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Biography of Cyrus E. Baker, M.D.

Cyrus E. Baker, M.D., of Claremont, Sullivan County, N.H., the well-known physician and oculist, was born in Plainfield, this State, April 9, 1835, son of Dimic and Hannah (Colby) Baker. He is of the eighth generation in descent from Jeffrey Baker, who came from England, and was one of the original settlers of Windsor, Conn. Jeffrey Baker married November 25, 1642, Joan Rockwell. They had five children, one of them being a son, Joseph, born June 18, 1655, who married Hannah Cook Buckland, January 30, 1677. Five children were the fruit of this union. Joseph Baker’s son, Joseph, Jr., born April 13, 1678, was married on July 8, 1702, to Hannah Pomroy, by whom he had Joseph, Jr., second, and Samuel; and by his second wife, Abigail Bissel, he had John, Hannah, Jacob, Abigail, Ebenezer, Daniel, Heman, Titus, and Abigail. Joseph, Jr., second, died January 29, 1754; his wife, Abigail, died February 13, 1768. Their son, Heman, the next in this line, was born April 27, 1719. He married Lois Gilbert, November 24, 1747, and had the following children: Heman, Jr., who was a soldier Anna; Deborah; John; Oliver, who became a doctor of medicine; Abigail; Lois; Delight; and Lydia. Oliver Baker, son of Heman, was born at Tolland, Conn., October 5, 1755, and died October 3, 1811. He married Dorcas Dimic, March 23, 1780. She was born September 23, 1760, and died October 3, 1849. Their children were: Heman; Diantha; Zinia and Lina, who were twins; Oliver, Jr.; Semantha; Dimic; Dorcas; Lodema; Elizabeth; and Mary. Heman died March 16, 1845. Lina died August 27, 1808. Dorcas died July...

Slave Narrative of Rev. Wamble

Interviewer: Archie Koritz Person Interviewed: Rev. Wamble Location: Gary, Indiana Place of Birth: Monroe County, Mississippi, Date of Birth: 1859 Place of Residence: 1827 Madison Street, Gary, Indiana Occupation: Wagon-maker Archie Koritz, Field Worker Federal Writers’ Project Porter County-District #1 Valparaiso, Indiana EX-SLAVES REV. WAMBLE 1827 Madison Street Gary, Indiana [TR: above ‘Wamble’ in handwriting is ‘Womble’] Rev. Wamble was born a slave in Monroe County, Mississippi, in 1859. The Westbrook family owned many slaves in charge of over-seers who managed the farm, on which there were usually two hundred or more slaves. One of the Westbrook daughters married a Mr. Wamble, a wagon-maker. The Westbrook family gave the newly-weds two slaves, as did the Wamble family. One of the two slaves coming from the Westbrook family was Rev. Wamble’s grandfather. It seems that the slaves took the name of their master, hence Rev. Wamble’s grandfather was named Wamble. Families owning only a few slaves and in moderate circumstances usually treated their slaves kindly since like a farmer with only a few horses, it was to their best interest to see that their slaves were well provided for. The slaves were valuable, and there was no funds to buy others, whereas the large slave owners were wealthy and one slave more or less made little difference. The Reverend’s father and his brothers were children of original African slaves and were of the same age as the Wamble boys and grew up together. The Reverend’s grandfather was manager of the farm and the three Wamble boys worked under him the same as the slaves. Mr. Wamble never permitted any of...

Biography of John MacDonald

John MacDonald of Topeka has probably done more for the cause of education in Kansas than any other one man, and in saying this no disparagement is intended for the scores of men and women who have devoted much of their lives to educational work. He may well be distinguished as a pioneer in the method of reason as applied to learning. His kindly personality has left a deep impress for good, and many who have achieved distinction in the different walks of life are indebted to him for their early training. Throughout his career he has evidently been impressed with the importance of the great truth that to educate is more important than to govern, since to train men wisely for self-government is more important than to govern them untrained. He is one of the men who have belped to vitalize education and the school system of the great State of Kansas. John MacDonald was born February 6, 1843, at Linshader, in the Lewis, a short distance from the Standing Stones of Callernish in the Parish of Uig, in the Hebrides. His birthplace will recall to a great many the land of Sheila, the “Princess of Thule,” made famous in the novel of that name by Black. When he was very small his people removed to the mainland of Scotland, to Gairloch in Wester Ross, where he was reared and where he received his primary education. His subsequent schooling was at a workingmen’s college in London, England, at Cooper’s Institute, New York City, and at other places where he attended night school after his day’s work was over....

