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Biographical Sketch of Peter Garlock

(III) Peter, son of Abram and Catharine (Cook) Garlock (q. v.), was one of nine children and was born in Phelps, Ontario county, New York, October 6, 1832, died February 17, 1904. Twenty-seven years of his life were spent in Arcadia, New York, and he then made his permanent and final home in Phelps. In 1863 he commenced the distilling of cider brandy and peppermint oil, about two and one-half miles southwest of Newark, New York, continuing this plant for the distilling of cider brandy until about 1893, when he discontinued. In 1879 he built a cider mill in Phelps, New York, and in 1885 he added to the plant and put in new and improved machinery. The plant then had a capacity of three thousand barrels of cider annually, and this was constantly being increased as the demand for the excellent product became more extended. In 1890 he admitted his son Charles H. to a partnership in the business, under the firm name of P. Garlock & Son. Mr. Garlock married (first), in 1857, Maria Van De Vort, of Phelps, who died in 1886. Children: Ellen, married O. M. Lincoln; Abram, Thomas, Charles H., Kate, Alfred and Jessie M. He married (second) Cecelia Smith, of Rochester, New York; children: Arthur and...

Biography of Edwin K. Burnham

EDWIN K. BURNHAM A BUSY, representative man, who has faithfully served his country both in a military and civil capacity, is the Hon. Edwin K. Burnham, the present careful, efficient superintendent of public buildings of the state of New York, whose official residence is now in Albany. In his veins flow the blood of the loyal, patriotic, enterprising race of New Englanders. Vermont is his native state, and in the rural town of Randolph – named, we believe, in honor of the famous Virginian orator and statesman John Randolph – he was born on the 8th of September, 1839. His father at one time was a member of the Vermont legislature. After first attending the common schools of his native place, when a mere child he was sent to the academy at Royalton, VT., where he spent several terms closely pursuing his studies and showing more than ordinary progress among youthful students in the attainment of knowledge. His classical course was afterward completed in the Orange County, VT., grammar school. He first established himself at Newark, a flourishing village in Wayne County, N. Y., where his reputation as a young man of high and honorable principles and of a public-spirited nature soon brought him into favorable notice and gained for him the full confidence of his townsmen. Naturally of a judicial turn of mind, it was easy for him to turn his attention to the study of the law as a congenial profession. And accordingly, with this object in view, he came to Albany in the spring of 1862, and attended one term in the excellent and popular law...

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