journey by ox-team and being two months on the way, and were among the first settlers of this section. Here Mrs. McCutchcon died about 1869 or 1870, and the father followed her to the grave in 1872. All his life Mr. McCutcheon followed agricultural pursuits, and when he first settled in Arkansas he was quite fond of hunting. His father, James McCutcheon, was born in Giles County, Tennessee, and was of Irish origin. The maternal grandfather of Alex. Campbell McCutcheon, a Mr. Hale, died in Tennessee when Mrs. McCutcheon was a little girl. Afterward Mrs. Hale married. Of the thirteen children born to his parents Mr. McCutcheon was fifth in order of birth. The others were named as follows: James, of Scarcy County; William R., of Newton County; Andrew J., of Newton County, who enlisted in Company D, Second Arkansas Cavalry, Federal Army, and...

Biography of James Wiley Salmon

JAMES WILEY SALMON. The following is a brief sketch of the career of James Wiley Salmon, a man whose present substantial position in life has been reached entirely through his own perseverance, and the facts connected with his agricultural and stockraising operations, and their results, only show what a person with courage and enlightened views can accomplish. He was born February 7, 1826, in Hickman County, Tennessee, and was a son of James and Nancy (Storey) Salmon, natives of Scotland and Edgecombe County, N. C., respectively. It is thought that James Salmon came to the United States when quite young, and was the only one of his family to cross the ocean. He probably married in Tennessee and located in Hickman County, where he followed farming until his death, which occurred when James was six months old (1826). Very little is known of his people. Mrs. Salmon remained on the little farm in Hickman County until about 1846, when her sons brought her to Newton County, Arkansas, where her death occurred in 1859 or 1860. She was a Methodist in her religious views. Her father, Daniel Storey, was a native of the Old North State, but at an early date moved to Henderson County, Tennessee, where he probably passed the remainder of his days engaged in farming. He was a soldier in the Revolutionary War and had his right thumb shot off. James W. Salmon was the youngest of five children, two sons and three daughters: Margaret, deceased, was the wife of John Gray; Elizabeth, wife of James Hostettler, of Grayson County, Texas; John S. died in Barry County,...

Biography of Capt. A. R. McPherson

CAPT. A. R. MCPHERSON. This worthy gentleman and old pioneer of Newton County, Arkansas, comes of fine old Virginia stock, although he, himself, was born in the State of Alabama, August 17, 1830, the seventh of eleven children born to the marriage of Reuben McPherson and Elizabeth Rash. The father was one of the early pioneers of Tennessee and took part in the War of 1812, under Gen. Jackson, with whom he participated in the battle of New Orleans. After the war he was married in Tennessee and moved with his young wife to Jackson County, Ala., where he was called from life, August 15, 1842. The following spring his widow sold the farm in Alabama and moved to Boone County, Arkansas, settling on Crooked Creek, seven miles south of Harrison, where she lived until October, 1848, when she came to Newton County and settled on the Hudson Fork of the Buffalo, where she has since made her home with the exception of the last four years. Her second husband was Rev. J. E. Casey, of Newton County, who died in 1863. She was born in 1799 and is now in her ninety-sixth year, and is by far the oldest person in this part of the country. Notwithstanding her advanced years she is in excellent health and enjoys the society of her children and grandchildren. Her children, eleven in number, were named as follows: S. R., who is living in Texas; Hiram, who died in Alabama at the age of thirteen years; Cynthia, who died in Boone County, Arkansas, the wife of Joseph Terry; Elizabeth, who resides in Marion...

Biography of Joseph B. Moss

JOSEPH B. MOSS. This wide-awake merchant of Jasper, Newton County, Arkansas, has been successful in the conduct of his affairs from a pecuniary stand-point, and is a liberal, generous and high-minded gentlemen, whose correct mode of living has gathered about him a large circle of friends and well wishers. He was born in Georgia, August 8, 1849, and in the section where he was born, was reared and educated, although he was for some time an attendant of the schools of Tennessee. He was brought up on his father’s farm, and when the great strife between the North and South came up, he was but a lad in his thirteenth year. In 1874 he came to Newton County, Arkansas, and his first business venture was after he reached this section, as a clerk in the store of Mr. Hudson, at Mount Parthenon, with whom he remained two years. In 1881 he became the Republican nominee for representative to the State Legislature, and after being elected and filling the office with ability until his term expired, he turned his attention to agricultural pursuits, which he followed with fair results until 1884. At the end of that time he moved to Montana and during the seven years he remained there he was engaged in the mercantile pursuits and continued to follow this occupation after his return to Arkansas. He has been successful in every enterprise to which he has devoted his attention and is now doing an annual business of $25,000. He at all times endeavors to supply the wants of his patrons, is courteous and accommodating in his attendance upon...

Biography of Dr. George W. Thompson

DR. GEORGE W. THOMPSON. Dr. George W. Thompson is a successful follower of Aesculapius at Cave Creek, Arkansas, and through ability and well merited success has built up a practice that is eminently satisfactory. He is a product of Caldwell County, Kentucky, born in 1836, and the son of William R. Thompson who was born in Claiborne County, Tennessee, in 1807. The father was liberally educated in his native State and was there married to Miss Elizabeth Wells, also of Tennessee, and a lady of more than ordinary intelligence. She was born in Knox County in 1809. About 1834 the parents removed to Caldwell County, Kentucky, and in 1854 came by wagon to Monroe County, Arkansas, but after remaining there a short time removed to Lawrence County, where Mr. Thompson died in 1855. Four years later the mother received her final summons and both are interred in that county. She was a worthy member of the Baptist Church. Mr. Thompson followed the occupation of a blacksmith and wagonmaker and was an industrious, hardworking citizen. Our subject’s grandfather, Ephraim Thompson, was probably born in the highlands of Scotland, and when but a boy came to America, locating in east Tennessee. He was a soldier in the War of 1812, and an officer. His death occurred in Mobile, Ala., and his wife passed away in Knox County, Tennessee James Wells, the maternal grandfather, died in Knox County, Tennessee He was of German origin and was a farmer and overseer. Of the thirteen children born to his parents our subject was fourth in order of birth. The others were named as follows:...
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