Biography of Rev. John Dunbar

Rev. John Dunbar was a missionary to the Pawnes Indians of the West for a period of more than twenty years before he became a resident of Kansas. He spent a little over a year in the territory and, as its first treasurer, assisted in the organization of Brown County. Mr. Dunbar was a native of Palmer, Massachusetts, born March 3, 1804. In 1832 he was graduated at Williams College, and later at the Auburn Theological Seminary. While a student at the latter institution he received an appointment as missionary to the western Indians; was ordained at Ithaca, New York, May 1, 1834, and on the 5th left there, with instructions to cross the Rocky Mountains to the Nez Perces. Upon arriving at St. Louis on the 23d, he learned that the party of traders with whom he was to travel had already left for the West, but was informed at the same time that the Pawnee tribe needed missionaries, and he decided to go there. As soon as possible he reported at the agency at Bellevue, nine miles above the mouth of the Platte River, on the west bank of the Missouri, and began his work as missionary. In September, 1836, he returned to Massachusetts, and while there superintended the printing of a book of seventy-four pages in the Pawnee language. On Jannary 12, 1837, he married Miss Esther Smith, and the following spring returned to Bellevue, where he and his wife began housekeeping in an old trading house. Later he went to Holt County, Missouri, but preferring a residence in a free state, and confident that Kansas...

Biography of Thomas E. Wagstaff

An attorney of long and successful experience in Montgomery County, both in Coffeyville and Independence, Thomas E. Wagstaff had been and is a leader in republican politics in the state, and a few years ago his name beeame known all over Kansas as a candidate for nomination to the office of governor. He lost the nomination by only a few votes. This was in 1910, when W. R. Stubbs was nominated and afterwards elected. His family have been identified with Kansas for forty years. Thomas E. Wagstaff was born at Galesburg, Illinois, July 23, 1875, and was still an infant when brought to this state. His father, Richard T. Wagstaff, who died at Lawrenec in 1901, is said to have been the best known traveling salesman in Kansas, and was known among retail merchants, the traveling fraternity in general, and a great host of other citizens by the affectionate title of “Uncle Dick.” For years he represented a hardware honse of St. Louis, and traveled over all the State of Kansas. He was born in Cork, Ireland, in 1842, a son of Robert Wagstaff, a native of the same place. The Wagstaff family in Ireland were of the gentry, and back in the times of the protectorate Oliver Cromwell gave thom grants of land which are still owned by their descendants. Robert Wagstaff came to America at the close of the Civil war and lived in Monmouth, Illinois, until his death. Richard T. Wagstaff came to this country in 1859 and lived in Monmouth, Illinois, until the breaking out of the Civil war. He enlisted in Company A of...

Slave Narrative of Andrew Boone

Interviewer: T. Pat Matthews Person Interviewed: Andrew Boone Location: Wake County, North Carolina. Harris Farm. Age: 90 years Occupation: Worked in show business I been living in dese backer barns fifteen years. I built this little shelter to cook under. Dey cut me off the WPA cause dey said I wus too ole to work. Dey tole us ole folks we need not put down our walkin’ sticks to git work cause dey jes’ won’t goin’ to put us on. Well, I had some tomatoes cooked widout any grease for my breakfast. I had a loaf of bread yesterday, but I et it. I ain’t got any check from the ole age pension an’ I have nothin’ to eat an’ I am hongry. I jes’ looks to God. I set down by de road thinkin’ bout how to turn an’ what to do to git a meal, when you cum along. I thanks you fer dis dime. I guess God made you give it to me. I wus glad to take you down to my livin’ place to give you my story. Dis shelter, an ole tobacco barn, is better dan no home at all. I is a man to myself an’ I enjoy livin’ out here if I could git enough to eat. Well de big show is coming to town. It’s de Devil’s wurk. Yes sir, it’s de Devil’s wurk. Why dem show folks ken make snakes an’ make ’em crawl too. Dere wus one in Watson Field in de edge of Raleigh not long ago an’ he made snakes an’ made ’em crawl too. All shows...

Slave Narrative of Joe High

Interviewer: T. Pat Matthews Person Interviewed: Joe High Location: Raleigh, North Carolina Age: 80 Occupation: Gardner Joe High interviewed May 18, 1937 has long been one of the best independent gardners in Raleigh, working variously by the hour or day. My name is Joe High. I lives at 527 So. Haywood. St. Raleigh, N. C. Now dere is one thing I want to know, is dis thing goin’ to cost me anything. Hold on a minute, and le’ me see. I want to be square, and I must be square. Now le’ me see, le’ me see sumpin’. Sometimes folks come here and dey writes and writes; den dey asts me, is you goin’ to pay dis now? What will it cost? Well, if it costs nothin’ I’ll gib you what I knows. Let me git my Bible. I wants to be on de square, because I got to leave here some of dese days. Dis is a record from de slave books. I’ve been tryin’ to git my direct age for 35 years. My cousin got my age. I wuz born April 10, 1857. My mother’s name wuz Sarah High. Put down when she wuz born, Oct. 24, 1824. This is from the old slave books. We both belonged to Green High, the young master. The old master, I nebber seed him; but I saw old missus, Mis’ Laney High. The old master died before I wuz born. We lived two miles north uv Zebulon. You know where Zebulon is in Wake County? I had two brothers, one brother named Taylor High, ‘nother named Ruffin High. My sister...

Biography of William H. Vogt, M. D.

For twenty-three years Dr. William H. Vogt has engaged in medicine in St. Louis, his native city. He was born September 9, Dr. Gustavus Vogt, who is a native of Germany and on coming to first in Davenport, Iowa, whence he removed to St. Louis. He was the Missouri Medical College of this city in 1878, since which time continuous and active practice here, being today one of the oldest practicing physicians of the city, having for forty-three years followed his profession in St. Louis. He belongs to the St. Louis Medical Society, the Missouri State Medical Association and the American Medical Association and has always kept abreast with the trend of modern professional thought and practice. He now has his offices with his son in the Metropolitan building and resides at No. 4977 Lotus avenue. He married Lina Merkel, who was born in Illinois and is of German descent. By her marriage she became the mother of seven children, six of these being daughters. Dr. William H. Vogt, the only son and the second child, was educated in the public schools of St. Louis and in private schools, while later he took up the study of medicine in Washington University and was graduated with the class of 1898. He then served for a year in the St. Louis City Infirmary and for an equal period in the St. Louis Female Hospital, after which he went abroad, spending several years in post-graduate work in Berlin, Vienna and Dresden. Upon his return to America he became assistant to the late Dr. A. C. Bernays, a distinguished surgeon, with whom he...

Biography of Frank Hastings Hamilton

For thirty-three years Frank Hastings Hamilton has been identified with railway service and winning consecutive promotion, has since July, 1896, been secretary and treasurer of the St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad Company and its successor company, St. Louis-San Francisco Railway Company, with offices in St. Louis. He was born in New York city, September 5, 1865, and was accorded liberal educational opportunities, completing his studies in the University of France at Paris, where he won his Bachelor of Science degree upon graduation with the class of 1883. Two years later saw the beginning of his identification with railway interests. He was secretary and general agent of the express department of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad at New York city until December 31, 1887, when he became an employe of the St. Louis & San Francisco Railroad at New York, occupying the position of clerk to the secretary and treasurer in that city from January, 1888, until November, 1890. He was then made chief clerk to the vice president of the same road with headquarters in Boston, where he remained until March, 1893. Until December of the same year he was acting comptroller of the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad at Boston and from January until September, 1894, was deputy comptroller at New York, after which he became cashier for the receivers of the same road in that city, thus continuing until December, 1895. At that date he was made treasurer for the receivers of the St. Louis & San Francisco Railway at New York and continued in the position until July, 1896. With the reorganization of the...

Biography of Selden Spencer, M. D.

Dr. Selden Spencer, surgeon and laryngologist enjoying an extensive and important practice in St. Louis as a professional associate of Dr. Richard Johnson Payne, was born in this city March 23, 1873, and is a son of Dr. H. N. Spencer, a distinguished physician who passed away in August, 1915. The son was educated in the public and manual training schools of St. Louis and in St. Paul’s School at Concord, New Hampshire, before entering Princeton College, where he won his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1897. He then took up the study of medicine in Washington University and gained his M. D. degree in 1899. Following his graduation he served for one year as interne in the St. Louis City Hospital and during the succeeding two years studied abroad in various European colleges, being at different periods in Berlin, London and Edinburgh. On his return he became associated with his father in practice and the relation was maintained until the father’s death. Qualifying thoroughly for treatment of diseases of the ear, nose and throat and also for surgical work Dr. Spencer has won prominence in those fields. He served as chief of the ear clinic in the Washington University and was also on the staff of the Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat Hospital. At the present writing he is otolaryngologist for the Missouri Baptist Sanitarium. During the World war he was assistant surgeon and surgeon in the United States Public Health Service Hospital and he was also a captain of the Missouri Home Guard. Dr. Spencer belongs to various societies formed for the purpose of promoting knowledge and...
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